Media watch – Saturday

15 April 2017

MediaWatch

Media Watch is a focus on New Zealand media, blogs and social media. You can post any items of interested related to media.

A primary aim here is to hold media to account in the political arena. A credible and questioning media is an essential part of a healthy democracy.

A general guideline – post opinion on or excerpts from and links to blog posts or comments of interest, whether they are praise, criticism, pointing out issues or sharing useful information.

As usual avoid anything that could cause any legal issues such as potential defamation or breaching suppression orders. Also remember that keeping things civil, legal and factual is more credible and effective.

41 Comments

  1. patupaiarehe

     /  April 15, 2017

    Interesting…
    http://www.stuff.co.nz/auckland/91590161/avondale-jewellery-shop-under-fire-for-burqa-ban

    Auckland councillor Cathy Casey laid a complaint with the Human Rights Commission on Friday, after a photo of the sign at Avondale’s Coffee and Gems store was emailed to her.
    But the store’s owner Louise Brinsden defended her sign, saying it was erected for safety “years ago” after a man disguised in a burqa “pulled a machete out on another customer”.

    Please correct me if I am wrong, but my understanding is that the followers of Islam are instructed to “Dress modestly”, not disguise their identity.

    “We are a shop that buys and sells, by law we have to be able to identify the person we are purchasing from therefore no facial coverings are permitted,” Brinsden said.
    “With a female staff base therefore it is our duty to keep our staff safe and this sign coupled with electronic entry and exit doors have been installed as a wider safety precaution.
    “We have no issue with hijabs as we can identify the person.”

    It will be interesting to see what becomes of this…

  2. High Flying Duck

     /  April 15, 2017

    A bit of Muslim fun going on in Australia…Saw it on WO but thought it was worth reposting here.
    Sydney’s completely different to NZ though…isn’t it?

  3. Zedd

     /  April 15, 2017

    more sabre rattling from DPRK (nth K).. 105th birthday celebration of Kim il-sun (grand-father of the nation). There are suggestions another ‘nuke-test’ is being scheduled ?

    Meanwhile USA send a ‘battle-fleet’ to join ROK (sth K) for ‘war games’. :/

  4. Zedd

     /  April 15, 2017

    Mr T might think he can unilaterally start dropping the ‘MOAB bomb’, here there & everywhere.. but if he steps up to really using nukes.. he may find the ‘game’ will change; China, Russia & Pakistan have them too !

    • Gezza

       /  April 15, 2017

      Today’s Inside Story is discussing the US’s use of the MOAB, Zedd.

      Presenter: Sohail Rahman
      Guests:
      Mirwais Yasini – Member of the Afghan parliament, representing Nangarhar province where the bomb was dropped
      Omar Samad – Former senior adviser to Afghanistan’s chief executive
      Vyacheslav Matuzov – a former Russian diplomat

      • Gezza

         /  April 16, 2017

        This one’s not worth watching Zedd. I’d give it an F. Omar Samad was the only one who talked any sense. The Afghan MP was all over the show & his English wasn’t great. The Russian guy was a total loser.

    • You’d seriously back them against the US?

  5. Gezza

     /  April 15, 2017

    Currently screening to the English-speaking world on Al Jazeera, probably several times this month. Freeview Channel 16

    REWIND – NEW ZEALAND
    Locked Up Warriors: New Zealand’s Prison Problem
    New Zealand’s imprisonment rates are among the worst in the developed world. We revisit a Maori family to examine why.

    Despite its reputation for social justice and equality, New Zealand has one of the highest rates of imprisonment in the western world.

    One in two prisoners are indigenous Maori, even though they account for just 15 percent of the population. Maori are overrepresented in all sectors of the criminal justice system because of soaring rates of child poverty, school dropout, unemployment and family breakdown within indigenous communities.

    Affiliation to US-style biker gangs also plays a part because gangs are seen as surrogate families. The first overseas chapters of Hells Angels were established in New Zealand. Over the decades gangs have become involved in violent crime, drug trafficking and brutal gang rapes. 

    In response, the New Zealand prison system introduced cultural units and innovative programmes that try to connect Maori with their families instead of the gangs. These programmes also encourage prisoners to get back in touch with their cultural ancestry by learning traditions such as the Haka – the Maori warrior dance. But only half of the men in these units speak with their family and re-establishing that bond is not an easy task.  

    In 2013, 101 East visited New Zealand – getting rare access to both prisons and the criminal underworld – to investigate why this peaceful South Pacific nation has one of the highest rates of incarceration in the Western world.

