Backward politics

I don’t know if this is part of the official Labour Party feud with the Maori Party, or one Labour candidate being nasty. Tamati Coffey:

CoffeyBackward

Coffey is Labour’s candidate for the Maori electorate Waiariki this year:

About

My name is Tamati Coffey and I am the Labour Candidate for Waiariki electorate in 2017. Authorised by Andrew Kirton, 160 Willis St, Wellington.

I don’t know of Kirton authorised his backward swipe at his opponent via that same Facebook account.

Coffey will be standing against Te Ururoa Flavell in Waiariki, who won against a different Labour candidate by 3,889 votes in 2014, with Mana’s Annette Sykes a close third about 350 votes back.

Mana won’t stand this year in an agreement with the Maori party so Coffey will have to do something extraordinary this year to stand a chance. Playing the backward card is unlikely to help his chances in the electorate. It will be interesting to see what sort of list position Labour give him – reward or not.

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34 Comments

  1. Bill Brown

     /  2nd April 2017

    He should have stuck to doing the weather

    Reply
  2. Two hours later the post is still up on Facebook. The Labour Party is either happy with it or hasn’t woken up yet.

    Reply
    • PDB

       /  2nd April 2017

      Will Labour ever learn that generally New Zealand voters don’t like negative attack politics?

      Apart from Andrew Little saying Maori should vote Labour (presumably due to historic ties) have they actually laid out a case for why Maori would be better off under a Labour led govt?

      Reply
    • Looks like it has been deleted now, some time between two and four hours after being posted.

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  2nd April 2017

        The fact it’s been deleted now suggests *Head Office* got wind of it & said get rid of it, and/or he got a lot tweets that weren’t complimentary & they upset the poor wee chap.

        If it was pulled on orders from H.O. that’s pretty hypocritical of them, given they’re making a determined effort to denigrate the Maori Party themselves.

        I actually don’t see it as much of a sin, if at all. I thought it was quite witty – like National’s rowboat one. If he said that, on a marae, or at a debate, where Te Ururoa was present, Te Ururoa would grin from ear to ear, I reckon, & have some similar comeback when his turn came to speak.

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  2nd April 2017

          (Marama might be another story & they might need the firehose there.) 😬

          Reply
  3. Blazer

     /  2nd April 2017

    Attack politics have worked very well for National ,so its hard to fathom that NZ voters don’t like them.From Muldoons dancing Cossacks to the Brash Iwi/Kiwi campaign and Keys Lab/Green rowers ,the evidence …is compelling that PDB…is…wrong.

    Reply
    • Bill Brown

       /  2nd April 2017

      PDB is wrong !

      Reply
    • PDB

       /  2nd April 2017

      ‘Dancing Cossacks’ was a totally different era/age so a poor example – the rowing TV campaign from National was subtle in its approach and not at all similar to the left-wing’s constant personal attacks of John Key, or the direct attack on the Maori party from Coffey above.

      Reply
      • Blazer

         /  2nd April 2017

        you missed the Kiwi/Iwi example and while you are there,what personal attacks on Key as part of electioneering were undertaken by …Labour?

        Reply
        • PDB

           /  2nd April 2017

          Last time I looked Brash didn’t become PM so why do you think Kiwi/Iwi was successful?

          Reply
          • Blazer

             /  2nd April 2017

            because it raised the % of the Natz vote so high,the election was a close call.

            Reply
            • PDB

               /  2nd April 2017

              The Orewa speech jumped National in the polls, a speech that was based on what Brash saw as a divisive race relations policy. Was this an attack on an individual or particular party, or was it an attack on a particular direction the country was taking?

              Coffey here is directly calling out and attacking a political party – generally the voters don’t like that sort of stuff. The fact it comes from a Labour party person whose party can’t even get their own act together will only get more people’s backs up.

          • Kitty Catkin

             /  2nd April 2017

            sighhhhhh…..the Cossacks were NOT Communists (Muldoon should have known this, it’s common knowledge) but fought for the other side against the Bolsheviks….

            Reply
            • Blazer

               /  2nd April 2017

              *sigh*..no one has suggested the Cossacks…were Communists.

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  2nd April 2017

              Why were they on the ad, then ? Look at the ad, and you will see that, while it may not use the word, nobody could mistake what it’s getting at. Everything becomes state-owned, the map goes red ‘and we all know what that’s called. don’t we ?’ Enter Cossacks. I would see that as suggesting that there wa a link between Cossacks and Communism.

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  2nd April 2017

              Watch the ad. Just after the voice has told us that Labour could own the whole country, it says ‘And we all know what that’s called (or ‘that is’), don’t we ?’ as the Cossacks dance on.I don’t think that we are meant to think that they are the Waikikamukau Folk Dancing Club.

              That ad was only on twice-once seen, never forgotten.

            • PDB

               /  2nd April 2017

              Don’t worry Kitty, you are right and Blazer is once again……………wrong.

              Wikipedia: “Following this, the narrator says, “And you know what that’s called, don’t you?” Then, several Cossacks dance across the screen in front of a concerned-looking man, representing the Soviet Union and to imply the answer to the question was communism (despite the fact that the Cossacks were traditionally opponents to the communist Bolsheviks).”

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  2nd April 2017

              Thank you, Comrade.Yes, the implication was certainly that the Cossacks were Communists-even though the word is used nowhere in the ad. I couldn’t believe that the ad was only shown twice-it is probably the most memorable one ever made. I have read how few seconds the Cossacks are on the screen.

              The Cossacks would have been as mad as wasps to be considered Bolsheviks/Communists, and when the Cossacks were angry, they did things like… (faints at memory of Gorky’s Taras Bulba)

            • Blazer

               /  2nd April 2017

              nothing whatsoever to do with the discussion topic…period.

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  2nd April 2017

              This sort of discussion is not limited to a single period, it was not I who first mentioned the Cossacks or widened the period of time being talked about.

            • Blazer

               /  2nd April 2017

              @KC…read the topic,read the thread …..what you think about dancing Cossacks is not relevant.

  4. Blazer

     /  2nd April 2017

    you are trying to narrow things down to one aspiring Labour candidate.The reason you are doing this, is because you cannot substantiate your original…premise.

    Reply
    • PDB

       /  2nd April 2017

      I’ve just taken apart all your ‘examples’ above – far better for you to ignore that fact however……

      Reply
      • Blazer

         /  2nd April 2017

        except you have not.You dismiss Muldoon/Nationals attack politics success as belonging to another era…fail….you dismiss Brash’s campaign and Ansells Iwi/Kiwi attack strategy as irrelevant,=fail,and re rate Keys rowers as ‘subtle.=another…fail…3 out of 3 and zero evidence of Labours personal attack campaign on…Key=4/4.

        Reply
  5. Petty, mean-spirited, exhibiting disloyalty to and mocking a party that has achieved significant gains for minority ethnicity and our first people . Hmmm, let me think Tamiti. What have Labour done for Māori this past decade? Yep – zero, nil, nothing….

    Great political play. Not seeing it.

    Reply
  6. Nelly Smickers

     /  2nd April 2017

    I guess *Tamati* would know a thing or two about taking taking NZ backwards as well 😡

    Reply
  7. Gezza

     /  2nd April 2017

    Attack politics are the norm in NZ. They all do it. In the House, electioneering, press releases, speeches – sometimes it’s direct, sometimes it’s indirect – dog whistling – sometimes it’s personal. Lot of fuss over nothing.

    Reply
  1. Backward politics – News2Discuss

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