Parties arrange early Key/Cunliffe exits

National and Labour have worked together to arrange for the early exit of John Key and David Cunliffe from Parliament. They are both leaving just close enough to the election to avoid automatic by-elections, and with both leaving at about the same time the vote balance in parliament won’t be upset.

Too bad for their electorates that will be left unrepresented until after the election. Neither electorate has a current list MP standing so that leave no one to step in for them.

Stuff: Key, Cunliffe set date for final departures in move to preserve Parliament’s balance

Former Prime Minister John Key will quit Parliament on April 14 after delivering his farewell speech next week.

The timing will allow Parliament to avoid a by-election in his Helensville seat, which can be left vacant if he leaves within six months of the September 23 general election.

Meanwhile Labour’s David Cunliffe has also announced he is leaving early, with a final day of April 23 – ensuring the relative strengths of the Government and Opposition are preserved.

It is becoming more common for MPs and also for local body politicians to leave mid-term at their own convenience rather than fulfil their full term commitment.

Key will give his valedictory speech on March 22 and his resignation will take take effect on April 14.

Cunliffe’s valedictory speech will be on April 11 and his resignation will take effect on April 23.

6 Comments

  1. Pete Kane

     /  March 15, 2017

    Imagine (for what ever reason) in the coming days he has to put the election back a couple of months. Now that would be a hoot and a half.

    • Politicians like Key and Cunliffe must be just marking time and probably won’t have their hearts in the job but on principle they shouldn’t desert their posts at their earliest convenience.

      • PDB

         /  March 15, 2017

        At least they hung around long enough to not trigger a costly by-election unlike Goff & Shearer……I’d suggest the parties themselves are wanting the two leaders at the last election gone well before this years election.

      • Pete Kane

         /  March 15, 2017

        I.ve never bought the cost of a By-election argument. Reducing our democracy to peanuts (not to mention the way politicians play this cynical little ‘financial card’).

        • I’m not quite sure how to reconcile these two consecutive statements from parliament.nz, but I know in my heart of hearts I can trust the source whatever they say …

          “The average cost of the six by-elections held since 2010 is over three quarters of a million dollars ($773,500).

          The most recent by-election, that of Northland in 2015, cost $958,000 according to the Electoral Commission.”

          Some by-elections in the past must have been quite cheap …?

          Anyhow, for the price of a Flag Consideration Process, we can get around 37 by-elections! …. So by-elections are pretty damn good value IMHO … !!!

  2. Pete Kane

     /  March 15, 2017

    The most recent by-election, that of Northland in 2015, cost $958,000 according to the Electoral Commission.”
    No