UK election aftermath

The UK election is over, resulting in a hung Parliament, about the worst thing that could have happened with Brexit to deal with shortly.

But despite her quest for more power and dumping a snap election on Labour backfiring Theresa May has not mucked around.

The biggest losers, apart from May’s credibility, were UKIP, who lost 108% of the vote. They dropped to just 1.8% and lost their only seat.

Labour increased their share of the vote by 5.5% to 42.4%, while the Conservatives increased their’s by less, 5.5%, but still got the most at 42.4%.

BBC:  May to form ‘government of certainty’ with DUP backing

Theresa May has said she will put together a government with the support of the Democratic Unionists to guide the UK through crucial Brexit talks.

Speaking after visiting Buckingham Palace, she said only her party had the “legitimacy” to govern, despite falling eight seats short of a majority.

In a short statement outside Downing Street after an audience with the Queen, Mrs May said she would join with her DUP “friends” to “get to work” on Brexit.

Referring to the “strong relationship” she had with the DUP but giving little detail of how their arrangement might work, she said she intended to form a government which could “provide certainty and lead Britain forward at this critical time for our country”.

“Our two parties have enjoyed a strong relationship over many years,” she said.

“And this gives me the confidence to believe that we will be able to work together in the interests of the whole United Kingdom.”

It is thought Mrs May will seek some kind of informal arrangement with the DUP that could see it “lend” its support to the Tories on a vote-by-vote basis, known as “confidence and supply”.

Later, she said she “obviously wanted a different result” and was “sorry” for colleagues who lost their seats.

“I’m sorry for all those candidates… who weren’t successful, and also particularly sorry for MPs and ministers who’d contributed so much to our country, and who lost their seats and didn’t deserve to lose their seats.

“As I reflect on the results, I will reflect on what I need to do in the future to take the party forward.”

So for now at least all the speculation and demands that she step down as Conservative leader and Prime Minister were meaningless.

But Labour said they were the “real winners”.

They gained a lot of votes (9.5% up to 40.0%) and some seats (up 29 to 261) but still lost the election. They still have Jeremy Corbyn as leader, hailed as an election hero and it will be difficult to budge him now, but still out of government possibly for the next five years.

BBC: Jeremy Corbyn says May ‘underestimated’ voters

Jeremy Corbyn has said Theresa May “underestimated” voters and the Labour Party after the Tories failed to win an overall majority in the election.

He said people had voted “for hope” after his party secured 261 seats in Parliament.

The Labour leader called on Mrs May to resign after the Conservatives were left eight seats short of a majority.

“Your vote for us was a vote for change, a vote for our country and a vote for hope,” he said.

“But she underestimated the Labour Party, and more importantly, she underestimated you.”

He went on to say Theresa May called the general election “in her party’s interests, not in the interests of the country” and thought she could “take your vote for granted”.

To an extent Corbyn is correct, May made a silly decision to call a snap election and campaigned terribly, but Corbyn and Labour are still in opposition for now at least.

Not enough of “the people” chose to ditch May and the Conservatives.

The Lib Dems said Mrs May should be “ashamed” of carrying on.

BBC:  Lib Dem leader Tim Farron says May should go

Theresa May must resign and Brexit negotiations should be put on hold, the Liberal Democrat leader Tim Farron has said.

He said talks about leaving the EU should be delayed until the new government sets out its plans to the public.

And he insisted there would be no deal to prop up a Tory government.

“Like David Cameron before her, our Conservative prime minister rolled the dice with the future of our country out of sheer arrogance and vanity,” he said.

“It is simply inconceivable that the prime minister can begin the Brexit negotiations in just two weeks’ time.

“She should consider her future – and then, for once, she should consider the future of our country.”

But it was a mixed election for the Liberal Democrats. They gained 4 seats (now 12) but lost some MPs and votes, dropping half a percent to 7.4%.

Mr Farron’s comments came after a night which saw the former Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg lose his seat to the Labour Party in Sheffield Hallam, becoming the first major figure to fall in the 2017 election.

But former ministers Vince Cable and Jo Swinson both won back their seats after losing them in 2015.

And Mr Farron kept his seat of Westmorland and Lonsdale, although his majority fell from 8,949 to just 777.

The big question now: Who are the Democratic Union Party?

They won 10 seats, up 2, and 292,316 votes, 0.9% of the total.

Theresa May has said she will form a government with the support of the DUP, though it is not clear what kind of arrangement this will be.

Despite party leader Arlene Foster warning it would be difficult for the prime minister to stay in No 10, discussions are certainly going on behind the scenes.

The party has moved on to the political centre stage but most people will be in the dark about what it stands for.

The DUP website crashed on Friday morning after a surge of interest, and DUP was also one of the most searched terms on Google.

Basically, they are pro-union (not Europe but UK), pro-Brexit and socially conservative.

The party, which returned 10 MPs to Westminster, has garnered a bit of a reputation for its strong and controversial views.

It opposes same-sex marriage and is anti-abortion – abortion remains illegal in Northern Ireland, except in specific medical cases.

Mervyn Storey, the party’s former education spokesman, once called for creationism – the belief that human life did not evolve over millions of years but was created by God – to be taught alongside evolution in science classes.

