‘Suffering in silence’ from racism

The Human Rights Commission today launched a new campaign against racial intolerance, fronted by actor and director Taika Waititi.

RNZ:  New Zealanders ‘suffering in silence’ from racism

Racial intolerance is getting worse in New Zealand but most of those targeted suffer in silence, Race Relations Commissioner Susan Devoy says.

She said Waititi, as New Zealander of the Year, was an obvious choice to front the ‘Give Nothing To Racism’ campaign – and she contacted him while he was away working in the United States.

“I sent him a letter, and some Pineapple Lumps, to Los Angeles,” she said. “He took a day off working on Thor and did this.”

Dame Susan said one in three formal complaints to the Human Rights Commission was about racial discrimination, but the overwhelming majority of people never complained when they were humiliated or abused.

“I’m seeing and hearing every day from people in the community that are talking about the racial attacks on them,” she told Morning Report.

When there was an event such as a terrorist attack overseas, Muslim people, particularly women and children, were targeted, she said.

“Women who are visually diverse in New Zealand who wear a hijab talk all the time about being racially abused at bus stops and schools and in their communities.

“And what is sad about that is nobody comes to their defence.”

No one group was being targeted in New Zealand, and racist abuse was not limited to recent immigrants.

“Fourth-generation New Zealanders are still telling me that they’re the butt of racist jokes or being told to go home,” she said

There was a rise in racial hatred overseas and in New Zealand.

“I believe that things are getting worse and the reality is most people don’t complain about this.”

Dame Susan said everyone had a responsibility to speak up against racism, and urged politicians to refrain from pulling the race card in the lead-up to the election.

Winston peters reacted negatively to this.

This is the second stage of the commission’s anti-racism campaign. Last September it launched the ‘That’s Us’ campaign with a website that enabled people to share their personal stories of racism.

 

49 Comments

  1. MaureenW

     /  June 16, 2017

    Is this really about racial hatred, or rather attempting to mind-control the population out of observing noticeable differences?
    Some people don’t like pit-bulls, while others prefer poodles. They’re both dogs – let’s have a campaign for them too?

  2. Alan Wilkinson

     /  June 16, 2017

    There is racism and stereotyping unfortunately. And it goes in both directions. Fortunately sexual attraction is often strong enough to overcome it.

    • Gezza

       /  June 16, 2017

      Every now & then, Sir Alan, you come up an eminiently quotable quote that is right on the button !

      Plagiaristically yours, as always
      Sir Gerald.

  3. Gezza

     /  June 16, 2017

    Winston peters reacted negatively to this.

    “This is the second stage of the commission’s anti-racism campaign. Last September it launched the ‘That’s Us’ campaign with a website that enabled people to share their personal stories of racism.”

    I’m not seeing negativity in that statement? Is a separate post coming on that?

    • Zena

       /  June 16, 2017

      Its such a pointless thing to debate as Winston is being labelled a racist for not wanting to have any maori seats at which point you really no longer have a common ground to debate the issue.

      • MaureenW

         /  June 16, 2017

        @ Zena
        Could we ask Dame Susan whether it’s racist to have Maori Seats or racist not to have Maori Seats? I don’t know anymore which one is racist – perhaps they both are.

        • PDB

           /  June 16, 2017

          The lefty manual says minority groups can’t be racist.

          • Mefrostate

             /  June 16, 2017

            Lefty here, sure they can. Every group has a few noisy assholes.

            • Brown

               /  June 17, 2017

              True but my impression of the left is that those assholes go on to be the leaders with clapping and back slaps all around.

            • sorethumb

               /  June 17, 2017

              Devoy is aiming at New Zealanders opposed to immigration from places that threaten the identity of European New Zealanders. In that sense she isn’t being a Martin Luther King, she is being a supra-national (globalist).
              She likes to use the anecdote of a Chinese New Zealander from gold rush days who is mistaken for a recent arrival. Recently it was a group in a car who called out “go back home” another was a public servant who asked a workmate “where are you from”. Her point is that the Chinese have always been here, so nothing to see, move on. Photographer Philip Temples book – Christchurch a City and It’s Peoples (1974,1984) shows the truth.
              The goal here is an ethnicless society where national identity is managed by government using the media (“super ordinate national identity”). That is why RNZ and TVNZ have campaigns such as “how Kiwi are You” and “my Kiwi”.

