What to do about obesity?

The obvious answer to what to do about obesity is to eat less and to eat better foods. But many people obviously have difficulty with this, to the extent that obesity is being called an epidemic. There have been claims that due to obesity the trend of increasing life expectancy will reverse.

Stuff: For our Food for Thought series, we asked each party currently represented in Parliament how to improve Kiwis’ diets.

David Seymour: Obesity ‘an epidemic of choice’ but we must help poor

One in three Kiwis are obese.

New Zealand’s biggest problem is our ease of access to cheap, delicious, high-calorie food. We’re a victim of our own success.

The strange reality of obesity is that it’s an epidemic of choice.

The problems start when kids are affected, when the poorest communities suffer disproportionately, and when healthy taxpayers have to fork out for other people’s heart surgeries.

Some suggest removing GST from fruit and veges.

Another popular idea is advertising restrictions.

And that brings us to the real issue: shielding people from real-world decisions sends them the message that they are dumb, and government is smart. “Don’t take responsibility for yourself, or your kids. Nanny state will handle that.”

So what can politicians do?

ACT’s solution is the same as our solution to other social problems: empowering people with greater opportunity. That includes, but is not limited to, a useful education, an engaging job in a growing economy, and a realistic shot at a place of your own for every single New Zealander.

There is no “solution”. There could and should be more done to reduce the problems of poor health due to overeating. But it is a very very difficult thing to deal with in practice. Going cold turkey isn’t an option.

Peter Dunne: Education the key to improving Kiwis’ food habits

The answer to attaining healthier eating habits is not to have the Government become the parent of our nation’s parents. Rather, UnitedFuture endorses education as the pathway to empowering New Zealand consumers to make choices that are the best for their and their family’s circumstances.

UnitedFuture has three key policy areas we want to see changes to ensure that information is both freely available and publicised:

* We would develop a national fund to sponsor programmes to promote better nutrition, particularly for children and youth;

* We would use the tools of Government to facilitate public education campaigns that emphasise the importance of nutrition and exercise and the consequences of poor nutrition, such as diabetes, heart disease, stroke, cancer, and premature aging;

* We would support stronger consumer information rules by encouraging more information about food products to be published that are easily accessible by consumers (such as calorie count);

UnitedFuture has confidence in New Zealanders that they can make decisions that are right for them and their families when they are equipped with full information.

I see two major problems.

How do you educate the many people who are beyond school age? Compulsory night classes? Teaching kids at school is one possibility but for many school age is already too late, eating habits have already been established.

And education and knowledge doesn’t stop people from eating too much and it doesn’t stop people from making poor choices about what food they eat.

Many people know full well that scoffing junk food and gutsing too much is not good for their physical or mental health – depression and lack of self worth is a major factor in overeating, and it has a snowball effect as people approach the shape of a snowball.

Can growing obesity be stemmed? I really don’t know what would be effective.

It is very difficult to have any success telling someone not to eat as much.


After writing this I found more:

Jonathan Coleman, National: Tackling obesity is a priority for the Government
David Clark, Labour: Food labelling flaws make healthy eating hard for Kiwis
Julie Anne Genter, Green Party: Government must help kids, not food corporations to tackle obesity
Barbara Stewart, NZ First: Healthy eating a struggle for Kiwis
David Seymour, ACT: Obesity ‘an epidemic of choice’ but we must help poor
* The Maori Party did not take up our invitation to participate

Leave a comment

86 Comments

  1. PDB

     /  March 17, 2017

    Is obesity bad, or is ‘fat shaming’ & discriminating against obese people bad?

    Often it is the same people rallying against both.

    Reply
  2. I sort of agree PDB, ‘body shape’ discrimination plays a part … One factor in a much larger, incredibly complex paradigm … I believe there’s healthy largesse and unhealthy?