In December, the DUP’s Trevor Clarke was criticised by Sir Elton John after the politician admitted he did not know heterosexual people could contract HIV until a charity explained the facts to him.

Fairly conservative then, on social issues at least.

Then there’s the party’s historical links to loyalist paramilitaries.

During this general election campaign, the DUP’s Emma Little-Pengelly received the endorsement of the three biggest loyalist paramilitary organisations.

Although the DUP said it did not accept their support, in her acceptance speech, Mrs Little-Pengelly thanked those who came out to vote for her, singling out several loyalist working class areas in Belfast.

The DUP was a wholehearted supporter of Brexit and got heavily involved in the Leave campaign.

After Brexit, the border between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland becomes an EU frontier and the DUP is not in favour of a so-called hard border. This means no checkpoints or intrusive enforcement.

So no hard border but in the round, the party’s vision of Brexit is a fairly hard one – it was the most Eurosceptic party in the UK before the ascent of UKIP.

The party also wants to leave the EU customs union – their manifesto says there should be “progress on new free trade deals with the rest of the world” – and end the jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice, ensuring that in future British law is supreme.

One red line is the idea of Northern Ireland being granted some sort of “special status” when Brexit comes to pass – the DUP will not stand for any arrangement that physically sets the region apart from anywhere else in the UK.

Its 2017 manifesto set out its position on Brexit and other issues, including:

  • Further increases to the personal tax allowance – similar to Conservative Party policy
  • Continued rises in the national living wage – similar
  • Renew Trident – similar
  • Revisit terrorism laws – similar
  • Abolish air passenger duty – different from the Conservatives
  • Cut VAT for tourism businesses – different
  • Call for “triple lock” on pensions – different

Its key slogan during the campaign turned out to be rather prescient: “A vote for the DUP team is a vote to send ‘Team Northern Ireland’ to Westminster. It is a team that has real influence”.

It looks like DUP may have real influence now.

Leave a comment

122 Comments

  1. Missy

     /  June 10, 2017

    While everyone is wringing their hands Theresa May has struck a deal (darn quick) with DUP to form a Government. She has gone to Buckingham Palace and outlined her intentions to the Queen.

    I will admit I don’t know much about the DUP, but going on some comments they seem a bit further to the right than the Conservatives.

    One sticky point may be related to the Brexit deal, the DUP do not want a hard border with the Republic (naturally) which many interpret as meaning remaining in the Single Market and Customs Union – both of which Theresa May has said the UK will pull out of. However, Theresa May has also indicated that whilst she will put a hard border with the Continent she does not want one between NI and the Republic in terms of immigration, and she wants to look at solutions for Northern Ireland with relation to trading matters with the Republic, so this may not mean the compromise some think it will.

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/06/09/general-election-results-theresa-may-talks-dup-coalition/

    Tim Farron, and other Remain supporting MPs, have shown their complete lack of understanding of the electorate again. They said that this will mean a ‘soft’ Brexit, and that the Brexit plans are in disarray, however, despite Theresa May trying to make the election about Brexit, the vast majority of people voted on issues other than Brexit. This means that the pro Remain MPs still are out of touch with what people are voting on.

    I am off out with some things to do, but hopefully won’t be too late and can provide some more updates – if there are any – then.

    Reply
    • patupaiarehe

       /  June 10, 2017

      Missy, I am a tad naive about how the ‘system’ works in Britain. When you have time, please explain how a majority equals a loss

      Reply
      • Missy

         /  June 10, 2017

        She doesn’t have a majority. The UK have FPP, they have 650 seats in the House of Commons, so to get an outright majority the Conservatives would have needed 331 seats. It does get a little complicated when Sinn Fein are taken into account. Sinn Fein refuse to take up their seats in Westminster, thus the Parliament reduces by the number of seats Sinn Fein have, thereby reducing the majority, and then removing the 4 speakers lowers the working majority by more.

        The results so far are (2 seats to declare):
        Conservatives 318
        Labour 261
        SNP 35
        Lib Dem 12
        DUP 10
        Sinn Fein 7
        Plaid Cymru 4
        Greens 1

        So, here is where it gets complicated. As Sinn Fein have 7 seats, the effective majority is 324, then when the 4 speakers are taken into account the working majority is 320, TM falls short by 2 votes.

        This is considered a loss for TM as she lost the slim majority the Conservatives had, overall the Conservatives lost 12 seats, Labour gained 31. Corbyn is being celebrated as a winner.

        Hope that explains it Patu. 🙂

        Reply
        • David

           /  June 10, 2017

          With the DUP, May has a working majority.

          Corbyn lost the election.

          Reply
          • Gezza

             /  June 10, 2017

            True, but the way things had been going for him, to suddenly pick up more seats makes him feel like he won it. Be interesting to see if he keeps, loses, or increases support from here.

            Reply
          • Missy

             /  June 10, 2017

            Corbyn would have only been able to cobble together a minority anyway as only the SNP would go into a coalition with him. The Liberal Democrats stated quite clearly through the campaign, and again on Thursday night and yesterday that they would not do any deals. They are still suffering after 2010, so appear to be a little gun shy on deals.

