Comey and the Senate Intelligence Committee

Ex-FBI head James Comey will appear in front of the Senate Intelligence Committee overnight New Zealand time.

Some background from the Wall Street Journal:

Comey Testimony: The Highlights

According to Mr. Comey’s prepared remarks:

  • Donald Trump told him in a private, one-on-one dinner at the White House on Jan. 27: “I Need Loyalty, I Expect Loyalty.”
  • Mr. Comey told Mr. Trump in January he was not personally under federal investigation, to which Mr. Trump responded by asking the FBI chief to “get out” that information.
  • In February, Mr. Trump asked him to ‘let this go,’ referring to any inquiry into former National Security Adviser Mike Flynn, who was fired after misleading Vice President Mike Pence over his contacts with the Russian ambassador.
  • Mr. Comey will testify he kept memos documenting his interactions with the president.

WSJ:  Ex-FBI Chief James Comey’s Senate Testimony: Live Coverage

UPDATE

RNZ:  Comey: Trump White House ‘lied’ about the FBI

Mr Comey told a Senate committee they were wrong to denigrate the agency and its leadership.

He was also “confused” by the “shifting explanations” for his sacking, which came as he led a probe into any links between the Trump campaign and Moscow.

Mr Comey said Mr Trump had repeatedly told him he was doing a “great” job.

He told the panel that the White House “chose to defame me, and more importantly the FBI” by claiming the agency was “poorly led”.

“Those were lies, plain and simple. And I’m so sorry that the FBI workforce had to hear them,” he continued.

“The FBI is honest. The FBI is strong. And the FBI is and always will be independent,” he said in his opening remarks.

Mr Comey said it was a matter of circumstances, the subject matter and the “person I was interacting with”.

“I was honestly concerned that he might lie about the nature of our meeting” he told the panel of Mr Trump.

“I knew there would come a day that I might need a record, not just to defend myself, but to defend the FBI,” he said.

But…

…there is no known evidence of collusion and President Donald Trump has dismissed the story as “fake news”.

His spokeswoman Sarah Sanders on Thursday hit back at Mr Comey, saying: “I can definitively say the president is not a liar.”

More from Comey:

During Thursday’s testimony, Mr Comey emphasised that Russia’s political meddling was “not a close call”, adding: “There should be no fuzz on this whatsoever.”

When asked by the Senate Intelligence Committee whether the president tried to stop the Russia investigation he was conducting, Mr Comey said: “Not to my understanding, no.”

During another meeting with Mr Trump, Mr Comey said the president appealed to him to “let go” an investigation into fired national security adviser Michael Flynn and his ties to the Kremlin.

When asked how his FBI colleagues reacted to the president telling Mr Comey that he hoped the investigation into Mr Flynn would be dropped, he said: “I think they were as shocked and troubled as I was.”

“They’re all experienced professionals and they had never experienced such a thing,” he said.

“The conversation turned to what we should do about it and that was a struggle for us.”

He said he it was not for him to say whether Mr Trump’s actions were an obstruction of justice.

He calls Trump’s bluff on tapes.

After US media reported the conversation, the president warned Mr Comey in a tweet, saying he “better hope there are no ‘tapes’ of our conversations”.

Mr Comey told the committee he hoped there were tapes, calling on Mr Trump to release them.

“The president surely knows whether he taped me, and if he did my feelings aren’t hurt. Release all the tapes, I’m good with it,” he said.

The White House has refused to say whether any such tapes exist.

After Mr Trump’s tweet about potential tapes, Mr Comey said he realised it was important to release his own account of the story.

Comey leaked information.

He revealed that he asked a “good friend of mine” who is a professor at Columbia Law School to share contents of the memo with a reporter.

Mr Comey added that he asked for the documents to be leaked in order to build pressure for a special counsel.

And as predicted Team Trump is busy countering Comey’s testimony.

Fox News:  Trump disputes key parts of Comey testimony, sources say

President Trump disputes key elements of former FBI Director James Comey’s Senate testimony, sources close to the president tell Fox News.

