Open Forum – Thursday

22 June 2017

Facebook: NZ politics/media+

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46 Comments

  1. Gezza

     /  June 22, 2017

    Shortest day today, according to an iMessage from Big Head, me tuakana (older brother). I’ll be typing faster to get as much as possible in during the daylight. 😐

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  June 22, 2017

      I thought that it was yesterday. After 6 weeks, you will see a difference in the length of the days-that’s when it becomes noticeable. I must remember to count this down on the calendar.

      The shortest and longest days always seem to come at the wrong time-too early in the season.

      Grey old day here, drizzle on and off, can’t make up its bloody mind.The inventor of clothes dryers should be canonised and have streets and towns named after them. So should the inventors of fluffy socks and fluffy dressing gowns.

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  June 22, 2017

        Yaw right ! Great news, Kitty ! Can’t wait to tell him !
        Got one over the smart-arsed sod again ! Woohoo !

        (Still luv him like a 🍀 👬 Irish brother tho ❤️ 👍 )

        Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  June 23, 2017

          A local RC school used to use the shortest day as a fundraiser for charity-it still might, for all I know-the idea was that the day was too short to make it worth getting dressed, so everyone came in jimmyjams, nighties, slippers and dressing gowns and paid for doing so.

          Reply
      • Gezza

         /  June 22, 2017

        “The inventor of clothes dryers should be canonised and have streets and towns named after them. So should the inventors of fluffy socks and fluffy dressing gowns.

        Plenty of cats & dogs have been honoured in that manner. 🐈 🐩

        Reply
        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  June 22, 2017

          Can’t beat possum wool socks, G.

          Reply
          • Gezza

             /  June 22, 2017

            Yes, so I gather Alan. I have a pair of posdum wool gloves & they’re great.

            Reply
            • Gezza

               /  June 22, 2017

              FiP!

            • Gezza

               /  June 22, 2017

              Question Time in The House of Reprehensibles ! 👏

            • Gezza

               /  June 22, 2017

              Damn, I missed Chris Hipkins causing some ruckus before Q’s got started, while getting some toast. Speakers said “completely unnecessary & could lead to disorder.” Anybody see it?

            • Gezza

               /  June 22, 2017

              Ah – I could guess that Hon Paula Bennet, police minister, is absent, so Hon Mr Woodhouse is covering for her. Jacinda getting her chance to show her mettle, such as it may be.

            • Gezza

               /  June 22, 2017

              PM’s absent to. Gerry’s bearing the load for him.

            • duperez

               /  June 22, 2017

              The best moment today was Speaker saying (again) that saying someone of lying, or intimating they were lying wasn’t allowed because it would (paraphrasing) ‘bring to house into disrepute, was unparliamentary, blah-blah.’
              I treasure every time I hear him flannel on in such a way because it leaves it clear that lying in the House is fine but actually calling it what it is, is the crime of the century. 🙂

            • Gezza

               /  June 22, 2017

              @ duperez Yep. I like that. It’s a bit strange. They seem to be able to get away with sayin another member is “not telling yhe truth”, but not that they are lying. Altho I guess the former does at least allow for some interetation meaning that they may not be deliberately telling a falsehood, just that the real or actual truth is different from what they are saying.

        • Kitty Catkin

           /  June 23, 2017

          Eh ?

          Agatha Christie dedicated one of her books to her dog 🙂

          Reply
          • Gezza

             /  June 23, 2017

            Our mother was a school-teacher. She told us all never to say “eh?” because it was rough, & rude.

            She said we should always say, “I beg your pardon?” or “Excuse me?”
            I remember getting a clip round the ear for instantly saying back: “eh?”

            Reply
            • Gezza

               /  June 23, 2017

              She was also very clear on numerous occasions that she wasn’t raising her boys to be “louts!”.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  June 23, 2017

              You haven’t changed a bit, Sir Gerald.

            • Gezza

               /  June 23, 2017

              Like Mr & Mrs Bardon, around the corner !

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  June 23, 2017

              That’s too obscure for me, G. A neighbour?