            A Conservative councillor suggested May just hands it over to Corbyn let him do Brexit with the view that he will be punished for it very badly. Not sure she was entirely serious, but I think that maybe she also thought h wouldn’t last 6 months.

            Reply
    • Gezza

       /  June 10, 2017

      “Theresa May has also indicated that whilst she will put a hard border with the Continent she does not want one between NI and the Republic in terms of immigration, and she wants to look at solutions for Northern Ireland with relation to trading matters with the Republic, so this may not mean the compromise some think it will.”

      Personally, I’m very pleased to hear that. There was quite a bit of commentary going on by commenters & reporters on Aljazeera when I went to bed. A very interesting & I thought insightful analysis of what happened to the SNP, done by the absolutely gorgeous Julie MacDonald, standin in the dun, with a castle behind her, as a piper started playing in the background.

      I wish I could remember more, but I was tired & didn’t really stick. Elements of it that I do recall were that she thought people were tired of the SNP, (& I assume Nicola), didn’t want another referendum, & were signalling that they were not happy with SNP’s social policies & expectec some changes. Can’t remember what changes she suggested folk wanted, just that they hadn’t done enough.

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  June 10, 2017

        * standin in the dun = standing in the sun!
        Gawd. Embarrassment. 😰 Thought I’d proof-read that. FiP. The screen’s too small.

        Reply
      • Missy

         /  June 10, 2017

        To be honest G the only reason that the UK have had a hard border with the Republic in Ireland was because of the IRA, no-one in the UK wants a return to that.

        Of course they need to look at how they will manage the issue of people illegally using Ireland to get from the EU to the UK, and this will come under more scrutiny as it came out that one of the terrorists from last Saturday’s attack had managed to get into the UK via using the EU and living in Ireland for a couple of years before coming here.

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  June 10, 2017

          Yes, I understand, and I want to be sensitive to that. My ancestors are from Cook, Kerry & Clare. We are a powerful tribe. We did not lose our land to the British, but collaborationists are reviled to this day, & our name is still Good in Eire.

          Things could be difficult with the DUP’s links to loyalist parmilitaries. This needs to end. To me it has always been Northern Eire, an incomplete liberation of my ancestral homeland. But too many Brits have now been born there. It is their land too, & they are the majority in thos vounties. Northern Ireland is now British. All I want is for both peoples to treat each fairly, and share & love their land. Does this make sense to you?

          Reply
          • Gezza

             /  June 10, 2017

            bugger. Too careless again.

            * thos vounties = those counties.

            Reply
          • Missy

             /  June 10, 2017

            There are issues with the DUP propping up the Conservatives, I think there endorsement from Unionist para military groups is one, but not the major issue. Note that today the claims have been that any ‘links’ are nothing more than endorsements, apparently the DUP officially do not accept or acknowledge endorsements from Unionist paramilitary groups, I don’t know anything about them so will have to learn.

            I did hear today also, that whilst Sinn Fein was the political arm of the IRA the DUP is not, they are a political party first and foremost and have not had the same connections to paramilitary groups Sinn Fein has had. In saying that I am not knowledgeable enough yet (and to be honest I don’t think many in England are) to say with conviction what the situation is.

            Some in NI are concerned at how the DUP propping up the Conservatives will affect the Assembly. At the moment the Assembly is suspended because of issues with Sinn Fein and the DUP, and it is the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland that has to mediate, however, this could be put in jeopardy if Sinn Fein object to the appointment and the closeness between DUP and the Conservatives. Some people (not experts – just talkback callers) have even suggested it could put the peace process at risk.

            Reply
          • Missy

             /  June 10, 2017

            Reply
            • Missy

               /  June 10, 2017

              Free travel with RoI is not related to EU, but pre-dates it by quite some time. That won’t change I don’t believe.

              Noting that Irish citizens are the only EU citizens allowed to vote in a General Election in the UK. So whatever control the EU want over Ireland / UK relations it doesn’t matter.

              A huge problem with the EU is showing in relations with Ireland & UK, they think it is all about them & EU law, and think they are the reason for it, but don’t understand the relationships that the UK have with former members of its empire. One of the reasons many EU citizens have a hard time dealing with the fact Irish (& Commonwealth) citizens can vote here but they can’t.

  2. Gezza

     /  June 10, 2017

    Missy, you are a wonder. I just don’t know how you manage to get through such a hard day where the stress must have dreadful for you, your dreams almost completely shattered, & still look just so amazing. 😍

    😉 You posted this yesterday: “I wonder how much Crosby Textor are to blame as well, some of the way they ran this campaign is very similar to what I have seen in NZ, and it makes me think they only have one plan and they don’t have the ability to change tactics and re-focus the campaign.”

    If you were running the campaign, what would you have changed?

    Reply
    • Missy

       /  June 10, 2017

      awww…. Cheers G.