Minutes before Comey began testifying before the Senate Intelligence Committee, sources said Trump has reviewed his prepared remarks and disputes claims that he sought “loyalty” from Comey and pressed him to lay off former national security adviser Michael Flynn.

He “did not say it,” a source said, adding, the “language used was not remotely close.”

One of the key details of Comey’s testimony concerns a Jan. 27 dinner where Comey claims Trump told him, “I need loyalty, I expect loyalty.”

He also said Trump told him in a subsequent meeting that he hoped Comey could “let this go” with regard to any investigation of Flynn.

A White House source also confirmed that Trump’s legal team and senior aides are watching Comey’s testimony from the president’s personal dining room near the Oval Office.

Only the attorneys were expected to be watching.

Yeah, right.

Fox News headlines with:  COMEY UNLEASHED: Ex-FBI boss accuses Team Trump of ‘lies’, suggests Lynch covered for Clinton

Former FBI Director James Comey’s testimony before a Senate panel on Thursday could have President Trump’s legal team breathing a sigh of relief since he stopped short of alleging obstruction of justice – but his otherwise scathing comments guarantee the political controversy and Russia-related probes are far from over.

“This is nowhere near the end of our investigation,” Senate Intelligence Committee Chairman Richard Burr, R-N.C., said moments after the hearing’s conclusion.

Comey, in his high-profile appearance before the committee, accused the administration of defaming him and said comments made about his competency “were lies, plain and simple.”

Comey also told lawmakers he decided to document meetings he had with Trump because he was “honestly concerned that he might lie about the nature” of their discussions.

White House Deputy Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders pushed back on Comey’s comments, telling reporters at a press briefing, “I can definitively say the president is not a liar.”

Comey went further, saying he believes he was fired because of the Russia investigation — and that in a now-famous February meeting, Trump directed him to ease off an investigation into former national security adviser Michael Flynn.

At the same time, Comey told lawmakers that Trump did not ask him to end the Russia investigation as a whole — a key piece of testimony that Trump’s allies were sure to notice.

Asked again if Trump engaged in obstruction of justice, Comey said, “I don’t know. That’s Bob Mueller’s job to sort that out.”

So this is far from over.

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56 Comments

  1. MaureenW

     /  June 8, 2017

    How shocking!!
    I can’t see anything particularly worrying about this dialogue – not understanding what the big deal is.
    Still it should be an interesting joust if Trump is planning on live-tweeting during Comey’s testimony.

    “Wrong”. “I never said that” “Lovin’ my new FBI Director” …….

    I’ll be tuning in, it should be a hoot.

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  June 9, 2017

      From the questioning I’ve just woken up & seen so far, it is actually damning of the President & appears to be felonious behaviour by him. But partisans on on both sides will interpret the testimony according to their already existing biases. On this issue, I don’t have one.

      I believe Comey is telling the truth. If Trump denies these conversations, I believe he is lying.

      Republicans have done their best to discredit James Comey, according to Aljaz commentary on testimony I have missed, but I do believe AlJazeera commenters have an anti-Trump perspective, so I bear in mind they may focus on negative factors & ignore opposing interpretations.

      Apparently there is more to be said on Flynn, Jeff Sessions, and how much Mike Pence knew about the intelligence re the potentially compromising contacts Flynn has had with The Russians in Closed Session.
      05.06 am

      Reply
      • Gezza, your sophistry leaves me breathless. On the on hand you announce a fixed interpretation of the Comey testimony and on the other hand say anyone having a different view is biased but you do not have an existing bias! I am amazed that half of the readers gave you an uptick. Have you read the statement issued by the White House Counsel? You will see that Trump’s legal spokesman says explicitly that Trump never demanded loyalty from Comey and specifically did bot ever use the form of words used by Comey in his sworn testimony
        Comey also admitted arranging for the leaking of his memos allegedly written after each of the three occasions of his one on one meetings including one that was classified. He leaked the material which was published in the New York Times the day before he was fired, Comey then admitted his intention was political and designed to cause a special investigator to be appointed. He was clearly following Gezza rules as to bias and “not me, him” defence. Wait for it.