              “This work thus suggests that for multiculturalism to succeed* identities need to be transformed*. And, importantly, as Kymlicka suggests, this transformation applies not only to the minority but also to the majority. Indeed, perhaps *the major identity transformation is required from members of the majority as their attributes are, as a rule, the same as the ones that define the national identity*. Minorities need to be written into the self-definition of the national identity such as to imbue them with existential legitimacy as citizens in parity with the majority.”
              “Such civic definitions serve to place *the majority group as a sub-group within the system of intergroup relations*, which allows for a new identity to emerge. Legitimacy and status as members of the new community are then less likely to be defined by ethnicity. Such civic based definitions also shape sub-group relations such that ethnically-defined difference becomes less relevant to the community as a whole.”

              [Enter Susan Devoy whose job it is to control the resident cat when it attacks the flat mates cat]

              “In a multiethnic/multicultural society, the shift from an exclusive to an inclusive definition of the national prototype requires the emergence of *new and consistent discourses about who ‘we’ are (see Kymlicka, 1995).* Discourses that do not appeal to ethnic heritage and traditions but to civic values. It is in this context that the role of political leadership comes into place in changing the discourse and creating a consensual view of the national prototype such that it becomes shared by the members of a polity (see Uberoi & Modood, 2013). Moreover, there needs to be an institutionalisation of the public discourse as in line with terms outlined by Parekh (2006).

              [political correctness – Nigel Latta – The New New Zealand. State “truthiness”]

              Once the group prototype has shifted to a more inclusive definition, identification with the group should lead to greater tolerance toward diversity, because it is the subgroups’ differences that make them similar. Moreover, identification with a social category defined by diversity, inclusivity, and civic values, is more likely to facilitate intergroup solidarity.”

              [but has immigration made the original ethnic majority better off? The Economy????!!]

              [Is it all based on a faulty view of human nature – the human mind as Tabula rasa – a blank state?]
              The Social Psychology of Social (Dis)harmony: Implications for Political Leaders and

              Public Policy

              Luisa Batalha, Katherine J. Reynolds & Emina Subasic

              Australian National University

            • Gezza

               /  June 17, 2017

              Have you ever met PartisanZ ?

            • MaureenW

               /  June 17, 2017

              Very interesting @Sorethumb. Pity John Key’s flag change failed, in my mind there was only one reason for this and it wasn’t about the colour.

  4. patupaiarehe

     /  June 16, 2017

    When there was an event such as a terrorist attack overseas, Muslim people, particularly women and children, were targeted, she said.

    • patupaiarehe

       /  June 16, 2017

      I did think that video was very well done. People should think a bit harder about what they say.

      • PDB

         /  June 16, 2017

        Yes, not a bad vid – the other problem of course not mentioned is the opposite effect where people call all sorts of people ‘racist’ for statements clearly not racist rendering the word completely useless in a modern context.

        • patupaiarehe

           /  June 16, 2017

          Let’s be honest Pants, we’re all a little prejudiced in our own different ways.

          • PDB

             /  June 16, 2017

            ‘Intent’ is probably the key issue.

    • Blazer

       /  June 18, 2017

      you are alot harder on Devoy than..Wagner…where does she say Muslims are a..race?

      • patupaiarehe

         /  June 18, 2017


        I suggest you read the article above again, Blazer

        • patupaiarehe

           /  June 18, 2017

          Women who are visually diverse in New Zealand who wear a hijab talk all the time about being racially abused at bus stops and schools and in their communities.

          You’re welcome, Blazer

          • Blazer

             /  June 18, 2017

            that does not constitute evidence that Devoy said muslims are a race.You are welcome..too.

  5. sorethumb

     /  June 16, 2017

    The problem here is anti-racism, not racism. fact: NZrs didn’t want diversity. Now Asians make up 1/4 of the population. Why? Because the Labour government 1986, didn’t want to be racist,

  6. sorethumb

     /  June 16, 2017

    There is nothing wrong with a Kiwi marrying an Asian, but they are now 1/4 of the population and what has the average person got to show for it? E.g
    Bill Ralston: I mean Marina picking up on the Herald thing and based on your massive study. Going back (I think it was 2001) 67%of our island city was pakeha. Now it is down to 54% and falling rapidlyIt wont be long before Pakeha Aucklanders are a minority. Is that necessarliy a good thing or could it be a bad thing?