    The fundamental problem IMHO is that the entire system encourages obesity. So-called “Freedom of Choice” in Fast Food – including the freedom to market ‘harmful’ foods – leads to Fad Diets and Gym, and/or Fast Pharma treatment or Surgical Intervention … with Fashion & Celebrity culture championing unrealistic body images … and Advertising providing the key ingredients “influence and persuasion” … et al ad infinitum …

    The ever-increasing instant gratification society …

    Fundamental systemic change might work? I mean, how many people actually have any, some or all of these … “a useful education, an engaging job in a growing economy, and a realistic shot at a place of your own”?

    We could ease off the pressure, ease off the stress, ease up on the false “need” to have economic growth beyond what naturally occurs from population growth …

    Example: If “depression and lack of self worth is a major factor in overeating”, then we don’t teach people not to overeat, we teach them about and treat their depression, educate them about and foster their self-worth … At ground-zero, these things will inevitably be about human relationships … almost certainly family relationships … if not dysfunctional relationships at school or work …

    But nothing can be forced upon the population … other than Advertising … because this is interfering with so-called Freedom of Choice …

    Reply
    • The ever growing instant gratification society … Market Society … The money-go-round that is our economy and “Economy Rules Okay” regardless of how harmful it is …

      Plenty of people and agglomerations of people want to maintain it just like this …

      It feeds obesity … Obesity feeds it …

      Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  March 17, 2017

      Largesse-generosity of giving-has nothing to do with size or health, surely.

      I would disagree that 1/3 of the population is obese; one just needs to look around to see that while there are a lot of fat people, it’s nothing like 1/3.

      Fat shaming will not help, except that it makes the mockers like Katie Hopkins feel good about themselves and admire their own wit in ridiculing fat people (especially children, who are a soft target) and calling them animals. ‘Cruelty to animals’ was one of her comments about a fat child, and she publicly ridiculed a cancer patient for the fat arms caused by the disease !

      The friend who has lost 50kg-50 !!!-would not have been helped by finger-pointing and fat-shaming. Encouragement is much more successful. She is looking better and better; she is still a big woman, but she is more mobile, she is healthier and her self-esteem is much, much higher.

      Reply
  3. @ David Seymour – “And that brings us to the real issue: shielding people from real-world decisions sends them the message that they are dumb, and government is smart. “Don’t take responsibility for yourself, or your kids. Nanny state will handle that.”

    Spoken like a true anarcho-capitalist … You gotta admire the guy … I do (in case anyone’s wondering) …

    The corollary is “And that brings us to the other real issue: overwhelming people with real-world, often escapist or ‘easy’ decisions sends them the message that they are incompetent, and the Market is smart and compassionate (via Charity affiliation). “No need or time to take responsibility for yourself entirely, or your kids. Big Daddy Free-Market will sort it all out.”

    As always … polarisation … false dichotomy … EITHER/OR … BS!

    Reply
  4. PDB

     /  March 17, 2017

    Better food education is the key, banning sugar and the like with kids often just leads to them being totally unprepared for the real world when they are older and have to make food decisions for themselves.

    Reply
    • Yep … the good old “real world”, where people are allowed to add copious amounts of sugar, salt, preservatives, artificial flavours, flavour enhancers and all sorts of *shitey* things to so-called food because of so-called ‘freedom of choice’ …

      Oh yeah … and because the really successful ones … like successful at selling non-nutritious, often verifiably harmful food – which would otherwise be called poison – and making people obese and sick, have ‘Charities’ to care for their sick clientelles’ sick babies …

      That’s what we gotta prepare our children for … CHOICE!!!!

      Reply
      • PDB

         /  March 17, 2017

        Your one-eyed (somewhat bitter) view of the world fails to acknowledge the other side of the ledger – that healthy food options are the largest today than ever before in terms of natural products being more easily available to consumers, dairy-free, gluten-free, free-range, sugar-free etc etc……………not only that but they taste much better today than in the past so no excuse to not eat more healthier if one wants to.