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  June 9, 2017

          No, I’m open to being proven wrong, but there is no proof I’m wrong. And there is the matter of Trump threatening that there were tapes, which is the kind of thing you would be the first to use to justify a belief that this indicates he has something to hide, if you were of the opinion I am. You are making similar judgements on several unproven connections & crimes in the Seth Rich Citizen’s Investigation matter, in my view.

          I didn’t know when I posted that what Trump’s lawyer’s representations would be. I think Trump is not telling the truth about what he said about letting Flynn go, in particular. You apparently think he is. So we differ. I have open mind on some of these other issues.

          But I speak further about this below. I think both *gentlemen* have fallen short of probity. Comey as well. He could not be trusted in the job after those leaks.

          Reply
          • We shall see Geeza. I do not consider “threatening” as a useful adjective in the context of Trump’s reference to possible tapes, but it could be indicating Trump’s assertion that Comey’s description of the meeting did not agree with Trump’s recall. Comey’s big mistake was, if he needed to record what he understood to be the essence of the meeting, then he should have shared the text with Trump in an email seeking confirmation of his understanding of the meeting. He didn’t so it remains a personal recollection of a meeting reduced to writing. The other thing is I understand Comey admitted circulating the memos to others immediately afterwards. Why? What was his motive? No reverberations from the echo chamber?
            As to the Seth Rich case. We shall see whose assessment is closest . At least it is out there and will not now go away.

            Reply
            • Gezza

               /  June 9, 2017

              He has explained his reason – altho we could also call it motive perhaps – for circulating his memo to his small team. Basically, “WTF, guys? Jesus Christ (or presumably words to that effect). This is the President ! What do I do about this?” “Carry on with the investigation, boss. We’ll figure that out later if we have to.”

            • Got a link on that Geeza? Works both ways.

            • Gezza

               /  June 9, 2017

              Kimberley Halcutt, Washington Editor, Aljazeera tv live.

    • This is just a step along the way.

      Asked again if Trump engaged in obstruction of justice, Comey said, “I don’t know. That’s Bob Mueller’s job to sort that out.”

      Comey has deliberately left the key question open and deferred to the FBI special counsel investigation.

      Reply
      • David

         /  June 9, 2017

        If Mueller was even contemplating obstruction of justice Comey would not be testifying openly just in case it compromised the case.
        Comey left the question open because he is a glory seeking show pony who wants a bit of utu for being humiliatingly fired, in a pretty awful way to be fair.

        Reply
  2. Reply
  3. Only in the US, or only with Trump perhaps – lawyers arguing their client’s case via the media. It can only be an attempt to win in the court of public opinion, it shouldn’t help their case in the investigations, if anything it will work against them.

    Reply
  4. MaureenW

     /  June 9, 2017

    Have a look at Comey’s testimony to Marc Rubio- it’s rather damning of Comey Rubio says that the only thing not leaked to the media, was that Trump wasn’t under investigation
    http://m.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11863826

    Reply
    • PDB

       /  June 9, 2017

      That’s what stands out from some pretty standard testimony that has no ‘smoking gun’. All the leaks have been all in the Democrats favour, some of which were later proven wrong or shown to be over-exaggerated.

      After being sacked Comey then admits today he ‘leaked’ his private meeting notes to a friend to give to the media because he had the MSM parked outside his house?? With that little backbone I wouldn’t want the guy anywhere near the FBI.

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  June 9, 2017

        Me neither. Both guilty of gross misconduct in their positions from what I’ve seen so far. Still, that’s America these days.

        Reply
      • Joe Bloggs

         /  June 9, 2017

        as if trump has a reasonable expectation that he can fire someone and lie about the reasons and expect that person’s confidence in the exercise…

        Talking about Comey and his choices won’t change the fundamental problem, which is about the trump presidency, not about the former FBI director.

