Jackson and English on Ngaro nonsense

The fallout from Alfred Ngaro’s comments, seen as political threats against critics of the Government, continues today.

Ngaro’s apology was inadequate – see Ngaro apologises, sort of.

Steven Joyce said this morning that Ngaro had apologised ‘to anyone who might have been offended’ that sort of non-apology is often used and often condemned.

RNZ: Jackson refuses to be silenced by Ngaro ‘threat’

Labour Party candidate Willie Jackson says he won’t be keeping his mouth shut, despite an apparent threat from a cabinet minister.

Associate Minister of Social Housing Alfred Ngaro told the National Party’s Auckland Conference on the weekend there could be financial consequences for the Manukau Urban Māori Authority if Mr Jackson bagged the government on the campaign trail.

Mr Jackson heads the authority, which runs one charter school and is the largest provider of Whānau Ora services in South Auckland.

Mr Jackson told Morning Report Mr Ngaro’s comments were “unprecedented” and “very disappointing”.

“I’ve never heard of a minister threatening a community organisation like this.

“It’s a direct threat and its a worry for me.

“I’ve got over 100 people who work for me and we serve thousands in our community and we have contracts right across the state sector.”

He said it was not just about him, it was about the rights of the community.

He said he was going to write to Prime Minister Bill English demanding assurances that community organisations would lose funding for criticising the government.

Prime Minister Bill English says there will be an audit of Ngaro’s decisions as minister.

Mr English told Morning Report Mr Ngaro’s comments were off the cuff.

He said he was wrong to say what he did and he has since apologised.

He would go back and check through the decisions Mr Ngaro had made to ensure they were not based on the political views of his opponents, Mr English said.

Damage control for National. This sort of thing has the potential to sink a Government ship in election year.

 

 

Next Post
Leave a comment

40 Comments

  1. Gezza

     /  May 15, 2017

    “He said he was going to write to Prime Minister Bill English demanding assurances that community organisations would lose funding for criticising the government.”

    RNZ couldn’t publish many piss-poorer proof-reads than that.

    Reply
    • Corky

       /  May 15, 2017

      Thank our education system. I am also a victim. I continually right bad grammar and punctuation. Seems immigrants aren’t too fussed on our education syllabus either, according to a news item I heard this morning. I have already mentioned the Indian folk I know who have Skype lessons for their kids with a teacher back home.

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  May 15, 2017

        Well hopefully they’ll learn to pronounce a v as a v instead of a w from their friends here.

        I’m not sure why it’s a problem for Indian immigrants who speak otherwise excellent English.

        Reply
        • Corky

           /  May 15, 2017

          ‘I’m not sure why it’s a problem for Indian immigrants who speak otherwise excellent English.”

          From what I understand, when they compare their children’s education in New Zealand with relatives of of similar age in India, they find the Kiwl kids are a least two years behind. academically.

          Reply
  2. Bill Courtney

     /  May 15, 2017

    Clever positioning from Jackson. There are two clear points to score:
    1. Continuing to raise the profile of charter schools as a follow up to the issues discussed last week;
    2. He increases the chances of his second application being successful, regardless of whether it does so on merit, or not, i.e. the government is now damned if you do, damned if you don’t. This is especially clever, given how poorly his first school performed in 2015, its first year of operation. But not that most people know that, given the formal 2015 evaluation is still locked away from public eyes.

    Reply
    • Corky

       /  May 15, 2017

      Willie knows all the tricks to make bureaucracy compliant with his will. You should see his
      ‘union hardman’ persona come to the fore when some pencil necked bureaucrat tries comparing course expenditure and attendance with claimed expenses.

      Reply
  3. Revel

     /  May 15, 2017

    Who cares? Most New Zealanders will be able to see the rort that Jackson has exploited for years. He is the worst kind of bludger around and good on Ngaro for fronting it. About time someone called him on it. I bet for example a provider run by a National Party aligned person wouldn’t even get funding under Labour.

    Reply
  4. I think WE should “go back and check through the decisions our [successive] governments have made to ensure they were not based on the political views of opponents”

    I believe we’d find a veritable plethora of reduced and terminated funding, cutting of services and other distasteful activities based on exactly that … or on the incumbent government’s perception of ‘opposition’ … or on ‘opposition’ to the neoliberal paradigm inherent in people doing ‘community’ things …?

    What else was the massive funding cut in Adult & Community Education back in 2010 …

    http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/education/3323417/Cuts-end-popular-night-classes

    Reply
    • That’s how politics works now in our ‘Market Society’ …

      Now that we no longer have an ethical Public Service …

      Reply
  5. Alan Wilkinson

     /  May 15, 2017

    I don’t recall the media beltway making a fuss when Labour closed private prisons because their union mates objected to competition.

    Reply
    • Blazer

       /  May 15, 2017

      when did this occur..Al?

      Reply
    • I don’t recall a renegade Labour MP putting both his feet in his mouth while he had his head up his arse at the time either Alan …

      Labour passed a legimate Act of Parliament …

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Department_of_Corrections_(New_Zealand)#History

      Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  May 15, 2017

        Yes, Labour passes a lot of legitimate Acts of Parliament to implement its illegitimate protection of its union masters.

        Reply
        • Which are better ‘servants of the people’ do you think Alan …?

          Governments with Corporate masters or Union masters … ?

          The thing is, as I see it, a Corporate puppet government can be wholey and completely anti-union … anti-worker’s rights … anti-collective bargaining … while a Union puppet government can’t be entirely anti-corporate … Indeed, as a consequence, it can’t be entirely and completely pro-Union …

          Workers Unions are a product of exploitative capitalist ‘incorporation’ … not the other way around.