        Reply
        • Blazer

           /  March 17, 2017

          those things while available are comparitively…expensive and that is a factor.

          Reply
          • Anonymous Coward

             /  March 17, 2017

            A major factor. As is what is cheap.
            When money is an issue the choices are dire.

            Reply
          • PDB

             /  March 17, 2017

            If budgetary concerns are the problem then you get back to the old chestnut of purchasing raw ingredients yourself and preparing healthy nutritious meals from home like most people used to do not so long ago – sadly laziness stops many people from doing so.

            Reply
            • Oh no PDB … Not the “good old days” … ? Just laziness is it …?

              A combination of lack of time, life-long conditioning to the instant gratification economy, plus possible lack of education about preparing food – and even home preserving regulations – might all be factors in conspiring against home-made …

              To a lot of people these days, home-made might mean mince + frozen veges + a sachet of Oriental flavouring with 1350+ mgs of salt in it …

            • PDB

               /  March 17, 2017

              Let me sum up your reply PZ;

              Obesity is all somebody else’s fault…….

            • MaureenW

               /  March 17, 2017

              @ Kitty
              ..”epilepsy has been around since …. “.

              So has gluttony

          • PDB

             /  March 17, 2017

            Soft drinks are always brought up for needing a sugar tax but sugar-free options are readily available and are no more expensive than the traditional product.

            Reply
            • Blazer

               /  March 17, 2017

              why do they still make the sugar option then…do you think?

            • PDB

               /  March 17, 2017

              Because it is the original product Blazer and in moderation will do no harm to people with a generally healthy, balanced diet.

            • Blazer

               /  March 17, 2017

              @PDB…you will find its about…taste.

            • PDB

               /  March 17, 2017

              The taste difference between coke and coke-zero is so minor that anybody serious about wanting to reduce their sugar intake could do so quite easily (and many have) in order to get their soft-drink ‘fix’…….far easier than changing from drinking Coke to drinking water for instance.

            • Anonymous Coward

               /  March 17, 2017

              Diet Coke has no sugar, but it seems to be quite addictive from what I’ve seen. (and fake sugar sometimes ends up being carcinogenic too)

            • MaureenW

               /  March 17, 2017

              Non calorific sugar substitutes are worse for humans than sugar. Does the name Aspartame ring any bells.

              “….aspartame is a cause for over 90 serious health problems such as cancer, leukemia, headaches, seizures, fibromyalgia, and epilepsy just to name a few. ..”

            • Gezza

               /  March 17, 2017

              The taste difference between coke and coke-zero is so minor….

              Might be a highly individual thing PDB. Not that I drink much coke – it doesn’t have the grunt of the 60’s – but coke & coke-zero taste completely different to me & I don’t like the zero.

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  March 17, 2017

              Aspartame does not cause all those things, this is an urban myth which has been thoroughly debunked. Unless one believes the other urban myth-that Coke has paid the entire medical profession, the FDA and others-to say that it’s harmless. one must concede that it doesn’t do those things. Epilepsy has been around since human beings have. It would be obvious if people who drank sugar-free drinks had a much higher rate of all those things.

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  March 17, 2017

              Gezza, I found that Coke Zero had a rather sickly-sweet taste and was quite different to the real thing. This also seems sweeter than it used to-or is this my imagination ? I hadn’t drunk it for several years when I had one on a stinking hot day last summer, and it seemed less-well, it’s hard to describe, but it seemed sweeter and less refreshing than it used to. I remember when Coke had a new recipe-UGHHHHH ! The palm oil choccy was nothing by comparison to that marketing disaster.

            • Blazer

               /  March 17, 2017

              @Kitty,its quite concievable Coke could pay those agencies….you seen their t.o and ad budget!

  5. MaureenW

     /  March 17, 2017

    Obese people in fact fat-shame themselves and have introduced this “fat-shaming” term to deflect their gluttony on to others.
    Copious amounts of sugar and fat soaked carbohydrates, coupled with lack of movement causes obesity.
    Like the schools run education programs on drugs, drug use and consequences, they should also run similar programs on food, nutrition and consequences.
    Good luck with any advertising campaign though, there would be an outcry that it’s intent is to fat-shame.