    Four years on, REWIND returns to New Zealand to find out what became of Sirius Anderson, a young boy featured in the film who dreamed of one day becoming president of the Mongrel Mob.

    http://www.aljazeera.com/programmes/rewind/2017/04/locked-warriors-zealand-prison-problem-170409142533126.html

    • patupaiarehe

       /  April 15, 2017

      We discussed this the other day G. The ‘Maori’ who are imprisoned, do not represent ‘Maori culture’, they are ‘Maori’ by default. And they give ‘Maori culture’ a bad name, despite having no involvement with it…

      • Gezza

         /  April 15, 2017

        I haven’t watched it yet patu.

        • patupaiarehe

           /  April 15, 2017

          Neither have I, G. I don’t need to.

          • Gezza

             /  April 15, 2017

            Fairy nuff. I probably will. See what they have to say about us & whether they cover any of the good work now being done with young offenders by various marae in several places that Possum mentioned.

            • patupaiarehe

               /  April 15, 2017

              ‘Fairy nuff’, alright. The ‘marae solution’, only involves those who are already involved in their local marae. Which means that the ‘criminals by ethnicity’, will continue to give good honest brown folk, a bad name….

            • Gezza

               /  April 15, 2017

              Yeah, I agree. What do you reckon needs to be done to break the ones not connected to any marae out of the crime cycle? Especially those in gangs like BP or the Mongies, or wanting to join them?

            • patupaiarehe

               /  April 15, 2017

              Couldn’t say G. Perhaps introduce them to music? It seems to keep my teenagers out of trouble…

            • Gezza

               /  April 15, 2017

              Winston’s got a few ideas …

              24 March 2017
              Northland Rt Hon Winston Peters Crime
              To battle widespread criminal behaviour by young people socially DNA-ed for destruction as seen in Kaikohe last weekend, New Zealand First will, among other measures, repeal the anti-smacking law.

              “We live in a ‘PC age’ where there are more rules on the teachers and the police than young offenders and their parents,” said Mr Peters in a speech at Waipu this morning.

              “We no longer hold these little ‘tow-rag’ offenders responsible for their actions.

              “Instead we hear 100 different reasons why it’s not their fault.
              “That’s rubbish.
              “They’re old enough to know exactly what they’re doing.
              “They know they will get away with it and that there will be no repercussions.
              ”Meanwhile, the old parties in parliament want the age of criminal responsibility raised.

              “Many of these politicians have no idea how the other half live and don’t venture into the real world.

              “Besides repealing the anti-smacking law, which doesn’t work and has in fact seen greater violence towards children, New Zealand First will lower the age of criminal responsibility; change social welfare to demand parental accountability and will make sure there are far more police on the frontline – 1800 more as soon as they can be trained.

              “We will return this country to what other generations knew: That crime doesn’t pay,” said Mr Peters.

              http://www.nzfirst.org.nz/tags/crime

            • patupaiarehe

               /  April 15, 2017

              That ‘horse’, has well & truly ‘bolted’, G. What this country needs now, is ‘castle laws’, that get a couple of good honest working people, off a murder/manslaughter charge, when they beat the piss out of some miscreant, who invades their home.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  April 15, 2017

              I expect your teenagers can read properly, patu? Most of those in prison can’t. Also 60% have a mental health problems. Dealing with these basic and crippling issues is surely fundamental but maybe music might be a route to enabling that.

            • Gezza

               /  April 15, 2017

              If you don’t like that one, he has others.

            • Gezza

               /  April 15, 2017

              Darroch Ball Social Development Youth Affairs Crime
              30 March 2017

              New Zealand First is proposing a radical overhaul of the youth justice system in a new member’s bill which will introduce a demerit points system for youth offenders.
              “This type of demerit points system structure will outline stricter enforcement measures similar to what is effectively used with traffic offences,” says Social Development Spokesperson Darroch Ball.

              “In the current youth justice system large numbers of youth think they can get away scot-free and face few, if any, real consequences – our new demerit points system will combat that.

              “There will be tiered levels of consequences depending on the type of crime and the number of demerit points accrued.

              “The bill will make sure youth offenders are held to account for their actions swiftly and early. It identifies those who need guidance sooner and provides them with support.

              “It also gives ‘one-time offenders’ an opportunity to learn from their mistakes.

              “Police will no longer have one hand tied behind their backs when dealing with these persistent and serious offenders, and they will avoid the ‘catch and release’ scenarios that currently frustrate them,” says Mr Ball.

            • Gezza

               /  April 15, 2017

              20 March 2017
              Northland Rt Hon Winston Peters Crime
              The first step to cutting crime in Kaikohe, where youth have been on yet another rampage, is to boost the police strength, says New Zealand First Leader Northland MP and Rt Hon Winston Peters.

              “The thin blue line has been broken by this government – once we have it restored, and identify the culprits, a serious focus must go on the families involved.

              “The youth justice age should not have been raised, as National did last year. The offenders should be taking responsibility for their action.

              “We revealed last year that of Northland’s 22stations, only seven had more than a single officer on continuous duty over four consecutive Fridays and Saturdays.

