Media watch – Friday

14 July 2017

MediaWatch

Media Watch is a focus on New Zealand media, blogs and social media. You can post any items of interested related to media.

A primary aim here is to hold media to account in the political arena. A credible and questioning media is an essential part of a healthy democracy.

A general guideline – post opinion on or excerpts from and links to blog posts or comments of interest, whether they are praise, criticism, pointing out issues or sharing useful information.

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17 Comments

  1. Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  July 14, 2017

      I take it Emmerson is not saying our debt is going to melt away like an iceberg? So his point is confused to say the least – unlike his usual malevolence.

      Reply
  2. unitedtribes2

     /  July 14, 2017

    Trump Junior
    So his crime is, as a politician he dug up shit on the opposition, unearthed by politician’s digging up shit on the opposition.
    https://consortiumnews.com/2017/07/10/forgetting-the-dirty-dossier-on-trump/

    Reply
  3. Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  July 14, 2017

      Why is it wrong to discourage breeding more kids with problems?

      Reply
  4. sorethumb

     /  July 14, 2017

    Everyone on Newshub breathlessly supportive of immigration.
    Why don’t they have their own NZ and fill it up – it can be like Ranganui Walker’s “Just like anywhere else”. Are they saying what the advertisers want to hear?
    http://imgbox.com/hPbuHrAE
    RNZ’s business reporter is another one: Gareth Keirnan: “our skilled migrant program is highly regarded internationally” is not an argument from someone who ought to know it is crap.
    https://croakingcassandra.com/2015/08/18/skills-based-immigration-who-has-got-essential-skills-work-visas/

    Reply
    • I believe absolutely that the majority of immigrants are highly resourced and or skilled

      Reply
      • sorethumb

         /  July 14, 2017

        The Australian Productivity Commission found there is little or no benefit to Australians from immigration: it had all been captured by the migrants.
        NZ Productivity Commission shied away from the topic. The truth hurts the establishment.

        Reply
        • Mefrostate

           /  July 14, 2017

          Treasury tackled immigration here: http://www.treasury.govt.nz/publications/research-policy/wp/2014/14-10/twp14-10.pdf

          “while past immigration has, at times, had significant net benefits, over the past couple of decades the positive effects of immigration on per capita growth, productivity, fiscal balance and mitigating population ageing are likely to have been modest. There is also some evidence that immigration, together with other forms of population growth, has exacerbated pressures on New Zealand’s insufficiently-responsive housing market. Meeting the infrastructure needs of immigrants in an economy with a quite modest rate of national saving may also have diverted resources from productive tradable activities, with negative macroeconomic impacts. Therefore from a macroeconomic perspective, a least regrets approach suggests that immigration policy should be more closely tailored to the economy’s ability to adjust to population increase. At a minimum, this emphasises the importance of improving the economy’s ability to respond to population increase. If this cannot be achieved, there may be merit in considering a reduced immigration target as a tool for easing macroeconomic pressures”

          Reply
          • Alan Wilkinson

             /  July 14, 2017

            May is a weasel word. That article is full of it.

            Reply
            • Mefrostate

               /  July 14, 2017

              Critical analysis requires the ability to identify an author’s unstated biases.

              Someone with an agenda can often be spotted overstating the evidence for their claims.

              Dispassionate research will be honest about the strength of supporting evidence and will use words like “may” when certainty cannot be attained (in economics this is often).

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  July 14, 2017

              I don’t call that research. It’s nothing more than speculation.

  5. sorethumb

     /  July 14, 2017

    Institute for Governance and Policy Studies Victoria University
    Who are the most and least trusted groups?
    Medical practitioners and Police are the most trusted groups with 56% and 53% of New Zealanders respectively trusting them lots or completely. Bloggers are the least trusted with only 5% saying they trust them lots or completely, and MPs and the media are not far behind at 8% each.
    ………..
    Hows about an app that gets around their no comments policy?
    Program choice > selection of comments> choose > result.

    Reply
  6. Mefrostate

     /  July 14, 2017

    ACT’s Beth Houlbrooke defended well her comments on Labour’s baby bonus scheme this morning:
    http://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/morningreport/audio/201851056/should-only-people-who-can-afford-children-have-them

    Far better explanation of her position than the dogwhistle post the other day.

    Reply
    • sorethumb

       /  July 14, 2017

      I can see both sides of that debate. We are very un-Singapore. Where is a Lew Kuan Yew? I’m not saying the geographically positioned trading nexus is the same country as our far flung NZ but we have *had* labour and their welfares (and ferals) – which emanated from our universities.

      Reply
      • Mefrostate

         /  July 14, 2017

        Singapore is perhaps not a great comparion, because their low fertility has caused the government to absolutely pour resources into encouraging couples to have more children: Baby Bonus, matched savings in the Child Development Account, CPF Housing Top-Up for couples, funding for IVF & intra-uterine insemination, Grandparent Caregiver Tax-Relief, and the Foreign Domestic Worker Levy Concession to make nannies cheaper.

        But, worth noting that these programs have both helped ensure that children are cared for, while preventing the sort of inter-generational dependency that we can all agree is harmful.

        Reply
  7. sorethumb

     /  July 14, 2017

    Low IQ people shouldn’t breed (unfortunately) – Shock -Horror!
    You can’t say that but it is true. If we could bang more ram in people we would (myself included). Having said that being intelligent and being wise are not necessarily related.

    Reply

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