    Reply
    • How are those “education programs on drugs, drug use and consequences” faring in the “real world” Maureen?

      Same issues lie underneath IMHO … depression, low self-esteem … along with a pop-is-for-popularity market ME culture …

      The ‘education’ should be at ground-zero … human relationships … personal growth …

      This could be difficult in schools because of the very nature of school.

      Reply
      • MaureenW

         /  March 17, 2017

        There will always be idiots who overuse anything. Education programs targeted at children and youth can help enlighten those who don’t know any better due to their family circumstances and help those children make some better choices

        Reply
      • MaureenW

         /  March 17, 2017

        Many children become obese and morbidly obese due to their parents’ ignorance, laziness and stupidity. The low-self esteem issues in children and youth, start from their obesity, not the other way around.
        I personally know of one family, where the morbidly obese mother, now has 3 x morbidly obese children – all her own handiwork. Those children (all teens and young adults now), have self esteem issues, while their mother has taught them how to deflect any attention to their size, greed and gluttony, as “fat-shaming”.

        Reply
        • PDB

           /  March 17, 2017

          Yes, I have some good friends, both of whom were obese. Both had govt funded fat surgery a while back, my mate is now back to an overweight condition whilst his partner is again obese (as are two of their friends who had the same op). They had a child who they swore would not eat like they do but she has been obese since around age 8. Bad diet, drinking, laziness and lack of exercise the reason behind it all.

          Reply
          • Blazer

             /  March 17, 2017

            good to see you 2 good friends.More than I would have guessed.I wonder if there is any significance in the fact that both of them are obese.

            Reply
            • PDB

               /  March 17, 2017

              In English?

            • Blazer

               /  March 17, 2017

              @PDB…you have 2 friends,you are more popular than I thought.Both your friends are obese,coincidence or ?

            • PDB

               /  March 17, 2017

              That’s just being silly Blazer……….does that mean all your friends are simpletons who think their house reducing in value will lower their mortgage?

            • Blazer

               /  March 17, 2017

              @you said it….so now revert to your default reply…Hickey made an error…big deal…desperado.

            • PDB

               /  March 17, 2017

              Let me fix it for you: “Hickey made an error on a fundamental economic fact, PDB picked it up, I abused PDB for disagreeing with Hickey, Hickey and I were then proven to be wrong & economic dunces”. Done!

            • Blazer

               /  March 17, 2017

              Hickeys error does not alter the fact,that you have 2 friends…and both of them,are …obese.Pity your good friends do not take your advice….and choose to be a burden on the NZ taxpayer.

            • PDB

               /  March 17, 2017

              Hickey’s and YOUR error……….plenty of good friends Blazer, luckily only 2 of them have been obese…..

            • Blazer

               /  March 17, 2017

              @PDB….you must make ‘good’ friends easily,only an hour ago you had…2..’Yes, I have some good friends, both of whom were obese’.

            • PDB

               /  March 17, 2017

              far too literal Blazer……what about my ‘very good friends’, ‘really good friends’ or ‘quite good friends’ I didn’t mention………..

            • Blazer

               /  March 17, 2017

              @PDB…you forgot…..’imaginery’ …friends!

            • PDB

               /  March 17, 2017

              I’ll leave that to you Blazer, your hand is also one of your best friends I’d suggest…….

            • Blazer

               /  March 17, 2017

              @PDB….enough….as opposed to your hand being a really good friend,or very good….friend…Bol.

            • Gezza

               /  March 17, 2017

              👍
              Keeping it real.

          • @ PDB – “Both had govt funded fat surgery a while back …”

            I wonder if those surgeons REALLY want something done about obesity …?