              “So for Northland, a vast area of New Zealand with some 156,000 people, we could only average 43 police on duty at 7am and again at 11pm. At one occasion it peaked at 67, but on another, it was only 17 on duty.

              “Around the country there were 208 ‘ghost’ stations where there was not one officer on over those four weekends.

              “Since 2008, reported criminal offences in Northland have leapt 66% from 11,593 in 2008 to over 19,274 last year. Yet over the same time arrests fell from 3,144 in 2008, to 2,735 in 2015.

              “Additional police data lays bare the truth about National’s police neglect that is being replicated all over provincial New Zealand. In Northland it is so bad that burglars stand a 97% chance of getting away with it in Northland and we must ask how many serious crimes are going unreported.

              “We need more police working in our communities and not just the large towns.

              “New Zealand First is committed to doing just that with 1800 extra police as soon as they can be trained,” says Mr Peters.

            • patupaiarehe

               /  April 15, 2017

              Whatever G. Bring in as many new cops as you like, and not one of them will make a shit of a difference, to the honest farmer who lives an hour away from the nearest police station. ‘Castle laws’, give that farmer immunity from prosecution, if he kills someone who is threatening him, or his family.

            • patupaiarehe

               /  April 15, 2017

              The ‘thumbs’ say that we have an ‘offender’ amongst us, who doesn’t fancy being shot. He knows how to ensure his safety…

            • Gezza

               /  April 16, 2017

              So, apart from the extra police idea, which I think is a good one, because it might get police back into community policing, you think NZ First’s other two ideas are probably useless for dealing with this problem?

              I reckon they are.

    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  April 15, 2017

      Perhaps this British study gives some clues about what life skills need to be taught by parents and schools:

      emotional stability, determination, control, optimism and conscientiousness are the foundation stones of building a fruitful life.
      People in their 50s and 60s who scored highly in at least four of the five attributes were generally wealthier, less depressed, healthy and connected to a large social circle.
      In contrast those who achieved two or fewer of the skills were often lonely, depressed and were far more likely to suffer from chronic diseases.

      http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2017/04/10/scientists-find-5-life-skills-bring-health-wealth-success/

    • Gezza

       /  April 15, 2017

      Soz, the link above was just to text, not the page with the video. Here’s the doco itself for any who IS interested. 25 mins

      • patupaiarehe

         /  April 15, 2017

        I’m not allowed to own firearms G, so watching that sort of thing just frustrates me….

        • Gezza

           /  April 16, 2017

          Just makes me sad mate. So much needs to be done to change the situation. I want to get rid of the gangs. But the kids need something better to belong to. So do their mums & dads. And jobs.

          • Gezza

             /  April 16, 2017

            And affordable houses. And a stake in the community, any good community.

            • patupaiarehe

               /  April 16, 2017

              Exactly G. I’d love to see it myself-

            • Gezza

               /  April 16, 2017

              The three R’s, jobs, jobs, jobs, roof over the head, feeling like you’ve got value, having your kids look up to you because you’ve got those things. They had them where I come from until all the freezing works closed.

            • patupaiarehe

               /  April 16, 2017

              So how does one make the alternative appealing…??

            • Gezza

               /  April 16, 2017

              See above. If they’ve got those, it’d improve.

            • patupaiarehe

               /  April 16, 2017

              I get it G. A job is never just a job. Hanging out with like minded individuals, from your community, builds a community. Unpleasant work, is far more bearable, when you are surrounded by good buggers, who want to earn an honest dolllar, much like yourself…

            • Gezza

               /  April 16, 2017

              Yes. And when you’re surrounded by workmates from your own iwi & hapu, all is well. Regions need jobs. These people then have real choices. Marae would welcome them home with open hearts if they want to reconnect. And be happy to keep in touch if they want to work in the city. We all want somewhere to belong. Somewhere to go home to. Someone to love us.

            • Gezza

               /  April 16, 2017

              My opinion anyway. Time for me to pretend to sleep. Ka kite ano e hoa.

            • patupaiarehe

               /  April 16, 2017

              Exactly G. I have worked for ‘corporates’ before, and I’ll never do it again. I’ve always been respected by ‘my masters’, due to being qualified, and getting on well with those who are supposedly ‘beneath me’. The way that most companies treat the labourers, is nothing short of disgusting. A man might not be ‘the sharpest tool in the shed’, but he wants to do an honest days work, and get paid for it. A good manager delegates tasks, in order of capability. And if that manager does his job correctly, everyone goes home, safe and well, knowing they have earned their pay…

            • patupaiarehe

               /  April 16, 2017

              I can’t get this song ‘out of my head’… You’re welcome 😀

            • patupaiarehe

               /  April 16, 2017

              I should probably confess, that the last time I did ‘voluntary’ community work, was shortly after I got convicted for ‘Driving when I shouldn’t have’ 😀