Controversial RMA reforms passed into law

Yesterday the third reading vote passed the controversial RMA reforms into law but 1 vote.

National have been determined to get the RMA through this term. When David Seymour (ACT) and Peter Dunne (UF) had objections to some parts of the bill National turned to the Maori Party to get it over the line.

But RMA reforms causing tensions over race relations

Tensions over race relations have been to the fore as the Government’s managed to pass its RMA reforms into law thanks to backing from the Maori Party.

ACT leader David Seymour said the reforms won’t do nothing for housing affordability, nor will it do nothing for land supply and the building of new dwellings, but it will be close enough to nothing.

“It will be close enough to nothing that he has wasted two and a half years of his ministerial time and much of this houses time bringing a bill that is two steps backward for each one step forward.”

Labour MP David Parker’s slammed the Government for using the housing crisis to drive its RMA reforms, calling it dishonest.

“Blaming the RMA and planners for the tax biases and the inequality that’s driven home ownership in New Zealand to the lowest level since the 1950s for over 60 years is just wrong.”

I thought it is widely understood  that the housing shortage is in large part due to RMA restrictions on new subdivisions and building. It has become too easy for people to oppose building, and getting resource consent can be time consuming and expensive – and at risk of failing.

Most parties supported RMA reform, including Labour, but didn’t support the full package that National wanted.

New Zealand First’s maintained a vocal opposition to new iwi participation measures in RMA rules with party deputy leader Ron Mark arguing one law for all should apply.

“We are all created equal in God’s eyes and nothing in legislation will ever change that no how many flip flops Mr Nick Smith makes.”

An odd comment from Mark that was smacked down by Maori Party co-leader Marama Fox:

“I find that last contribution quite ironic from the man who was the chief treaty negotiator for Ngati Kahungunu ki Wairarapa.”

National have defended the result of their collusion with the Maori Party by slanging back.

Environment Minister Nick Smith has accused those of opposing the Bill of doing the country a disservice.

“They quibbled at the edges, they tried to manufacture myths, but they’ve been unable to amount any credible argument against the substantive reforms in this bill, in fact they barely mentioned them.”

But, although reform was widely supported, others had serious concerns about some of the quibbly edge bits.

Smith would have to be one of the worst Government negotiators ever.

While the RMA reforms may or may not bother most voters (more likely not) the deal making done by National is likely to be used to slam the Maori Party in the election campaign,

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10 Comments

  1. Corky

     /  7th April 2017

    National had it all…. an election.budget, a surplus, a chance to re enter Pike River and a fool leading the Labour Party. And National pissed it all against the wall. Who’s the fool now?

    Basic logic time. National wanted changes to the RMA to speed and streamline consent process and improve housing stocks. But simultaneously they have given Maori a chance to slow those processes down again by demanding consultation with councils before any consents are appproved.

    The hangi fires will burn bright this weekend as Maori elite decide how best to wield their new power and gain maximum financial benefit on or off the books. I can see deals being done by councils, developers and private citizens just to get a process going before the actual process starts.

    Remember Bob Jones having to consult with iwi before he replaced his office window? What about the sacred stones holding up roading in the New Plymouth area? Or the Taniwha demanding a highway be built around it. Or the Wanganui River now being a person with its own lawyers? Expect much more of this bs.

    National may have started a race war……while the content, well fed slobs, know as New Zealanders slept. Maybe National aren’t that dumb after all.

    Reply
    • Conspiratoor

       /  7th April 2017

      Spot on brother corks, the gravy train rolls on. english is toast, this is winstons to lose

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  7th April 2017

        Hard to say. Might depend who gets the Maori seats yet. Wish someone would poll just the Maori electorates.

        Reply
        • Corky

           /  7th April 2017

          Winnies offered to repeal it. That will be difficult. If he fleshes out how he will do that,
          he will get my vote after I swallow a dead rat.

          Reply
      • John Schmidt

         /  7th April 2017

        What a great idea. We need a parliment full of hairdressers and fast food cooks to be our leaders.
        A vote for Winnie is a vote for those who cannot make it on any other party list because they are simply not good enough. People wanting Winne do not even realise what they are wishing for to be our leaders, incredible.

        Reply
  2. Alan Wilkinson

     /  7th April 2017

    The only thing worse than putting Smith in charge of this problem was actually letting him do something about it. Seymour is on the button.

    Reply
  3. Corky

     /  7th April 2017

    Hobsons Peldge view:

    https://www.whaleoil.co.nz/2017/04/rma-new-zealanders-now-official-two-people/

    Can’t wait to see Parti’s water bill in 2 years time. I bet he goes from: ‘some of my best friends are Maori’ to, ‘bloody Maoris.’A quite common phenomenon when Europeans learn about the ‘real world.’ from real world experiences

    Reply
  4. Corky

     /  7th April 2017

    Just thought of a contradiction…..the Maori Party support GM free regions with such designations out of central government hands. But Nick ”the traitor” Smith doesn’t.
    And the Maori Party support Nick. This is a case of a taniwha with two tongues.

    Reply
  1. Controversial RMA reforms passed into law – NZ Conservative Coalition

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