Open Forum – Saturday

24 June 2017

Facebook: NZ politics/media+

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29 Comments

  1. Missy

     /  June 24, 2017

    I have been reflecting on one of the less ego boosting things about getting older… buying alcohol – or more specifically no longer being id’d when buying alcohol.

    I figure there are three stages in adulthood when it come to buying alcohol.

    1. young, newly of age, insulted everytime you get id’d
    2. at an age when comfortable with finally being an adult and the responsibilities, and finally happy not to be id’d everytime you buy alcohol.
    3. slightly older, still comfortable about who you are, but starting to realise you are getting older, (i.e.: a few wrinkles, a grey hair maybe – not me yet! not clubbing every weekend, no longer worried about ‘hooking up’ etc), and now being insulted because you are no longer id’d when buying alcohol!

    I will admit, normally it doesn’t bother me, but when a young whipper snapper today in the supermarket remarked ‘definitely over 18’ when I was buying wine I was a little put out. When did I stop looking under 18? (I did right up until my late 20’s). *sigh*

    Anyway had to go home and crack open my (overpriced) bottle of NZ Sav to soothe my (slightly) bruised ego…..

    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  June 24, 2017

      Get used to it, Missy. Hopefully you’ll spend a long time being older than 29. The alternative is worse.

    • You’re lucky its only happen recently….. I only ever go asked for Id once – when I was 17…..looked older than I was. Thankfully have grown into the “aged” look and now people think I’m younger than I am : ) Only one thing to do – accept it. And as AL says the alternative is not that appealing really

      • Missy

         /  June 24, 2017

        I know, it is a sad day. To be honest it has been happening for years, today was just the first time the server had been so blatant about me looking so ‘obviously over 18’.

        I used to get asked for id a lot, mainly because I have always looked younger than I am (something about being short I think), and usually it doesn’t worry me that I am not asked for id, maybe I am getting old and I just wish someone thought I was young again….

        The trials of life.

        #firstworldproblems

        • You’re are as young as you feel and act Missy…. just think of the benefits of not being 23 anymore – wisdom, experience, knowing what you want and like, maturing out of left wing idealist fantasies… The only downside is the old sports injuries playing up I reckon : )

          • Missy

             /  June 24, 2017

            Indeed dave.

            I still have a way to go for wisdom, I believe that is something that you don’t really get until the end of life, but definitely up with the rest of it all. 🙂

            I soon matured out of my left wing fantasies when I left Uni, even with all the no interest on student loans bribes from labour. 🙂

            Got a few of those old sports injuries dave, netball played havoc with the knees.

            • Blazer

               /  June 24, 2017

              interesting topics maturity and wisdom,very elastic too and impossible to….define them in any general terms.

        • Gezza

           /  June 24, 2017

          The most attractive women in the world. Those who’ve got a grey hair & a wrinkle or two. They’re the ones who silently wonder if they’re still desirable, but have more important things to worry about.They’re the ones whose eyes shine the brightest with the light of knowing who and what are most important to care about. And knowing whether you’re a bloke worth knowing, for them. They’re the ones who have no idea they are so together they always look desirable, whatever they look like.

  2. Blazer

     /  June 24, 2017

    Quite frankly I am amazed a person with Missy’s absolute right wing viewpoints is so…young.What happened to ‘If You Are Not a Liberal at 25, You Have No Heart. If You Are Not a Conservative at 35 You Have No Brain’…..perhaps she will have an epiphany in her…dowager, stage of life.

    • Missy

       /  June 24, 2017

      I have a long way until I reach my dowager years Blazer, so I will just happily live without a your type of an epiphany thanks.

  3. sorethumb

     /  June 24, 2017

    Explaining Post Modernism
    http://www.stephenhicks.org/wp-content/uploads/2009/10/hicks-ep-full.pdf
    I’m reading my way through this. As I get through the chapters my blood starts to boil because you see there is a plot to it all, and it is being done over the heads of the average person.

  4. lurcher1948

     /  June 24, 2017

    http://www.kiwiblog.co.nz/2017/06/a_vile_professor.html
    Get over it David Farrar.the idiot

    was a thief

  5. lurcher1948

     /  June 24, 2017

    Hi Alan Wilkinson ,what idiot goes there to NK and then steals,who cares dead in a year WHO CARES….just saying

    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  June 24, 2017

      Probably quite a few people including his family but obviously not you, Lurch.