        One way or another, we have to face the fact that Americans have a president about whom the FBI director, after meeting him once, began writing memos to file, because he did not trust him to tell the truth about their interactions or to respect the functioning of law enforcement—and that this seems, given the “nature of the person,” an entirely prudent course of conduct.

        Reply
        • Joe, I understand the point you wish to make. However, when Comey went into the first meeting he was already on the defensive. This is usually impossible to hide from an astute “people person” like Trump. Body language, choice of words, the normal human warmth or its absence usually give that “first impression”. It takes an extraordinary person to be able to ignore the gut feeling first impressions make particularly in a one on one dinner with the President. A huge honour for anyone? Yet Comey validated the impression of suspicion and erecting defensive “umbrella’s” by putting his recall into writing. His fatal flaw though was that he did not copy the memo to the President thereby giving it authenticity. Why not?

          Reply
  5. artcroft

     /  June 9, 2017

    Trump has a big to do list today: Release the tapes, get Mexico to pay for the wall, repeal and replace Obama Care, jet back to Mar a Lago for a weekend of golf and tweeting. Wonder which ones he’ll get done?

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  June 9, 2017

      I think Comey is telling the truth and it damns him, Arty.

      I think Trump is not telling the truth because it damns him, & because he doesn’t consider lying to be wrong, it’s just strategy. Cheating is perfectly ok. Beating the opposition is all that counts.

      It will be interesting to see what comes out of the Closed Session.

      Reply
      • MaureenW

         /  June 9, 2017

        I didn’t find the conversations Trump had with Comey shocking or smelly. I thought he made reasonable requests.
        Of course Comey wouldn’t lie – that’s why he found “no intent” in the Clinton email fiasco. Comey stated that Clinton wasn’t sophisticated enough to know she was risking national security.
        That’s the former Secretary of State, former senator and congresswoman, lawyer and former first lady of the White House.

        http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2016/jul/7/fbis-comey-hillary-clinton-not-sophisticated-enoug/

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  June 9, 2017

          Yes, Clinton’s investigation is interesting too. The sessions on her are over now aren’t they? For now anyway.

          Reply
        • Gezza

           /  June 9, 2017

          Trump categorically denied slyly pressuring Comey to drop the investigation into Flynn, which investigation should continue, Maureen. In that respect, he did wrong, and my personal view is that he is lying about that, and it is why the focus of his lawyer’s comments is so heavily weighted on the distraction that he is not himself under investigation. It’s my opinion at this stage. He really is happy to bully, threaten, and lie like a flatfish to get what he wants, is my assessment of his character.

          But that doesn’t mean I don’t think his internal policy programme, so far as we can see it to date, can’t be successful overall. American citizens, and others, when I think about it, including here, are quite capable of still liking a politician caught out in a lie, depending who it is, how important it is, and whether they think that, overall, they are doing a good job.

          Reply
          • MaureenW

             /  June 9, 2017

            He sad he hoped Comey could see it way to dropping it. That is not an order. I believe the President does have the constitutional power to make that order, he didn’t do that.

            Reply
            • Gezza

               /  June 9, 2017

              Mr Trump expects to get his way, Maureen. There would be no doubt about what was meant. None. Whether he had the constitutional power to stop the investigation will no doubt be determined. All he needs to do now is produce the tapes to save his lawyer having to make excuses, & exonerate himself.

          • High Flying Duck

             /  June 9, 2017

            Given Trump had the constitutional authority to order Comey to stop investigating, and could also simply pardon Flynn if he so chose, why would he “slyly” do anything?
            As you said – Trump likes to get his way but he has let things carry on and no investigation was paused, halted or ceased in any way.

            Reply
            • Gezza

               /  June 9, 2017

              I didn’t know that a Presudential Pardon for Flynn could be exercised anytime HFD, & there would risks in that he may not been prepared to run. Because he does take risks, or he wouldn’t be there.