          Reply
  6. Law professor Andrew Geddis: It’s a Sicilian message

    Alfred Ngaro appears to think the Government can stop its critics taking part in government programmes. That’s not just wrong from a political morality standpoint, it’s flat out illegal.

    What no-one seems to have noted, however, is that Ngaro’s apparent threat isn’t just terrible from a political morality standpoint. It would be flat out illegal to do what he is suggesting.

    Like all actions of the executive branch of government, the decision to grant charter school status or distribute Whānau Ora contracts is subject to the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990.

    So if the Government ever were to retaliate against some critical individual or group by refusing it access to a government programme, or blackballing it from future contracts, it would be acting not just wrongly but unlawfully too. Which rather saps the venom from Ngaro’s threat, because I think that there’s no way it could be carried out in the open way needed to send the necessary message.

    Furthermore, I can’t help but wonder if Ngaro has actually all but guaranteed the Manukau Urban Māori Authority’s success in its future applications to participate in government programmes. Because if it does get turned down, there’s a good chance that it would head off to court to challenge that refusal on the basis that it was motivated by unlawful discrimination.

    http://www.pundit.co.nz/content/its-a-sicilian-message

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  May 15, 2017

      Is this Alfred?

      Reply
      • It could be Gezza … but only if he set up the weapon on a time delay mechanism … and then stood in front of its trajectory … like one might a camera for a solo ‘selfie’ …

        Reply
      • Pete Kane

         /  May 15, 2017

        Nelly would have had something wittier.

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  May 15, 2017

          But not more explosive.

          Reply
          • Gezza

             /  May 15, 2017

            Come to think of it – that dude could even be Wayne’s mate Chuck, the LA stunt man.

            Reply
            • Yep … I see distinct similarities between that fella, Ngaro and *Chucky* …

            • Pete Kane

               /  May 15, 2017

              Heard Charles the Duck was very upset by the Nelly Affair. Careful G, could have a coup on your paws!

            • Gezza

               /  May 15, 2017

              Nobody knows more about being upset by the Nelly affair than me. I prayed for her yesterday.

            • Holy Heck Gezza! You ‘prayed’!!! To which Diety?

            • Gezza

               /  May 15, 2017

              The lot. Any that were listening & had kind hearts.

      • Corky

         /  May 15, 2017

        These guys and Andy have a lot in common.

        Reply
        • Pete Kane

           /  May 15, 2017

          G’s Duck, Charles, is taking a keen interest Cork.

          Reply
          • Corky

             /  May 15, 2017

            Sorry, wouldn’t have a clue what you are on about. Enjoy the clip anyway.

            Reply
  7. Pete Kane

     /  May 15, 2017

    Only the one PZ.

    Reply
    • Reminds me of an old Irish joke Pete …

      Paddy says to Corky, “Corky, old son, if you can guess how many items I’ve got in this ‘ere sack, I’ll give you both of them” …

      Reply
  8. Pete Kane

     /  May 15, 2017

    On a ‘serious’ note, I really do hope Andrew is reflecting upon the Jackson ‘issue;. His judgement (lack of) in this regard has really being at the distressing level.

    Reply
    • Well … Yes … I suppose … Secondary to English reflecting upon the Ngaro ‘issue’ …

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  May 15, 2017

        I’m wondering if this will escalate to level of someone demanding an AG investigation of the Ngaro decisions Bill English says he’s going to review.

        Reply
  9. Lloyd Burr reports that when first asked to explain his comments Ngaro was “unapologetic” and it wasn’t until later that he issued his half arsed apology.

    Prime Minister Bill English and National’s campaign manager Steven Joyce were quick to activate damage control, downplaying the comments as “naive from a new minister”.

    But before they could both get their hands on him and before the storm of bad PR hit, Mr Ngaro was still unapologetic when Newshub asked him to explain.

    “It was actually about saying ‘look let’s be mindful about the working relationship we have’,” he told Newshub at the conference.

    “It’s the context of saying that on the one hand we’re working together, and on the other hand too, if people are criticising, we just need to be mindful of that type of relationship, yep,” said Mr Ngaro.

    NGOs being “mindful” of criticising the Government sounds strikingly similar to threatening them to watch what they say.

    And he didn’t stop there.

    “If we’re going to have a positive partnership of working together, then it’s around having that, it’s talking about wider context but also all the things we are doing and working collectively together,” said Mr Ngaro.

    “My comments was (sic) just to be mindful of the fact that if we are going to be able to have these partnerships, we’ve just got to be political, what you call sensitive, in that context, yep.”

    Since saying this, Mr Ngaro has issued a statement saying he “absolutely regrets” what he said in his speech, which he admits was “poorly worded”.

    It begs the question – why did he repeat the sentiment in an interview on camera after the speech if he regretted saying them?

    http://www.newshub.co.nz/home/politics/2017/05/lloyd-burr-alfred-ngaro-s-threat-to-willie-jackson-was-worse-than-just-a-brain-fart.html

    Reply
    • High Flying Duck

       /  May 15, 2017

      Yep – not sure how anyone can defend this. It is an unforgivable statement from a backbencher let alone a minister.
      I think he may be standing down for personal reasons some time in the next few days.

      Reply
      • Corky

         /  May 15, 2017

        I may be reading this wrong but I think this is, and will be, a non issue.

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  May 15, 2017

          He might wriggle out from under it, but I think he’s done a major blue Corks that will cause some damage to him & National. Gonna watch Question Time tomorrow to see if anyone puts the boot in..

          Katie Bradford hasn’t got a clue what the issue’s really about as usual so 1Ewes watchers might just have carried on eating their dinner & not noticed anything’s happened.

          Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s