  6. Conspiratoor

     /  June 24, 2017

    Imperator Fish, our most cerebral blogger, opens a door to wealth through sacrifice. Well worth a read for young folks on the lowest rung and in despair…

    “I bought my first house when I was 23 and now I own four. Here’s how I did it

    Hi there. I’m an Aucklander. I bought my first house when I was just 23 years old. I turned 30 last month, and I already own four Auckland properties.

    So how did I do it? Let me tell you.

    But first, a warning. This is a story about sacrifice. About setting goals and working hard. Some people have it easy, but not me. There was no inheritance, no rich parents ready to help with a deposit or to stand as guarantors. I got where I am today after a lot of hard work and effort. And yes, it was tough at times. But you know what? If something you want comes too easily then you probably didn’t really deserve it.

    If that doesn’t sound like your deal, and you’re looking for an easy solution, you may as well stop reading this right now…”

    https://imperatorfish.com/2017/03/31/i-bought-my-first-house-when-i-was-23-and-now-i-own-four-heres-how-i-did-it/

    • Gezza

       /  June 24, 2017

      Definitely worth a read through. How to do it right, stage by stage, to get a property & onto the property ladder, & the ultimate key to his fantastic success is right at the end.

      • Conspiratoor

         /  June 24, 2017

        Exacury G, in a crazy crazy world, humour can still be used to convey a serious message. If anyone needs help deciphering the message I’m here to help. Cheers,c

        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  June 24, 2017

          Sorry, the message was?

        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  June 24, 2017

          Seems I’ll have to guess. Lefty corporate lawyer thinks Bob Jones got rich by selling P rather than investing in property? Tells silly story to prove it.

          • Gezza

             /  June 25, 2017

            No, the message is – while the debate rages about the rocketing price of housing, the poor saving habits & general fecklessness of coffee & wine-sipping young people today, who want a luvly house for mo effort only in the best suburbs, & who aren’t prepared to work hard & make the belt-tightening sacrifices that we did to get a deposit & a mortgage – a young chap of good character, good will, & good sense does all the right things to earn & put together a deposit & pursue the kiwi dream of purchasing his own home – but an accumulation of quite normal setbacks & misfortunes of life for many, many people today simply wipes out all the fruits of his best intentions, sacrifices, hard work & finances, and he is left where he started, with nothing.

            However he remains steadfast in his determination to suceed in getting on to the property & wealth ladder & decides to start all over sgain. Only, this time he is mindful of the bitter lessons of his life to date, & determination, looking after number 1, & thinking smarter, are now only virtues he sees as worth having. So he makes his fortune quickly, with much less effort, applying those fewer values more stringently, in quite a different manner.

            And while the debate I spoke of earlier is still continuing, that is actually happening, in Auckland & elsewhere, all over our fair land. Underneath the hubub of life, argument, infotainment & other distraction which absorb our interest. One of c’s daughters may even have inside info, experience of dealing with the impacts of this thriving business, & skin in the sometimes dangerous game of trying to put an end to it?

            And the message is – what can we do to stop it happening?

            • Gezza

               /  June 25, 2017

              Grr. Small screen FiP!
              * line 4 – ‘mo effort’ = no effort.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  June 25, 2017

              Silly story. Load of rubbish. Those who exploit P are mostly destroyed by it. Those who try hard and have bad luck mostly try again and succeed. Those who are stupid, stay stupid,

            • Gezza

               /  June 25, 2017

              Ah Shaddupayouface!

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  June 25, 2017

              .. as I was saying. Few who succeed have not had failures and learnt from them.

            • Gezza

               /  June 25, 2017

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  June 25, 2017

              Sorry to hear that, G. Or perhaps not. Was it a good job?

  7. lurcher1948

     /  June 24, 2017

    Good win all blacks sir JK had depression on his voice when interviewed, we are here to give you a cuddle sir John Kirwin,

    • Missy

       /  June 25, 2017

      What a contemptible comment Lurcher, not to mention insensitive when considering Sir John Kirwan’s history, and ongoing battles, with depression.

      Grow up and show some thought when commenting.