ANZAC Day 2017

25 April 2017

We all have our own ways of doing ANZAC Day and remembering those New Zealanders (and Australians) who served and died overseas in the two World Wars as well as in other conflicts.

Post what you remember and feel about ANZAC Day here.

(This is a pre-ANZAC post that will be carried forward tomorrow)

ANZAC

Missy posted about a visit to Ypres in Belgium last August:

Past ANZAC Day posts:

“New Zealand Soldier” became the “OFFICIAL SONG” of “THE NEW ZEALAND ARMY”.
Dedicated to all those Men and Women who served in the First and Second World Wars and whom are currently serving in the New Zealand Armed Forces:

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24 Comments

  1. Brown

     /  24th April 2017

    Grandad survived the Western Front (he was a machine gunner) and died in Feb 1919 as part of the army of occupation in Germany. He is buried in Cologne. Darned flue killed what bullets, shells etc… narrowly missed or just clipped. Life is fleeting and you often won’t see your death cards being dealt. My Dad was only two when Grandad went overseas. I think he always wondered about him as he became old enough to know although the marriage would have folded up had he returned because Grandma was a bit (lot) of a hussey. I know life was pretty tough for him as a child but not so for his illegitimate younger brother who had the best of everything because his dad was wealthy and paid for my uncle’s everything – it never filtered down though and Grandma always liked the gravy train child more despite him ignoring her as he grew old. Dad never got the UE of those days because he was moved about a lot and his schooling was patchy so, while intelligent and a natural pilot, was not acceptable for aircrew in WW2 despite being permanent airforce from about 1939. That may have saved his life (he served overseas for a year but life was not particularly dangerous as ground crew by late 1943) so maybe there was a sliver lining in the hardships. I bet there’s thousands of stories just like this where the war changed things in the blink of an eye.

    Some photos hang on my wall and they are not forgotten.

    Reply
  2. duperez

     /  24th April 2017

    I always drag this out in April:

    Reply
  3. “Though nations trek from progress … trek from progress …. trek from progress …”

    Reply
  4. patupaiarehe

     /  24th April 2017

    Yup, I’ll be ‘booting’ my many offspring in the backside tomorrow, at around 5am. It’s a five minute walk, from our home to the dawn service. What I enjoy most, is watching dawn develop into day. And reflecting on how much different the day might be, if historical events had ended differently. My kids enjoy it, as much as they enjoy any time we spend together. The eldest four take it seriously, and appreciate what it means. I’m hoping our youngest stays asleep this year. Yelling “I’m bored!”, at a dawn service, might bring a few chuckles from those around you, but is a tad embarrassing, as a parent… 😀

    Reply
    • patupaiarehe

       /  24th April 2017

      Funny, I searched youtube for the ‘US military version’, of the recent cover by ‘Disturbed’, of ‘The sound of silence’, with no luck. Except for this….

      Reply
  5. Missy

     /  25th April 2017

    One of my Grandfathers was in the Home Guard during the second world war as he was too old to join up, my other Grandfather wanted to join up but was refused as he worked on the railway and as a worker for an essential service he was exempt from Military Service, it is something that affected him for the rest of his life, he always felt a little bit less of a man as he hadn’t done his bit in the war. Two of his uncles fought in WWI and one died in Belgium, he was very influenced by the postcards and letters he received from his uncles during the war.

    For me I go to Dawn Service (will be going again tomorrow) to not only remember those that died in all conflict (including a friend) but also to honour those that have served and survived, and that are still serving.

    This year I will attend both Dawn Service (at Hyde Park Corner) and the service at Westminster Abbey in London.

    Reply
  6. Missy

     /  25th April 2017

    From the NZ High Commission Facebook page. A recording of the poem in Flanders Fields by NZ and Australian Military Personnel in London to mark the centenary of the Flanders Offensive, which will be commemorated this year.

    https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FAustralianHighCommissionUK%2Fvideos%2F1437282029912554%2F&show_text=0&width=560

    Reply
  7. Missy

     /  25th April 2017

    Well All, have a good Anzac Day – however you commemorate it, I am off for an early night before a very long day (18+ hours on the go I think).

    Lest we Forget.