              I didn’t know for certain that he had the Constiutional Authority to order Comey to stop investigating, I thought there would be Constitutional constraints on the power of the Executive in the case of a criminal investigation, which is what this potentially is. (I don’t think it will find criminal activity. )

            • High Flying Duck

               /  June 9, 2017

              Read the Washington Examiner article Maureen linked to directly below. It explains it well – he has the authority and other presidents have used it.

            • Gezza

               /  June 9, 2017

              I can’t read, HFD. I always have to wait for the video. (Don’t tell anyone.)

          • Gezza

             /  June 9, 2017

            @ HFD. Quickly learned the alphabet & had a read. (Thanks Maureen too for the link.)

            The page keeps crashing on FiP Chrome. Might try an iPad reboot & see if it’m stay up. But I managed to read enough to see that Prez Bush Senior pardoned Weinberger & others which put an end to a Special Prosecutor’s investigation into the Iran Contra affair which it was claimed might have been leading to investigation of whether Bush himself was involved or knew about it, & that there was nothing illegal about his doing so.

            I find that utterly fascinating. I still think Trump tried to get Comey to let up on Flynn, that he clearly meant stop investigating him, and that he is denying he did so – & I don’t believe him: he is known proven liar. The fact he didn’t grant a pardon & shut it down may have been due to concern about what the impact would be. In the current media & political climate it would cause a forest fire in high winds with insufficient trustable numbers of trained firefighters available to put it out.

            I had assumed the FBI was similar to our police & that political interference by the PM here would be unlawful. The way the Judicial, Legislative & Executive powers are exercised in the US, with The Prez having not very well-defined Executive Powers, & Congress & Senate Comittees having awesome independent powers of subpoena, & enquiry, & Special Prosecutors appointed by Justice Dept having similar powers, & the FBI having its own powers & statutory role to investigate whether criminal behaviour has taken place seems a right buggers muddle.

            Precedents seem to be irrelevant to some extent at present. The Mueller Investigation is proceeding, & I expect at least one House Committee will continue with its enquiries off & on until Mueller reports the results. What powers the Committees have to do anything to anyone I don’t know.

            I still think both men have sullied themselves, but I expect that only one is likely to come out of the rotten fruit-covered fight cage on top, eventually – Trump.

            The drama shows no sign of ending yet. Still looking forward to the results of the Closed Session testimony & evidence. Also now waiting to see whether Comey will be prosecuted – as is being threatened by someone, I thought I heard on the telly. Prosecuting an FBI chief & lawyer will be very interesting to watch.

            Reply
  6. MaureenW

     /  June 9, 2017

    This is the first time I have officially heard that Trump is not under investigation for Russian interference into the US elections after 12 months of endless, anonymously sourced noise. I wonder what will replace it now?
    I heard an interview this morning with Alan Dershowitz who states categorically that Trump did not obstruct justice .. period.

    The Trump/Russia thing is a partisan witch-hunt perpetuated by MSM and all the tonight shows, and has Comey coming out of this (in my opinion) looking like a drip. He deserved to be fired – good riddance to him.

    http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/alan-dershowitz-history-precedent-and-james-comeys-opening-statement-show-that-trump-did-not-obstruct-justice/article/2625318

    Reply
    • Joe Bloggs

       /  June 9, 2017

      The Republicans were worried sick about Clinton’s private server possibly getting hacked.
      Russia actually hacking the US election? Not so much…

      Think about it: The president’s intelligence chiefs brought him evidence about a foreign power essentially attacking the United States, but trump’s main concern was pushing back on a story that he once paid Russian prostitutes to pee on one another.

      Nothing about the election itself or a vow to protect the public from future attacks. All he was interested in was one gross story and, for some unexplained reason, the future of Michael Flynn.

      Reply
      • MaureenW

         /  June 9, 2017

        Speaking of Clintons server, the obstruction of justice occurred with that investigation, not Trump.