      I am not sure, I think for starters I wouldn’t have made it about Theresa May, that doesn’t play well here, and didn’t, Crosby Textor played it the way they have done in NZ with John Key being the focus of the National Party. It worked in NZ because Key is that kind of guy people know or want to know, the guy you will have a beer at the pub with or go and have a barbecue with (who can forget the pic of him and Prince William at the barbecue with a beer?), but Theresa May isn’t that kind of person and it didn’t work with her. May is reserved, so she came across as quite cold and unemotional, hardly likeable at all (though I still like her, I just think this was not a great campaign).

      I would have put more of the Cabinet front and centre, though to be honest Hammond was a liability – he is a bit of a drip though. But apart from Amber Rudd in the last couple of weeks, and Boris (or BJ or BoJo) in the last few days, very few of the cabinet were seen campaigning.

      I would have leveraged social media a bit more in a positive manner – though to be fair that could be hard for the Conservatives, it isn’t really a natural fit for them, but a couple of their candidates (and now MPs) used social media very well.

      I would have front footed the Security points a bit better, and would have not spent so much time on the negatives of Labour. It was a lesson that should have been learnt from the referendum last year that going negative doesn’t work.

      To be honest I would have called the election earlier – gone to the polls in May, and I would have ensured the manifesto was locked down and costed before going to the election. I would potentially have been a bit vaguer on the social policy in the manifesto (i.e.: will increase the amount at which point people start paying), and then when questioned said that they would produce a green paper and consult with the care providers. Also, I would never have touched the fuel allowance, especially as it is a devolved issue in Scotland, there was always the risk (as happened) that Scotland would go different to the rest of the UK on it. I would also have focussed more on the economy.

      I would have changed the way the policies were communicated. There were a couple which are good policies, but due to the way they were presented and picked up by the opposition and media they were easily distorted, and there was very little shutting down of the distortion and communication on the way they were being presented.

      I would have left the fox hunting thing alone. Regardless of the evidence that it isn’t cruel, (according to something I read from a vet the foxes are apparently killed instantly by the dogs, and when the dogs ‘rip them apart’ they are already dead – shooting them is apparently crueler as they usually die a slow death after being shot), or the devastation to farmers and their livelihoods, fox hunting is still a very emotional issue, and many oppose it (mostly those in the city). Saying that she would give a free vote on fox hunting – and worse answering a question honestly saying that she does not disapprove of fox hunting – was not a wise move. Though to be fair I would not be surprised if this was to appease some back benchers and keep them on side.

      In saying that, they are the piffle, listening to grassroots campaigners on the radio today – and on twitter, the biggest thing I would have changed if I was running the campaign would be to have listened to what those on the ground were saying. From all accounts those at the HQ running the campaign were not listening to what the people on the ground and campaigning were saying. From the parachuting in of some candidates to ideas on the manifesto to what the voters think of Theresa May.

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  June 10, 2017

        Amazing. Wish I could do that with the insight & speed you & a few others here can.
        Thanks for that. Seems to me like they might’ve actually been listening, just didn’t know what to do, or who should do it.

        Reply
        • Missy

           /  June 10, 2017

          haha… I have had a day of listening to the analysis and to form my opinion, so got a bit of a jump there I think. 🙂

          I am not sure, if they were listening they didn’t show it, and the campaigners on the ground certainly don’t think so.

          Reply
          • Gezza

             /  June 10, 2017

            (Hope you’re not saying I’m wrong: That doesn’t always go down well in this whare 😉 )

            Reply
            • Missy

               /  June 10, 2017

              Never G…. Just saying that I have had time to think, which is why I was quick, and I should have added that you would have been as quick if you had spent the day listening to the radio about it as well. 🙂

            • Missy

               /  June 10, 2017

              And now I am turning in, I didn’t get much sleep last night, and it has been a busy day today.

              Oh, and I may not be about tomorrow, am off to Hastings to see where the first battle of Britains last foreign invasion took place. 🙂

            • Gezza

               /  June 10, 2017

              I’d wish you goodnight, but then *someone* might misunderstand our “relationship” … 🙂

            • Gezza

               /  June 10, 2017

              Aww … downticks. ☹️
              Here, Petal 🌺

      • Blazer

         /  June 10, 2017

        so when can we expect your debut…in politics…?You are so passionate…18..I’s in that post of yours….all the answers …no doubt.

        Reply
  3. Alan Wilkinson

     /  June 10, 2017

    It seemed a very messy campaign by the Conservatives. Lots of backtracks and changing positions. They seem to have managed to make Corbyn look consistent and competent.

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  June 10, 2017

      Morning Sir Alan. Yes Theresa was so different from the steely, optimistic, almost messaianic figure she presented post the Brexit vote. Looking forward to the analyses.

      Reply
    • Missy

       /  June 10, 2017

      There was only one backtrack and changing of position by the Conservatives, that was the social care policy.

      I am not sure what other backtracks you are talking about (unless I have forgotten some due to not much sleep last night – but pretty sure I haven’t).

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  June 10, 2017

        He’s just grumpy.

        Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  June 10, 2017

        Dementia tax, social care, social housing …

        Reply
        • Missy

           /  June 10, 2017

          Dementia Tax was part of the Social Care policy, and not a tax at all, it was twisted to great effect by the opposition, it wasn’t even to do with Dementia specifically, but social care.

          Ah, the social housing – I forgot that one.