    Marina Mathews: I think it could be a good thing. I’ll just draw on my experiences working 10 years in the public sector in Wellington. I mean when you look at Wellington it has it’s own ethnoburbs as well. Um the population and ethnicity of folk in Eastbourne (across the water) is a bit different to that of Cannons Creek by Porirua . So it is slightly systematic. It ‘s starting to grow across NZ. Asia NZ did a survey (a 2015 report)on the population of house buyers in Auckland. It was just a little more scientific than Phil Twyford may have ventured about people who had surnames that might have sounded like some foreign word who were house owners. What they did say is that 25% of the population of Pine Hill in NZ are Chinese. Um 10% of the population of house owners in Glenn Innes are Indian and so what is happening as a result is that businesses are having to alter what they are doing, how they are delivering and how they are coping. The number one seller at Pac nSave in Albany is white rice (not white potatoes). Another big seller is chicken feet. And so you are seeng the market (I love the French market in Parrnell) It’s a lot different to if I went down to Otara on a saturday.

    Ralston: It’s a lot different to if you went down Sandringham Road where there’s a whole pile of medium spice shopsand Restuarants, um and down the back of Dominion Road there is the biggest Chinese Supermarket I’ve ever seen (bout 2 or 3 football fields in size) and you can buy whatever you want. That’s the gift, I suppose, that diversity brings.

    Rod Oram: Absolutely! That makes Auckland a fabulously interesting city. And obviously the key thing we need to care a lot about about are that people are moving around and are appreciating and taking more interest year round rather ratjher than just turning up at Albert Park for a lantern show or Diwhali festival. And of course there are people who just hunker downin their neighbourhood or their community. But I’d like to thinkthere are people particularily amongst the younger generation who are strong in their own identity but are keen to appreciate other identities too.
    http://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/smarttalk/audio/201778519/smart-talk-at-the-auckland-museum-auckland-as-an-island

    • Brown

       /  June 17, 2017

      The comparison of Eastbourne and Cannons Creek is valid. Which suburb is more desirable and why?

  7. sorethumb

     /  June 16, 2017

    And of course the Japanese value their heritage and identity. What I am talking about here is populations on a population, not individuals.
    As much as people rail about a poll tax, China is “almost entirely closed to new entrants except by birth”
    http://www.economist.com/news/briefing/21710264-worlds-rising-superpower-has-particular-vision-ethnicity-and-nationhood-has

  8. sorethumb

     /  June 16, 2017

    Before you can have an intelligent conversation about racism you also have to consider the human tendency to ethnocentrism (pot calling kettle black).
    http://www.pnas.org/content/108/4/1262.abstract

  9. I grew up in a strongly bi-cultural NZ situation. I had as much of an exposure to what now many might characterise as a 60s sanitised, “Howard Morrison Quartet” type of Māori culture, it certainly wasn’t a eurocentric childhood, Māori people and their culture played a large part in my life. In addition, our family best friends were 5th generation Chinese New Zealanders. Whether that’s the reason I’ve always embraced immigration, travel and rich culture I don’t know. In my schools we had many immigrants, mainly Dutch, but my growing up experience, in particular to Māori in provincial North Island NZ, seems in sharp contrast to say, South Islanders of my acquaintance. Still now, heading south feels like a sanitised whitewash of the life we have in Auckland. We always comment on it. Seems strange, the further south you get. It’s like another country.

    • sorethumb

       /  June 17, 2017

      I realise the European rat annihilated the Polynesian rat. I don’t believe the TOW addressed the rapid demographic change following it’s signing. “Demographics is destiny”. However you have to consider the role of our academic institutions: post colonial studies; Maori studies; critical white studies and the formulation of identity politics which creates a mythical Edin based on “diversity”, in a space devoid of economic and environmental context.
      Ranganui Walker summed it up: “”Close the immigration door completely… I object to people from all those countries coming here… If that trend continues, we will ruin New Zealand. We will make it just like any other part of the world” ; “The lizards of our colonial past are being laid to rest in the bedrooms of the nation” .

      • “you have to consider the role of our academic institutions: post colonial studies; Maori studies; critical white studies and the formulation of identity politics which creates a mythical (Edin) based on “diversity”, in a space devoid of economic and environmental context.”