        Reply
  7. Maureen, I have spent many hours looking at the situation and agree with your statement about the MSM’s partisan witch-hunt. But there is more, they are following closely a strategy to remove Trump from the Presidency. It has certain elements of psychological operations and psychological warfare techniques to sell a message of a President unfit for office.
    You have to ask what Comey’s intention was in publishing his opening statement before attending the meeting with the Intelligence Committee. I can find no precedent for such an action as the words are clearly defamatory of President Trump, and published outside of the protection of Congress. I suspect that Comey was deliberately trying to control the framework of the narrative, that is selective, and reveals to me a person who has let his personal politics override his duty of candour. His suspicious approach in the meetings must surely have shown up in his body language and the hostility lurking under the surface must have been identified by Trump – and may have initiated the questions relating to whether or not he wanted to continue in the job as head of the FBI. We have only seen the words of a disaffected former employee and his interpretation of what was said and the atmospherics of the meetings. To be fair, I would want to hear the other side (Trumps) before coming to any final conclusions.

    Reply
    • Joe Bloggs

       /  June 9, 2017

      BJ Oh, for heaven’s sake… You trust trump? You want to hear his side? You’ve been hearing it for the past 3 months and all that’s been evidenced is that he’s a pathological liar. He can’t help himself.

      Reply
      • Lets give a bad dog a name eh Joe? Do not fall into the trap of ever considering possible alternative views. Back to sleep old boy!

        Reply
    • MaureenW

       /  June 9, 2017

      I’m following it closely too BJ and the most perplexing question I have is why is there this highly coordinated effort to discredit and remove Trump as President? What agenda could be so important to whoever is behind this that a 4 year Trump presidency could disrupt?

      Reply
      • In shorthand, Maureen, it is the Globalist movement to dismantle the Nation State concept of civilisation as part of a bid by “the few” to exercise World Government. The disruption to the unity of the USA is a necessary precursor to this occurring. Big money is after total control of a global economy based on maximum profitability from low cost and value of the resources of production. All resources will be under the control of the World Government. It is claimed in some quarters that in conjunction with this change the total population of the Globe would be reduced by 10%.
        I am aware of that sort of fringe view and have decided to be aware but not worried because freedom is too precious to humanity for the globalists to ever succeed.

        Reply
        • MaureenW

           /  June 9, 2017

          Thanks BJ, I aware of all of this also, but am gaining the impression there is something even more pressing than this.
          The march towards Globalisation can and probably will continue whether or not Trump is in power. I don’t know that Trump is “anti-globalisation” only that he stood on a platform of making America great again and bringing back jobs.

          Reply
          • Well I suggest you have a look at what Steve Bannon, Trump’s strategic adviser in the White House has to say:

            Then Google what Obama said during his trip to Europe while Trump was there, and listen to his description of the “New World Order”.
            It shows up progressive socialist liberal left strategy for Global order.
            Trump’s vision for the unitary nation state is firmly rooted in the Constitution of the USA and individual democratic freedoms and independence. It is only about 140 years since the bloody civil war was fought to defend that constitution. I can remember the death of the last participant in 1959 when I joined the NZ Army.

            Reply
            • MaureenW

               /  June 9, 2017

              Thanks BJ I’ll take a look at this later.

            • Anonymous Coward

               /  June 9, 2017

              He seems to just be talking about himself.

            • MaureenW

               /  June 9, 2017

              I’m somewhat cautious of Infowars. Listen, divide by 2 and add 3.
              I have often wondered whether Alex Jones is part of a controlled opposition, there for gauging the strength and reaction to an opposition to the main game plan. Wierd, but that thought is a recurring one.
              I first became aware of globalism around 2005 or 2006, seeing speeches given by Bush Senior and Kissinger (at different times) and have seen evidence of the apparent strategies to bring this about. I don’t see the genie going back into the bottle anytime soon.