            Its a money-go-round …

            Reply
            • PDB

               /  March 17, 2017

              It’s actually quite hard to get the surgery, you need to prove you can lose a certain amount of weight before you are even considered.

              Unfortunately too many people see it as a miracle cure and once they have it done don’t then don’t put the effort in to change their lifestyle.

            • Just like I said PDB … The system feeds obesity … and obesity feeds the system …

              The whole shibang is weighted AGAINST fixing the problem … including attitudes like yours and Maureen’s … e.g. that its ENTIRELY the problem of the “lazy”, good-for-nothing, uneducated individual &/or family …

              Let me sum up your position PDB … Obesity is always someone else’s problem … and someone else’s fault …The rock-solid neoliberal answer to everything …

              Not victim-blaming exactly … but some ways along that road … since you ENTIRELY discount a whole bunch of communal, collective and societal factors …

            • PDB

               /  March 17, 2017

              Scientific evidence suggests that the main causes of growing obesity are reduction in exercise and poorer eating habits than in our past – these are controllable and fixable. You can argue about all the other aspects that make it more difficult not to put on weight (food advertising, processed foods, less physical jobs, social media addiction etc) but this doesn’t alter the underling cause: People not getting off their asses to do more exercise and people eating more calories than they need to function. Again better food, health & fitness education (starting at an early age) is the answer.

            • MaureenW

               /  March 17, 2017

              @PZ – Gluttony is on the list of the Bible’s 7 Deadly Sins. The same person is to blame today, as back when the bible was written. The glutton.

            • Really!? Isn’t Lucifer responsible for people sinning …?

            • @ PDB – ” … the main causes of growing obesity are reduction in exercise and poorer eating habits than in our past”

              Scientific evidence proves these things are partly the result of lifestyle changes brought about by consciously altered economic circumstances … [economics can be nothing other than conscious] … Less exercise required in the workplace … often longer hours and more stress … both parents working … or sole parent stress … plus vastly increased opportunity and encouragement to eat Fast Food …

              Supply-side stuff …

            • MaureenW

               /  March 17, 2017

              @PZ – Lucifer? No, apparently a new heart is required, which can only be provided by God.

        • MaureenW

           /  March 17, 2017

          Misery loves company

          Reply
          • Gezza

             /  March 17, 2017

            That is true, folk who whine about the same things seem to enjoy each others company, whatever the topic or situation.

            Reply
    • Anonymous Coward

       /  March 17, 2017

      The problem is that, like everything else, food supply is a capitalist market. Taken to it’s extreme we’ve ended up in the situation, in America at least, where the basic unit of food is the carbohydrate. The more carbohydrates you can sell for a dollar the better, and thus we have high fructose corn syrup. The cheapest carbs you can buy and every single one of them is ’empty’, i.e; consumes no energy as you absorb it’s energy – instant fat accumulation.

      Reply
      • PDB

         /  March 17, 2017

        Food is only part of the problem, lack of exercise and general laziness (as in not cooking one’s own food from scratch) are also a large part of the problem. The food one eats is largely dictated by your family (when you are young) and yourself – better food education is the key to any meaningful changes being made.

        Reply
        • Blazer

           /  March 17, 2017

          laziness ,you reckon…..you haven’t mentioned stoners ..getting the munchies yet,mind you P makes you…thin….apparantly.

          Reply
        • MaureenW

           /  March 17, 2017

          I agree PDB, however children who have come from lazy homes, have never been taught to cook from scratch, only how to reheat things in packets and boxes. Education in schools and teaching basic cooking skills would go a long way.
          There are many nutritious meals that can be made for little money but you have to know about basic cooking and food preparation skills first, to get there.

          Reply
        • @ PDB – “Food is only part of the problem” … The other part is lazy, uneducated CONSUMERS of food … bad individuals and the bad families that teach the bad individuals their badness …

          PRODUCERS of food play no part in the problem at all …?