        Sorry, I’d say most of “born” Pacific,Maori, Pakeha kiwi still see NZ in terms of rugby and soccer sidelines on a Saturday, the pub or somebody’s lounge on a test night. As far as the void of eco/enviro context – what do you mean please?

        • sorethumb

           /  June 17, 2017

          The scale of Auckland’s growth. You come over the Bombay hill and hit sprawl. You go scuba diving and so is everyone else. You go hiking and so is everyone else. You go to the beach and so is everyone else. Infill housing only started in the 1970’s/80’s.
          Cars and traffic. The streets are clogged with cars (whether moving or parked). High rises tower above a human scale (unless there is sufficient space around). As Ranganui Walker feared “just like anywhere else”.

          • Have you lived in really big cities. Auckland in a minion in comparison, it’s just we’re inevitably grappling with the return of all the Oz crowd and, seemingly, an entire suburb of both Beijing and Delhi annually. We need to sort that, not curb migration. Even the Tangata When were migrants. We all are……

            I love this, relevance to conversation starts at 40 seconds

  10. sorethumb

     /  June 17, 2017

    We are all migrants is a logical fallacy.
    When I was a kid the teacher showed us a movie made in 1941 called 100 Crowded Years

    Who built the mountain passes, Lyttelton Tunnel, Benmore Dam, MacKenzie Canals, Raurimu Spiral, broke in the hill country (“bridge to nowhere”), the countries ports etc, etc. This country was developed by it’s European and Maori settlers.

  11. Alan Wilkinson

     /  June 17, 2017

    Stop the world! I want to get off.

    Is that really the future we want for ourselves and this country?
    I don’t think so. But I accept there are two types of people – those who see the world as a fascinating opportunity and those who see it as a threatening menace. Politicians try to please both sides which usually produces a mess.

  12. I grew up during the 1950s in a large international seaport in England called Liverpool. You could walk any day down virtually any street in Liverpool and encounter people from pretty much every race on the planet. Mostly they rubbed along. Some groups were disliked by others, but the cause was more often attitude than ethnicity.

    Then the Lefty politicians decided to invent ‘racism’, mostly in pursuit of votes and/or self-importance. Every minor conflagration between criminals in Liverpool 8 was designated a race riot, simply because most of the criminals in Liverpool 8 happened to be black. Lots of politicians got their names in lots of socialist newspapers, and all the Liverpudlians were scratching their heads, thinking they had woken up in the wrong city.

    Judging by the utterances I have read from Susan Devoy she seems tarred with the same brush as those Lefty politicians in England. Her, and their spoutings are more likely, it seems to me, to create racial disharmony than cure it. People with different attitudes to life will likely not get on well. Really? Who would have thought it? Leave them alone.

    I was in a pub in Glasgow one night, filled with the sort of Scots who loathe the English and one aggressively accosted me on hearing my accent. “Are ye English?” he bellowed threateningly. Thinking quickly, I responded: “No. I’m from Liverpool.” He immediately put his arm round my shoulders with a grin and said: “That’s alright then. What’re you drinking?” There is a simple moral in that tale that racism zealots would do well to ponder on.

    • Gezza

       /  June 17, 2017

      Sorry Sailor. Posted in the wrong place accidentally. See my comment below.

    • Blazer

       /  June 18, 2017

      yes slavery,racism and even inequality are all a fiction dreamed up by the nasty…left.

  13. Gezza

     /  June 17, 2017

    Thanks for that. You write well.

    “There is a simple moral in that tale that racism zealots would do well to ponder on.”

    There are a couple of things I could conclude after reading your post. Just so I’m clear, what specifically is the moral you want to impart?

    • Hello Gezza, thank you for the nice comment. As I saw it the differences between Scotland and England that cause so many Scots to dislike the English were eclipsed by the similarities between two great cosmopolitan seaports on the west coasts of the two countries. The former differences tend to be largely imaginary and third-hand, whereas the similarities between two gritty international seaports, sharing the west coast wind and rain, are very real, and the sense of comradeship between them that much stronger.