          So two around social policy hardly constitutes ‘lots’.

          But yes, they were not good.

          Reply
          • Gezza

             /  June 10, 2017

            I’ve given you an uptick for replying, Missy, because Sir Alan can be damnably mingy with the upticks.

            (I am sure, however, that he must possess some fine qualities because (by all accounts) a damned fine woman married him.)

            Reply
            • Missy

               /  June 10, 2017

              The measure of a man is the type of woman who will put up with him 😉

            • Missy

               /  June 10, 2017

              Or type of man who will put up with him. 🙂

            • Gezza

               /  June 10, 2017

              Yup. Are you married? 😳
              😉

            • Blazer

               /  June 10, 2017

              ‘Yup. Are you married? 😳…totally inappropriate Gezza….personal…and verging on…stalking.
              😉

            • Gezza

               /  June 10, 2017

              You’re right, of course. Please stop doing it. 😉

            • Gezza

               /  June 10, 2017

              You know what your problem is, don’t you Blazer?

            • Gezza

               /  June 11, 2017

              🌼

  4. Missy

     /  June 10, 2017

    In all the focus on the Conservatives we cannot forget the lasses for the SNP. The SNP have lost 19 seats. Nicola Sturgeon criticised Theresa May and said she had lost all credibility, but perhaps she should wonder if she has lost some credibility as well.

    The SNP have lost 19 seats, and the popular vote garnering only 36% of the popular vote (pro union parties gained the majority of the vote). Sturgeon conceded today that the second Independence Referendum may have played a part and she would have to re-think it, but she did not think it was the main reason for the losses.

    Among those that lost their seats are Angus Robertson and Alex Salmond – both to Conservatives.

    Other reports today are suggesting that Nicola Sturgeon may have to step aside as SNP leader, and it could be as soon as next week. If she does it will put more pressure on May to step aside.

    Note, this is the best result for the Conservatives in Scotland in over 30 years, and most are putting it down to their leader. In fact there are some that would like Ruth Davidson to lead the Conservatives Nationally, but as she isn’t a Westminster MP so I am not sure that would be viable.

    Reply
  5. A New Zealand perspective:

    Reply
    • Missy

       /  June 10, 2017

      So Tova O’Brien is repeating what everyone has been saying here since the exit poll came out….

      Reply
      • Exactly. Rehash popular opinion change it up and tell us she knows why May should go. I’d rather get my info from the British press Tova.

        Reply
  6. Reply
    • Vance comes from there.

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  June 10, 2017

        Christ. You don’t have to tell me that. That accent ought to be illegal.

        Reply
        • I was in The Falls Rd area some time ago and I swear that without reading lips you’d not understand a one of them.

          Reply
          • Gezza

             /  June 10, 2017

            I dunno what is trav. I don’t usually have a problem with accented English if it’s still pefectly intelligible. I even seem to like most accents in that case, & some accents are really pleasing to my ear. It’s nothing to do with my Irish ancestry, I know that. But a strong NI accent just really jars with me. Think i’d rather listen to an enraged Dutchman screaming unintelligible insults in German than Andrea Vance.

            Reply
            • Conspiratoor

               /  June 10, 2017

              G, you wouldn’t have a show in hell with a taffy from the vulleys

          • Gezza

             /  June 11, 2017

            If ya ever back there in Falls Road, trav, & ya run into Danny Butler, my butcher would like his apron back!

            Reply
  7. Reply
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  10. Labour takes Kensington. That’s a first!! 20 vote majority

    Reply
    • Blazer

       /  June 10, 2017

      ‘BBC reporting that Jeremy Corbyn has done more to increase his party’s vote share than any British leader since Clement Atlee in 1945.’

      ‘Diane Abbott, under vociferous and relentless attack from virtually the entire British press, just increased her majority by over 11,000.’……@Missy.

      Reply
      • Missy

         /  June 10, 2017

        Not sure of your point singling me out on that Blazer. I have never said Diane Abbott wouldn’t do well in her constituency, she is in Hackney which is a safe Labour seat, and Labour MPs have generally increased their majority in safe seats as former UKIP voters have returned to their pre-UKIP parties (there were a lot of Labour voters in 2015 who went to UKIP), and Liberal Democrat / Green voters voted tactically to keep out the Conservatives.

        Maybe instead of just repeating what you see on the internet you could add some value and comment occasionally.

        And if you want to direct a repeated media comments to me maybe actually make your point instead of expecting me to be able to read your mind. I have a lot of talents, and quite clever about some things, but I have yet to master mind reading from half a world away.

        Reply
        • Blazer

           /  June 10, 2017

          you made some very derogatory remarks about Diane Abbott if my memory…serves me…well.

          Reply
          • Missy

             /  June 10, 2017

            Yes, well deserved, she is incompetent as Shadow Home Secretary, even Labour supporters and activists were saying so. Next to Abbott Theresa May looked statesman like. But I never said she would lose her seat, so still not sure of your point.

            Reply
            • Blazer

               /  June 10, 2017

              a lot of people like her…so your charge of incompetence doesn’t wash…’Diane Abbott has increased her already impressive majority in Hackney North and Stoke Newington by 11,000, despite an onslaught of negative press in the weeks prior to the election.