            • Gezza

               /  June 23, 2017

              Absolutely, Sir Alan. We were left on no doubt that Bomb Bardon was a “lout”, who wore black jeans, & that his two younger brothers were well on the way to graduating as louts themselves. They said “eh?”, for a start. And then there were the motor scooters…

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  June 23, 2017

              Oh, I see it was a continuation of your previous comment. Don’t knock motor scooters. I had one for a long time before finances allowed a car (actually I married one still as an impoverished student). I didn’t say “eh?” though.

            • Gezza

               /  June 23, 2017

              You married a motor scooter whilst still an impoverished student, Sir Alan ??

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  June 23, 2017

              No, I married a (relatively) affluent training college student and ex-nurse who had actually got paid something and owned a little Morris Minor. But actually for many years I mostly rode a motor bike to work in Christchurch.

            • Gezza

               /  June 23, 2017

              Thank goodness for that. Thanks for the clarification. I was about to suggest you book an appointment for a consultation.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  June 23, 2017

              Were you going to prescribe another uptick?

            • Gezza

               /  June 23, 2017

              No. Too early for that. Just an initial consultation at this stage.
              For an exorbitant fee.

              Was going tto ask to see the wedding photos.

              Not sure what a preliminary diagnosis might have been yet. Probably wouldn’t have involved any member of the genus mustela erminea, but a Great White was definitely on the cards.

        • Kitty Catkin

           /  June 23, 2017

          My dog has a university named after him.

          Reply
          • Kitty Catkin

             /  June 23, 2017

            My mother was a schoolmistress, too, and disliked ‘eh ?’

            But ‘I beg your pardon.’ was considered non-U , so we never said that unless we were begging someone’s pardon. Ditto ‘excuse me.’

            I remember reading in the paper that some young lout was making a pest of himself outside a shop-knocking things over, that sort of thing. The shopkeeper told him to stop it. He didn’t. The shopkeeper asked if he wanted a clip round the ear.

            The lout said ‘Yes.’….and was given one.

            Mummy tried to do the shopkeeper for assault when she heard. Mine would have had no sympathy for my brother if this had been him. ‘Serve you damned well right !’ would have been the probable reaction ..

            Reply
            • Gezza

               /  June 23, 2017

              The universal acclamation from mums n dads during my teen years as well, Kitty. And dad would’ve made us go back there, with him, & apologise.

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  June 23, 2017

              (snorts with mirth) My mother would have, too, after telling him what she thought of his actions and how little sympathy she had.

              That’s assuming that he would have been fool enough to come running home to tell the tale. This was a youth, not a child.

              What a wally, running whining to mummy. My brother and his friends would have chalked it up to experience and kept quiet about it.

              He and a friend were caught throwing stones at cars when they were well old enough to know how stupid this was. Alas, one driver was young and a fast runner. My brother was the one caught and marched home with his ear firmly held in a large, strong hand. The friend who escaped had to come back to our place eventually and sheepishly-we lived in Wanganui and he lived in Palmerston North.

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  June 23, 2017

              I think that most parents even now would feel as ours did-it only made the paper because of mummy’s reaction. There was little sympathy expressed, as I remember.

  2. Alan Wilkinson

     /  June 22, 2017

    An Irishman should know the shortest day is different on the other side of the world because they are a day behind. That’s proper Irish logic.

    Reply
  3. Trumpenreich

     /  June 22, 2017

    Another excellent example of feminist celebrities hypocritically complaining about “sexual objectification:

    https://out.reddit.com/t3_6inxgr?url=https%3A%2F%2Fi.imgur.com%2FXnVgPJA.png&token=AQAAli5LWRwa8NCUuSw_USODwDKKj3QtnWd_NbAvsZ9ItXlhpTic&app_name=reddit.com

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  June 22, 2017

      Groan, groan. Yes, I am sure that she was coerced into lying with her all but naked bum in the air. Or we all know that women are too stupid and vulnerable to stop themselves being seen as sex objects. It’s also expressing one’s sexuality…until some man looks and goes ‘phwoarrrr !!!!’