      The key to harmonious relationships is similar outlooks on life. However much you legislate you cannot force people to like one another. If Group A dislikes Group B then it is more constructive to wonder why they do than it is to criminalise the fact that they do. I taught my children from an early age that the most important word in the English language is ‘Why’; and I wish more of these authoritarian social dictators would do the same.

      When I was a young Cadet at Naval College we had many other cadets from across the world in our midst. The Brits generally got on well with the Kiwis because their attitudes were similar, but much less so with the Aussies. The Brits generally got on well with the Ghanaians because their senses of humour were similar, but not so much with the Nigerians; and so on. None of it was anything to do with ‘race’ as such, just national characteristics; and while such may be generalisations they are, in the real world, quite real, simply because of the cultures the folk share while growing up.

      You don’t need to be a rocket scientist to understand that “Birds of a feather flock together”. If you don’t like a group of people, avoid them; if you want to join them, reach out to them; if they don’t want you, accept it. On which note, I will leave you to figure out why no-one at Naval College got on with the Iranians.

      • Blazer

         /  June 18, 2017

        human nature…never changes…thats the reality.Your regimented cookie cut out views belong in ..the past.

      • Gezza

         /  June 18, 2017

        Thanks sailor. I like that.

      • Gezza

         /  June 19, 2017

        And I know what you mean. This is like when you’re in the middle of a getting-testy discussion with a Maori chap about The Treaty in a pub in London, & a bunch of no-hopers who talk through their noses from across the ditch walk in & make some smart-arse remark about the Shaky Isles. No doubt which nation we both come from then, & the bouncers know it too when they tell both groups to pack it in or take it outside.

  14. sorethumb

     /  June 17, 2017

    A critical issue that is being explored by urban researchers at the University of Oslo is how the various ethnic groups within an increasingly divided city can be influential as Oslo enters a millennium when ALL populations in the major cities of the industrialised world must become more ethnically diverse and cosmopolitan.
    The ‘era of the whites’, as Anthony Browne (2000) put it in his provocative examination of “The Colour of the Future”, is passing even for cities such as Oslo. Browne (2000) goes on to observe:
    In its World Population Profile 1998, the US Census Bureau predicts that by the second decade of this century all the net gain in the world population will be in developing countries. … The global center of gravity is changing. In 1900 Europe had a quarter of the world’s population and three times that of Africa. By 2050, Europe is predicted to have just 7 percent of the world population, and a third that of Africa. The ageing and declining populations of
    predominantly white nations have prompted forecasts of — and calls for — more immigration from the young and growing populations of developing nations to make up the shortfall. …

    One demographer, who does not want to be named for fear of being called racist, says: ‘It’s a matter of pure arithmetic that, if nothing else happens, non-Europeans will become a majority and whites a minority in the UK. That would probably be the first time an indigenous population has voluntarily become a minority in its historic homeland’. ….
    In California, in a land built by immigrants, [and where the Anglo- Saxon whites are already a minority], lieutenant governor Bustmente puts a positive spin on the end of the white majority: ‘If there are no majorities, there are no minorities’.
    In Europe, with its 40,000 year old indigenous white population, the rise of a non-European majority may not be greeted with such equanimity.
    GLOBALISATION AND THE TRANSFORMATION OF URBAN
    SOCIETIES IN ‘NEW WORLD’ CITIES ON THE ASIA-PACIFIC RIM
    Richard Bedford (2000)
    …..
    “Well what you said about the nation, I agree with that. The nation is a racist mechanism both internally and externally in the way it includes and excludes, ah, the nation it comes form the word natio which means to be born is a racist concept. To move beyond that is one of the settled tasks.

    …….
    This is coming from the UN and Social Science and Humanities Departments.
    Note how the Japanese aren’t having any part of this (what about robots and AI)?

    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  June 18, 2017

      The world is full of idiots and it doesn’t matter much what colour they are but it does matter what they are taught to believe. Importing stupid beliefs is much worse than importing stupid people. Especially if those beliefs are maintained once imported.

      • Blazer

         /  June 18, 2017

        what a little ray of sunshine you are..Al…lemon juice on the Weetbix again today!

        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  June 19, 2017

          Nope. Cheese and salami on the croissant, B. Lovely croissants here at our local bakery for $1.50. In Raro they were $4.50 unfilled, horrible taste obviously made with oil instead of butter. My fault, should have stuck with the local foods. The rest of our food was wonderful. When in Rome …