            • Gezza

               /  June 9, 2017

              Our thinking is similar on Infowars & globalism, Maureen. I watch, think, check things out sometimes. Rinse & repeat.

  8. Reflecting on Comey’s claim that he was defamed by Trump for saying that morale in the FBI was in tatters and the leadership was inept (or words to that effect). What is the lie? Is it not possible for a superior to make an overall assessment of the state of subordinate organisation, and state it? To label that as defaming and a lie is a challenge to the overall leader. The best Comey could have said was he repudiated the assessment and give his conflicting assessment for consideration. But no, he chose to say in sworn testimony that the President of the USA had lied in a Congressional committee hearing.

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  June 9, 2017

      If the President HAS lied, why should Comey not tell the truth? Your argument on that makes no sense. And if your argument is that an overall leader must always simply always be obeyed, that too has been taken to murderous extremes, & while I would agree with it in a general sense, I would have reservations about it where the instruction was morally or legally wrong.

      Reply
      • High Flying Duck

         /  June 9, 2017

        I think the point is Comey has painted an opinion as being a lie and defamatory. Plays well to certain media but it was a completely meaningless statement. It also points to Comey’s leanings. His father came out previously and said Comey did not want to work with Trump because he despised him.
        I think we can fairly surmise his testimony is very tainted.

        Reply
        • High Flying Duck, than you, you expressed concisely exactly my point. An opinion can never be a lie, it is what it is. The opinion can be wrong, but thats why opinion has to stand in line behind fact in the alphabet of truth.

          Reply
          • Gezza

             /  June 9, 2017

            Only the tapes can tell us the truth. Everything else about what took place in those discussions is speculation, coloured by our perceptions of the two men involved, & most probably whether we like them or not. I have lost all respect for Comey, but I believe Trump tried to get him to ‘go easy on Flynn’. Without undoctored recordings, we cannot know the true content & context of their discussions. I await the results of the Closed Session.

            Reply
    • PDB

       /  June 9, 2017

      I agree to a point bj – Comey should have simply said he disagreed with Trumps assessment of how effective the FBI and his leadership was. Saying the president ‘lied’ seems more of a soundbite for the left-wing MSM to jump on.

      As with most things the truth likely falls somewhere in-between – the FBI/Comey wasn’t the total basket case Trump makes out but on the other hand mass leaking of information would suggest an FBI somewhat out of control & lacking strong leadership.

      Reply
      • PDB, good points made. Thank you (I found the missing “k’ from HFD’s comment above). It is a lesson for all who dismiss an employee for cause, choose words carefully lest you be required to eat them.

        Reply
        • PDB

           /  June 9, 2017

          Comey comes out of this looking weak and far from the strong persona he tried to portray whilst FBI head.

          *Weak on Clinton by complying with this request: “Former FBI Director James Comey says that former Attorney General Loretta Lynch urged him to refer to the investigation into Hillary Clinton’s emails a “matter” instead of an “investigation.” – pbs
          *Weak on Trump by feeling ‘intimidated’ by him and not having the guts to tell Trump that meeting with him one-on-one was undesirable and shutting down the meeting ASAP.
          *Weak if he thought Trump was telling him to shut down the investigation and not taking action at the time by reporting the incident to the correct authorities as he should have.
          *Weak on leakers and Clinton’s email fiasco – made worse when Comey himself leaks his own memos to the media via a friend with those notes being govt property that shouldn’t have left the office in the first instance (and may lead to Comey facing legal action). Especially fascinating was he admitted he did this in the hope a special prosecutor would be appointed.
          *Weak in not coping with the MSM pressure and as a result leaking his memos to them through a mate rather than give them to the media himself.

          As for Trump we already knew he was a bumbling, fumbling fool stumbling around the White house – Comey’s testimony just confirms that fact.

          Reply
  9. Conspiratoor

     /  June 9, 2017

    Comey blinks first. He admits he leaked his classified emails. A deep throat unmasked.

    Game, set and match to the pres.

    Reply

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