              The Labour MP won 42,265 votes, 75 per cent of the total count, ‘Who that stood can match …that?

            • Missy

               /  June 10, 2017

              Blazer you don’t know what you are talking about, she might be a reasonable local MP, or even a good local MP, but as Shadow Home Secretary she was incompetent – and it isn’t just my charge. There is a reason she has spent the majority of her Parliamentary career on the back benches and most of it is to do with her ability.

              You are showing quite a lot of ignorance about her.

              Here is a question, if she was so competent why did the Labour Party try to gag her? The only reason she got on TV / Radio was because she bypassed Labour process and set the interviews up herself, in general the labour party – and Corbyn’s office in particular – did not want her appearing in the media, precisely because she was incompetent.

              Also, maybe you could point to where she showed competency in her portfolio during the election, since you seem to believe I am wrong. Is it competency when she hasn’t read a major terror report before doing a TV interview days after a terrorist attack? Is it competency to launch a policy and not be able to answer simple questions about it? Is it competency to pull out of a debate and lie about it?

              Seriously you are deluded if you think she is a competent Shadow Home Secretary. She is in that position because she is totally loyal to Corbyn, and no other reason.

            • PDB

               /  June 10, 2017

              To be fair Missy you are arguing with a guy who thinks NZ Labour have the ‘talent’ to effectively run our country……..wouldn’t waste your time personally.

            • Missy

               /  June 10, 2017

              True PDB. But on this his ignorance needs some attempt at re-education, I am sure the lefties will appreciate that, they are after all fans of re-education. 😉

            • Blazer

               /  June 10, 2017

              talking about competence and ministers you are clearly not au fait with Nick Smith,Paula Bennett,Murray McCully ,and Gerry Brownlee ,who are all senior National Party cabinet ministers down here in..NZ.Loyalty seems to be their only…qualification.

            • PDB

               /  June 10, 2017

              Yip, when you have Jacinda ‘done nothing at all’ Ardern at number 2 in the Labour party following Andrew ‘can’t win an electorate seat’ Little it’s pretty hard to compete……

            • Blazer

               /  June 10, 2017

              considering Abbott has fought prejudice,sexism,and misogyny her entire career you should have some…respect!

            • Gezza

               /  June 10, 2017

              These days, who hasn’t?

            • Missy

               /  June 10, 2017

              Why should I respect her? She is a racist, misandrist, who hates her country and is incompetent in the position she was put into her.

              All women have fought forms of prejudice, sexism, and misogyny our entire lives, but most of us don’t pull the racism / sexism card when we are called out on our incompetencies, and she should not either.

              Only liberals excuse incompetency based on race / gender, which in itself is bigoted and sexist, suggesting that someone’s race or gender means they need to have excuses made when they can’t do their job.

              A white middle class male would never have got away with her level of incompetency, and would not have garnered any respect, she is a feminist who wants to be treated equally to men, then she should take the criticism of her competency without falling back on the race / gender argument.

            • Blazer

               /  June 10, 2017

              ‘Abbott’s speech on civil liberties, in the debate on the Counter-Terrorism Bill 2008[11] won The Spectator magazine’s “Parliamentary Speech of the Year” award[12][13] and further recognition at the 2008 Human Rights awards.[1’…
              ‘Abbott is founder of the London Schools and the Black Child initiative, which aims to raise educational achievement levels amongst black children.[16]’
              ‘Following her move onto the front-bench, the Telegraph said on 27 September 2011 that Abbott had “become one of Labour’s best front bench performers”.[26]

              theres a few comments from Wiki that indicate she deserves…respect.Plenty..more.

            • Gezza

               /  June 10, 2017

              Yeah … and the rest! Quite an interesting page when it’s not just cherry picked.
              https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diane_Abbott

    • Blazer

       /  June 10, 2017

      home of the wealthy….what happened…a recount..for..sure.

      Reply
    • Missy

       /  June 10, 2017

      From listening to many voters on talkback there seems to be a strong element of punishment in the voting not a true turn to Labour as such – especially in the traditional Conservative areas, so it will be interesting how long Labour can hold these areas.

      Also, this was a high Remain area, and there were a number of voters that wanted to punish Conservatives for calling the Referendum and then going through with Brexit.

      Reply
      • Blazer

         /  June 10, 2017

        excuses,excuses,you got it way wrong as did the right wing media and their attack campaigns against….Corbyn.

        Reply
        • PDB

           /  June 10, 2017

          Did Corbyn win the election Blazer? I must’ve missed that.

          Reply
          • Missy, remind yourself you’re dealing with the blindly partisan. Tories and Conservatives are hated just, well, because It’s really just like shooting fish in a barrel.

            Reply
            • Blazer

               /  June 10, 2017

              do…behave!You and Missy are not…partisan….BOL.

            • We’re not blinded by ideology and we don’t hate on reasonable argument that just doesn’t fit with our agenda.

            • Missy

               /  June 10, 2017

              Aware of that Trav thanks. Blazer is a typical liberal – I assume male – considering some of his past comments.

