World watch – Sunday

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WorldWatch

Post, news or views on anything happening of interest around the world.

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11 Comments

  1. Gezza

     /  June 18, 2017

    Missy, just curiosity. Watching Aljaz tv reporters interviewing people in London who lived near Grenfell Tower has reminded me of other times when I’ve noticed how odd it sometimes seems to hear people of African, West Indian, Pakistani etc descent speaking wiv va fickest Lundin accents, yeh? Like vay was obviously born veer, yeh? Like vey is true Londoniz, yeh? Like Bri’ish, yeh? Like, so Bri’ish, from Lundin, vey carn even pronounce veir t’s, yeh?

    I was just wondering, from your observations, how well-spudded in to British / London society are descendents of immigrants like these delightful characters? Is there much od a racial divide – are 2nd-generation Londoners of darker complexion & different ethnicities with parents from countries originally different regarded by the populati of more obviously Saxon/Danish/Norman/Celtic stock as being as British as they are?

    Also, unemployment levels over there. Which if any, are the groups most likely to be unemployed, & what does the UK government do, if anything to address the issue of unemployment?

    Reply
    • Missy

       /  June 18, 2017

      On the 2nd generation immigrants issue, I think those from Commonwealth Countries are more integrated than others, the only one’s that seem to enforce segregation for 2nd generation and more would be some of the Muslim communities, predominantly North Africa and Middle Eastern Muslims, many Pakistani Muslims seem to have integrated slightly better. Though I would say from my observations Indians and West Indian seem to have adapted and integrated much better than any other ethnic group. As I say, Commonwealth countries. Another interesting thing I would say from the immigrant community is that European immigrants (1st generation in UK) tend to be quite segregated in their communities as well, which makes the arguments for the EU a little odd since many of the EU citizens don’t integrate into the local communities as well.

      On the unemployment levels I would have to find the statistics, but anecdotally I understand that young working class are the highest levels of unemployment, and there are some that believe young white working class men could be the largest group of unemployed. But I don’t have evidence to back that up, I do know that some statistics released last year said young working class boys are least likely to go onto any form of higher education whether University, Polytechnic, or Apprenticeships.

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  June 18, 2017

        God, it’s like having a twin sister sometimes. I’m up early as usual & checked & there was no one posting, & that thought had run thru my my mind so I thought I’ll just bash that out & if you turn up today you might be sble to tell me. I no sooner hit “Post Comment” than I see you have posted on the QB thread! It’s uncanny, tha’ is. 😀

        Reply
    • Missy

       /  June 18, 2017

      The way you have written what they said, I would note that it sounds like a real working class London accent, often more associated with the South or East than West London (more posh), but it is spreading.

      Reply
  2. Gezza

     /  June 18, 2017

    Aljazeera tv news:

    Battle for Mosul: The number of civilian casualties continues to rise. Fears increasing for the safety of civilians who are not being permitted to leave by ISIS & are shot if they are seen attempting to do so.

    Battle for Raqqa: The Syrian Democratic Forces (Kurds & Sunni Arabs, small number of Christians) say they are making good progress in the battle for the city, ever so slowly starting to take & clear individual suburbs – but ISIS are putting up fierce resistance, utilising their common methods of sniping, movement in & between houses, booby traps, IEDs & car suicide bombers. In Raqqa too, civilians are being forced to stay in their houses & suffer the consequences of the assault. Reports received that some with steel doors have had them welded shut by ISIS. Anyone trying to get out is immediately executed on the spot or shot in the back as they run.

    Reply
    • Ongoing wars, cities being ruined, people being killed – it’s easy to forget about the human versus human horror stories at a distance.

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  June 18, 2017

        In both battles the assaulting forces also have the problem of trying to sift through the populations of the escapees from the cities who manage to get away in the most harrowing circumstances, trying to identify who among them might actually be ISIS fighters or ISIS sympathisers. As ISIS-controlled areas are being reduced, their fighters fall back into their remaining strongholds, but it is certain that when these are taken too, they will exit among what’s left of the shattered populations. All the escapees interviewed have had immediate family members executed by ISIS. The medieval brutality of their rule has traumatised many. Their girls have not been educated. The boys only forced to attend compulsory religious study & hardened to brutalising perceived ISIS enemies or ‘degenerates’ who offend against their interpretation of Islam.

        Reply
        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  June 18, 2017

          The US policy now is to surround ISIS fighters and kill them all. Makes it even harder for trapped civilians to survive. Should have fled when ISIS first took over.

          Reply
          • Gezza

             /  June 18, 2017

            True, and some did, but right from early on, as I understand it, ISIS established checkpoints & patrols to seek out and kill or brutalise residents trying to get away, Alan. They had elderly parents, young children, possessions…. They had no idea how bad these people were until they sealed the citizens in.

            The ordinary people were a resource, & a shield from air attacks, enforceable followers to be re-educated in the true Islam, & used for all the tasks and occupations needed to run & populate a modern city. Their children were prime targets for indoctrination, hardening, & future recruits to the ranks. The leaders of ISIS are not the poor illiterate suicide bombers. Many are educated, elite, former military officers.

            Not as easy for people to have fled as we might think, I imagine.

            Reply
            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  June 18, 2017

              Of course. I understand that and agree. In hindsight when the army of religious lunatics appears on the horizon it is time to run fast and far.

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