          Reply
          • PDB

             /  March 17, 2017

            Not unless they tie you up and force-feed excessive amounts of food down your throat and stop you doing some exercise………

            Reply
            • You fail to acknowledge the powers of persuasion in our society PDB … despite certain ‘powers of persuasion’ being responsible for your attitudes towards personal responsibility …

              Now its you who’s talking about an ideal or Utopian world … where no-one is influenced by others … where everyone, being entirely responsible, avoids the contagion of ‘bad choices’ festering all around them …

              I see it as saying, “We’ll only try to treat the malaria disease. We won’t attempt to do anything about the malaria-carrying mosquitos” …

            • PDB

               /  March 17, 2017

              Obesity isn’t a disease (as many are trying to paint it as) and it is totally avoidable with self-control and good attitudes to health, diet and fitness. Advertising etc may make it harder for some people to stop eating too much but advertising food & drink itself doesn’t directly cause obesity (like your malaria-carrying mosquitos cause malaria). Fast food advertising also doesn’t mean that if you eat an advertised fast food that also automatically stops you doing exercise afterwards to burn it off.

          • MaureenW

             /  March 17, 2017

            @PZ .. No producers aren’t to blame. There are producers of healthy foods and producers of crap. The consumer chooses what they buy, what they put in their mouths, and how much of it.

            In fact it is you that makes the presumption, in defence of gluttons, that they’re stupid because you state they’re not responsible for the choices they make. That they’re dim-witted lardo’s entirely led by the powers of persuasion of others.
            While you’re at blaming food producers, you may as well blame clothing manufacturers too, because they clearly manufacture clothes that are too small, and sadly the dim-witted can’t work out the right size either. Too much food, and too small clothes.

            Reply
            • @ PDB – Admittedly obesity isn’t a disease per se, like malaria. However, as a society we are using disease-like language to describe it, e.g. epidemic, and it is a known precursor of numerous killer diseases, eg heart disease, stroke, diabetes …

              @ Maureen – Let’s apply you’re “producers aren’t to blame” attitude to illicit drugs …

              I’m not saying producers are entirely to blame … but for our society, which is a collective of all of us, to allow them to do carte blanche whatever they like is equally stupid and potentially disasterous …

            • MaureenW

               /  March 17, 2017

              @ PZ producers are only “allowed” because they have enough market-share that their products are viable. People don’t have to buy those products, it’s called choice. I really don’t understand your point of view – what do you propose to eliminate gluttony?

            • Blazer

               /  March 17, 2017

              @Maureen….’producers are only “allowed” because they have enough market-share that their products are viable.’….absolute nonsense,nothing to do with …market share….you don’t know what you’re talking about.Take up knitting.

            • MaureenW

               /  March 17, 2017

              @ Blazer can you name some supermarkets that stock food lines that don’t sell? Suppliers must have certain volumes of turnover or they don’t get any shelf space. Clearly you can add retailing to the list of things you know fuck all about.

            • Blazer

               /  March 17, 2017

              @Maureen ,what additives and ingredients companies put in food has NOTHING to do with market share.Its what is allowable by law.Thats fact….you have NFI.

            • MaureenW

               /  March 17, 2017

              @ Blazer Where did I say that additives have anything to do with market share? I think you’re on a different topic – keep up old boy

            • Blazer

               /  March 17, 2017

              @Maureen..you responded to this….’I’m not saying producers are entirely to blame … but for our society, which is a collective of all of us, to allow them to do carte blanche whatever they like is equally stupid and potentially disasterous’……with your facile mkt share argument….keep up…old…girl!Key word=allow’.