              Speaking of liberal males, here is one who received a slap down from JK Rowling. I am no fan of JK Rowling, but I respect her for standing up to this twat calling the PM a whore.

              http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4590478/JK-Rowling-goes-epic-Twitter-tirade-against-Corbyn-fan.html

            • Blazer

               /  June 10, 2017

              I hope you read that J.K Rowling ‘slapdown’…and absorb the rationale regarding her conclusions.

            • I’m about as interested in fiction as I am stale bread.

            • That story about JK Rowling heartens me. The way men get stuck into Conservtaive women using such vitriol and misogynist language has always stunned me.

            • Blazer

               /  June 10, 2017

              not interested in…fiction!Surely you jest….as for conservative women,I love homemade marmalade and strawberry jam.Don’t tell me ,I bet your fav….is….raspberry.

  11. Joe Bloggs

     /  June 10, 2017

    Corbyn has just won 41% of the vote against May’s 44%, and has given Labour the largest increase in the share of the vote over the party’s previous general election performance since Clement Attlee in 1945. In short, he’s turned around the electoral fortunes of the Labour party more than any other party leader in 70 years.

    And without any backroom deals with big business …

    https://www.counterpunch.org/2017/06/09/the-facts-proving-corbyns-election-triumph/

    If May thinks she can consistently rely on the votes of a small group of Northern Irish Ulster unionists for her mandate then she’s as big a chump as trump

    Reply
    • PDB

       /  June 10, 2017

      The irony is that Corbyn staying on is also a disaster for the Labour party long term.

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  June 10, 2017

        Well, we’ll see. It’s an impressive turnaround for him. He may have learned a lot. He’s been the face of Labour, so it’s down to him, & even his internal critics may just have to back off & re-evaluate the messages, the audience, the policies, & the man.

        Reply
        • PDB

           /  June 10, 2017

          This election was a one-off mainly due to the inadequacies & arrogance of May rather than anything Corbyn did or offered. Aside from this election Corbyn has been a disaster as Labour leader (as most of his own party would attest to) and I can see that will again become the norm.

          Reply
          • Blazer

             /  June 10, 2017

            your analysis is completely at odds with expert political commentators …and I regret to inform you ,your wishful thinking is …misguided as you will see in the very near future.

            Reply
            • David

               /  June 10, 2017

              ” completely at odds with expert political commentators”

              Sound place to be.

            • PDB

               /  June 10, 2017

              The same ‘expert political commentators’ that barely get anything correct?

            • Missy

               /  June 10, 2017

              Blazer perhaps instead of just saying stuff put a link – or two – up to show how his analysis is at odds with expert political commentators so that they can be scrutinised.

              My experience is the analysis is different depending on what side of the divide the ‘expert’ political commentators are from.

              Oh, and The Standard does not count as expert political commentary.

            • Blazer

               /  June 10, 2017

              @Missy…’Blazer perhaps instead of just saying stuff put a link – or two – ‘
              ‘ you could add some value and comment occasionally.’…make up your mind!


              The Standard does not count as expert political commentary.’…pray tell…what does..in your…world?

          • Gezza

             /  June 10, 2017

            At least it looks like he has engaged young voters, PDB. It’s their futures they’re voting for. If they now get to re-evaluate both parties, that’s a good thing, isn’t it?

            Reply
            • PDB

               /  June 10, 2017

              Young voters that know nothing of what they vote for……..a return to failed socialist economic policies of the past that would destroy any future they might have by crippling the economy & making the UK uncompetitive, not to mention weak internationally.

            • Blazer

               /  June 10, 2017

              @PDB…Is that a political broadcast on behalf of the conventional…’establishment’?You are so resistant to change and so dogmatic about failing paradigms,it is almost unbelievable.You just posted the ultimate,tired…cliché….

            • PDB

               /  June 10, 2017

              Blazer: “You just posted the ultimate, tired…cliché….”

              From the king of………..tired…clichés!

              The point is you don’t throw the baby out with the bathwater and take an extreme hard-left turn because a few things aren’t working out as you would like. The best balance is somewhere in the centre, a balancing act which the New Zealand govt achieves far better than the current UK govt.

          • Missy

             /  June 10, 2017

            Agree, there was a strong element of punishing May for calling the election in this one.

            The Conservatives tend to punish candidates for local (and national) decisions, but will always return. A good example is Richmond. Last year Zac Goldsmith resigned from the Conservative party forcing a by election, the voters punished him for doing that by either not turning up to vote, or changing their vote, allowing the Lib Dems to take it. This week Zac Goldsmith (back in the Conservative party fold) won the seat back. Essentially he was making a point, and the voters didn’t like him doing it so voted him out, but it was always going to go back to the Conservatives.

            In this election many saw it as unnecessary, and they were sick of elections / referendums, so punished the Conservatives, however, the irony is that they may have to go back to the polls later this year.

            Reply
        • Imagine Gezza, the man who has voted against his own party nearly 500 times running the government.

          Reply
          • Gezza

             /  June 10, 2017

            Shit. That sounds a lot. Was this when it was being run by that undeclared war criminal, Blair?

            Reply
            • Corbyn voted against the Labour whip on 428 occasions under Blair and Brown and 617 times in total since he became an MP in 1983.