    Reply
  8. I don’t usually care about ticks, but I’ve gone through and up ticked every comment so far posted on this thread. I value these comments, especially on a topic such as important to New Zealand as ANZAC Day.

    I up ticked to balance out a solitary down tick on each comment. Someone (one sick minded person) has down ticked everything so far.

    That sort of petty negativity keeps reinforcing my resolve to keep Your NZ going as a forum for open opinion and experience sharing and robust debate. The gutless down ticker reminds me why it is important to continue.

    Reply
    • Missy

       /  26th April 2017

      Pete, thanks (not for me personally but for everyone who has shared something personal about Anzac Day). I don’t know what kind of sad, nasty, mean spirited person would down tick these sort of comments without the guts to justify it by posting a reason why, but whoever they are should be ashamed!

      Reply
  9. Reply
  10. Gezza

     /  25th April 2017

    Dad was a machine gunner in World War 2. He volunteered. He fired a Vickers, also used a Browning. He served in North Africa & Italy & was invalided home from Cassino. He loved the Vickers. It was water cooled and could fire for long periods without needing barrel changes. He hardly ever spoke about the war & if he did it was mainly about amusing things that happened. He & others especially hated & feared the German 88 mm gun. The Africa Corps were particularly fast and accurate with this gun which could usually take out any tank with one shot from long distance. He received a field promotion after rescuing a wounded comrade under fire. The man who went with him was shot dead before they got back under cover. He said he would never do it again. He died 11 years ago. He is buried in a soldiers plot with mum. My brother & sister up home went to the Dawn Parade. Big bro has his medals & wears them. They will visit them & text me for a rememberance message as always. The local ANZAC Parade will pass my house just before they assemble outside the nearby RSA clubrooms & dismiss. It never gets any smaller – kids make up the numbers as the old soldiers leave us. RIP old soldier.

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  25th April 2017

      The parade dismissed at 10.15 am after the wreaths were laid at the memorial from Army, Air Force, Navy, Police, Fire Service & Scouts & Pipe Band leader. It was bigger than last year.

      Reply
    • Gezza

       /  25th April 2017

      Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  25th April 2017

        May future horrendous bloodshed be averted by asking the right questions soon enough.

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  25th April 2017

          Yes. While we honour their sacrifice, & the parades make me emotional, it has passed into mythology. So many conscripted lives were just thrown away by callous generals being sent into shells & machine gun fire for the sake of a few hundred yards. Gallipoli was a disaster that achieved nothing but death. I asked Dad why he volunteered. It wasn’t patriotism. He was young & adventurous & he had no idea what was coming.

          Reply
  11. Corky

     /  25th April 2017

    To all the men and women who fought to give us a way of life few enjoy, I thank you.

    Thinking of you today
    Corky

    Reply
  12. Blazer

     /  25th April 2017

    hard to even envisage what the ANZACS went through.I guess most of us , don’t even know we’re alive today ,when it comes to hardship and sacrifice.A tribute to courage and a timely reminder for those with the ‘nuke em’ mentality.

    Reply
  13. duperez

     /  25th April 2017

    One historian this morning talked of the perspectives past the traditional narratives. She said (paraphrased) that if two and a half million signed up there were two and a half reasons for. Individuals with stories.
    Oldies might remember this meandering, sad piece.

    “… Did I see you march to the train? Did I cry was my nose red?
    My two day bride can you feel me in your memory?
    I will be the redness in your iron fire
    How could I write? My words would seem sad or gay

    We regret to inform you …

    … Now she sits in her brother’s widow’s house
    Her skin like a lizard her aura like a daffodil
    Sits like a sign in the children’s chair
    Migrant guest from relative to in-law
    She stares into the embers.”

    http://www.metrolyrics.com/darling-belle-lyrics-incredible-string-band.html

    Reply
  14. Anonymous Coward

     /  25th April 2017

    For the last few years, and for all of the ones to come, I listen to this song. Off Let England Shake by P J Harvey, one of three songs about Gallipoilii on the Album.

    Reply
  15. Anonymous Coward

     /  25th April 2017

    Reply
  16. Anonymous Coward

     /  25th April 2017

    Reply

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