            • P sells …

              Not only that, P is more available than dope in many places because of the Police’s [government’s] stringent efforts to enforce marijuana laws …

              Its a Black Market corollary of the Fast-Food ‘Free’ Market …

              The laissez faire, market-share, ‘Market Rules’ attitude has already had numerous disasterous effects … e.g. obesity … dangerous attack dogs … People don’t “need” to own dangerous attack dogs …

              I know you think I’m advocating totalitarian socialism but I’m not … just a balance of the two, individual and collective or community responsibility …

            • MaureenW

               /  March 17, 2017

              @ PZ you are trying to excuse gluttony by saying it’s the fault of Food producers. Have you ever been elbowed or shoved out of the way at a buffet – I have on plenty of occasions. You’re only safe if you stand by green salads. Gluttons are gluttons for any food / every food – the more fat and carbohydrates the better. Just not salads. This has nothing to do with with food producers – their products just happen to be some of the items that gluttons are gluttons for. It’s a behavioural issue that could possibly be assisted with some early nutrition education – so … back to my original comment.

            • Blazer

               /  March 17, 2017

              @Maureen../..priceless…’Have you ever been elbowed or shoved out of the way at a buffet – I have on plenty of occasions.’Bol.

            • You’re focus on “gluttony” seems downright medieval and kinda creepy IMHO Maureen …

              The converse of “gluttons are gluttons” might also be true, gluttons are victims of food producers and marketers and social conditioning …

              Obese P1: “What did you have each lunchtime from the tuck-shop at your high school?”

              Obese P2: “Orh, ya know … meat pies and doughnuts … caramel slices, chocolate bars and ice-cream, Coke, Fanta or Sprite.”

              Yes there’s a behavioural component … but its not entirely a behavioural issue … not unless you’re willing to count those who are eager to put copious, unnecessary amounts of fat, sugar, salt and chemicals into processed food they manufacture … They’ve got behavioural problems too … don’t they …?

              After all, AVARICE is also a deadly sin …

      • Griff

         /  March 17, 2017

        @ Anonymous Coward
        The USA corn syrup market is crony capitalism AKA pork barrel politics .
        The government guarantee a minimum price and provides subsidized crop insurance.
        http://grist.org/food/our-crazy-farm-subsidies-explained/
        When NZ done away with subsidizes our farmers became better at innovation , more focused on providing what the market wants and devolving new ones.
        In the USA if you change from maize/ soy etc you have to pay back any subsides you have received in the last ten years. This makes their farming sector locked into inefficient production.

        I agree that heavily proceed food is bad.
        My father had type 2 diabetes. I switched his diet away from white bread, white sugar and other over processed pap..His diabetes symptoms and need for medication was gone in a matter of months .

        Reply
  6. Zedd

     /  March 17, 2017

    promote bicycle riding.. esp. children !

    having lived o’seas, I’ve notice how most kiwis, seem to think they need to go everywhere in their cars, even to the corner dairy (50 yards away ?)

    btw; before you ask.. i dont own a car, I walk & ride buses 😀

    Reply
  7. Gezza

     /  March 17, 2017

    Why are Omega plums always so hard to come by, available for such a short time, & so expensive? Also, so small again this year? The local New World’s are only golf ball size. They’re like NZ-grown Satsuma Ez peel mandarins. Chronically delicious.

    Reply
  8. Not sure what there is to crow about regarding Coke Zero, Diet Coke, Pepsi’s and other zero or low sugar alternatives …

    “Diet Coke and Coke Zero appear to be identical. Both contain no kilojoules (Calories) and no sugar. Both are artificially sweetened with (the same amount) of aspartame and acesulfame K and therefore have the same ‘sweetness’”

    http://foodwatch.com.au/blog/additives-and-labels/item/q-what-s-the-difference-between-diet-coke-and-coke-zero.html

    At least sugar is natural …

    These producers are apparently also using the natural plant [herb?] extract Stevia, which is being questioned on a number of issues … possible effects on fertility … and no compensation for the South American indigenous peoples from whence it was originally sourced …

    ttps://www.occupycorporatism.com/coke-pepsi-new-stevia-sweetened-drinks-contain-dangerous-ingredient/

    https://actions.sumofus.org/a/stevia-coca-cola

    Reply
  1. What to do about obesity? – NZ Conservative Coalition

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