      If you don’t want to be seen as a sex object, don’t prance around looking like one. QED.

      Reply
      • patupaiarehe

         /  June 22, 2017

        Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  June 23, 2017

          Did you know that the original of that was a women’s pair of togs ? Equal opportunity unflattering, needless to say :-/

          That is more indecent than any nudity could ever be-blechhhhhhh !!!!!

          Reply
  4. Zedd

     /  June 22, 2017

    It seems that we could have a referendum on cannabis reform coming.. IF you support only the status quo, then vote Natz
    If you support other ideas:

    Lab. med-use focus
    Grn legalise/regulate all use
    NZ1st binding referendum
    ACT ‘would legalise tommorow’ sez Mr S
    UF blow with wind
    TOP end prohibition & regulate
    ALCP legalise cannabis

    BUT it seems that team-natz are standing alone now on this (even med-use, only big-pharm)? or synthetic ??

    Reply
    • PDB

       /  June 22, 2017

      If you ‘only vote on a single issue’ that would be useful – most people however look across a range of issues, of which this is but one.

      Reply
      • true.. maybe something that could ‘lively up’ the ‘missing million’ though

        Reply
  5. Gezza

     /  June 22, 2017

    Bloody great floa’a inna wotsit a’ va Restome taday.
    Orribull, it were.
    Block’igiz.
    Orribull.

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  June 23, 2017

      Telly’s out. Must be something wrong with the network.

      *Nancy passed away last night. Ma & I have spent many hours talking with her husband up at the Rest Home over the past 8 months. A “lovely” (everybody said), elderly 6 foot 2 guy who sat next to his wife in the lounge for 2 -3 hours every day – holding her hand, or casually stroking her white, wispy hair with his, while she looked gently back at him with wide open eyes & a soft & gentle expression. When she wasn’t asleep.

      Nancy had advanced dementia & all she could do was lie or sit in her armchair during the day & occasionally smile at him or us, & from time to time, maybe, manage a brief few-word acknowledgement of something we had said. She never knew our names. She could no longer even remember or say his.

      Hubby has picked ma up every visiting day of hers for the last 6 months & they have been able to talk about the inevitability of this day for their spouses, & how they are now looking forward to it because the person they knew & still love is no longer there.

      Nancy had a fall & broke her hip & arm a week ago. An emergency hip replacement was done but the stress on her system was too much & she faded quickly. Her husband rang ma to tell us the news this morning. We will miss them so much.

      Reply
      • Missy

         /  June 23, 2017

        that’s sad G, she sounds like she was such a lovely lady.

        I understand the sentiment of looking forward to the day that their loved one passes on. To many it sounds heartless, but it is so hard to see someone you know and love disappear before your very eyes through this disease. It is an incredibly hard thing to watch, and to deal with. It is heartbreaking when it gets to the point they don’t recognise you.

        I know I haven’t said much, but I am thinking of you and your family with your dad’s illness, and I know how hard it must be for you all.

        The above is clumsily said I know, but I know you will understand the sentiment behind it.

        🌹❤️

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  June 23, 2017

          There’s nothing clumsy about that at all, Missy.
          You get it. And thank you.
          🌹🌹🌹 🌹🌹🌹

          Reply
          • Missy

             /  June 23, 2017

            You are welcome. I have been there (sort of), and have a bit of an understanding of what you could all be going through.

            My Grandfather had dementia when I was a kid, and I remember what it was like very well, and I remember being so relieved when he died, which of course made me feel so guilty.

            So I understand, it is a difficult time for you all, and the emotions will be all over the place. Take care, and cherish the support of the whanau and friends. ❤️

            Reply
          • Missy

             /  June 24, 2017

            What nasty, uncaring individuals would downtick this comment.

            Whoever you are you ought to be ashamed, it shows a lack of compassion for a sensitive conversation, and contempt for what other people are going through.

            Whoever you are, grow up and show some compassion and empathy.

            G – to make up for the sad, and nasty individual(s) who downticked this comment, have this rose. 🌹

            Reply

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