            • Gezza

               /  June 11, 2017

              Was it the same whip! Was he a right prick?

          • Blazer

             /  June 11, 2017

            yes ,its very hard for Tories to understand principled politicians.They prefer obedient party lap dogs that toe the…line.

            Reply
            • Do you get bored with platitudes and cliches.? There are many principled Tories.

            • Blazer

               /  June 11, 2017

              I do get bored with clichés,definately need to take more care.Ad hominum epithets are also a work…in..progress.

    • You conveniently forget that both Trump and May have some sort of a mandate. Trump took 77 more seats than the Dems and Theresa May 56 more than Labour.

      “Improving a vote” might be interesting, but it will only have significance as it’s consigned to the next history book.

      Reply
  12. Gezza

     /  June 10, 2017

    @ PDB

    “Young voters that know nothing of what they vote for……..a return to failed socialist economic policies of the past that would destroy any future they might have by crippling the economy & making the UK uncompetitive, not to mention weak internationally.”

    So, you are saying, at their age, you shouldn’t have got the vote, because you didn’t know wtf was good for you, is that correct?

    Reply
    • PDB

       /  June 10, 2017

      I think you have jumped the shark – I’m not saying youth shouldn’t get to vote, simply that youth are more likely to vote for ‘progressive’ (ahem) policies and be less informed than their more life experienced older voters – many of which can remember what such policies can do to stifle an economy.

      Reply
      • Missy

         /  June 10, 2017

        “If you are not a liberal at 25 you have no heart, if you are not a conservative at 35 you have no brain”

        Quote from unknown, but a version of this is often accredited to Churchill.

        Reply
        • Blazer

           /  June 10, 2017

          I prefer this version….’If you are not a liberal at 25 you have no brain, if you are a conservative at 35 you have no heart”

          Reply
          • PDB

             /  June 10, 2017

            “To understand the workings of American politics, you have to understand this fundamental law: Conservatives think liberals are stupid. Liberals think conservatives are evil.” — Charles Krauthammer

            Reply
      • Gezza

         /  June 10, 2017

        I just rode a porpoise, really. You seemed to be saying young people haven’t a clue or they’d vote for the party with the philosophies & policies you agree with. Thanks for the clarification.

        Reply
        • PDB

           /  June 10, 2017

          Everybody that wants to vote should vote, except lazy arses that turn up on election day without bothering to enroll…..

          Reply
  13. Alan Wilkinson

     /  June 10, 2017

    Will May be rolled? Bookmakers have odds on Boris.

    Reply
    • Missy

       /  June 10, 2017

      Eventually, but not immediately. Most are saying within 6 months.

      Boris is clear favourites, also in the running are:

      Philip Hammond
      Amber Rudd
      David Davis

      Outsiders are:
      Sajid Javid
      Michael Gove

      I think personally it might be good for them to get someone fresh, like Sajid Javid or another unknown back bencher. Interestingly George Osborne said on Thursday night that there were a number of very talented backbenchers who could easily come through as leader and would be good for the party.

      The Cabinet Ministers have too much baggage coming with them.

      Just a note on Hammond, Johnson, Rudd, and Davis, it is interesting that they have all retained their cabinet positions and it was decided yesterday. Prior to the election it was widely reported that both Hammond and Johnson were most likely going to be demoted (they are the two that have had the most fractious relationship with May), and that Rudd would be promoted to Chancellor. I wonder how much of the decision to keep them is based on the fact that they are odds on favourites to roll May – I would suggest a lot. There were unconfirmed reports that on Thursday night Boris was already sounding out other members about his chances of becoming leader.

      Reply
      • Amber Rudd must be a long shot – didn’t she just hold on to her electorate?

        Reply
        • Missy

           /  June 10, 2017

          Amber Rudd is one of the top 4 favourites. Yes she did just hold her seat, but she is viewed very well within the party and did a great performance during the election campaign. She stood in for May at the leaders debate 2 days after her father died and did extremely well, many saying she did better than May would have – especially considering the hostility from both the other leaders and the audience. After that many were tipping her to be the next leader.

          On a local level all reports say Rudd’s campaign was excellent, like most Conservative areas the general feeling is that the Conservatives were being punished. I am not sure if Hastings & Rye was one, but in a number of seats – especially in the south – only one or two candidates from the left stood, and voters who would normally vote Green were encouraged to vote Labour, as were Lib Dem voters in some areas – hence the decreased vote share for Liberal Democrats (1.8% down from 7.9% in 2015), and Greens (0.2% down from 3.8%). Most of those lost votes are believed to have gone to Labour.

          The slim majority of her seat is the only real negative for Rudd, so it will most likely come down to whether she wants to run and risk her seat at the next General Election, or if she is happy being in Cabinet and wants to focus the General Elections on local campaigning.

          Reply
        • Missy

           /  June 10, 2017

          Michael Gove and Sajid Javid are the two outsiders at the moment.

          Reply
        • She has 300 odd majority. Not good enough. Hammond is wet, wet, wet.

          I’m pumping for Davis and Boris. Gove for Brexit negotiations

          Reply

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