NZ teen suicide problem on Al Jazeera

Gezza has brought this to my attention – New Zealand’s terrible teen suicide rate has featured with a discussion on Al Jazeera: Why are so many teens in New Zealand killing themselves?

Mariah Herbert is 20 years old and lives in Northland, New Zealand. A decade ago, she lost her older sister to suicide, and last year a friend for the same reason. She has tried to end her life at least twice, and has a younger sister who has also contemplated taking hers. But her story is not unique.

According to a recent UNICEF report, New Zealand has the highest youth suicide rate in the developed world for teenagers aged 15-19 years old. The rate is 15.6 suicides per 1000 people, which is twice as high as the United States and five times that of the Britain – numbers that have been largely steady for about two decades.

The country has a complicated relationship with the word “suicide”. For the past few decades, schools have been advised not use it, or discuss it in the open. The media has been under gag order for fear of contagion. And laws around it are complex. Recently, though, it has come out of the shadows in the form of prevention and awareness initiatives.

Experts have been looking into the many reasons youth suicide is a such a huge problem. School bullying records are poor, there are high rates of family violence and child abuse. Potentially, there are also cultural reasons – Maori/Pacific Islanders are particularly affected. Others say the issue is simply one of teen confidence and low self-esteem that is being mislabeled and poorly handled due to stigma. And suicide has become political. The government is working on a strategy for suicide prevention and spending millions on initiatives.

On the next Stream, we’ll take a closer look at what’s behind the high youth suicide rate in New Zealand, and discuss potential solutions to solving the problem.

Joining us on this episode of The Stream:

Mike King @themikeking
Mental health advocate
keytolife.org.nz

Mariah TeRiaki-Herbert
Suicide awareness advocate

Shaun Robinson
Chief Executive, Mental Health Foundation
mentalhealth.org.nz

David Clark @davidclarkNZ
Opposition spokesperson for Health, Labour Party
davidclark.org.nz

A lot is now being talked about teen suicides, both in New Zealand and now in international media. It’s a difficult and complex problem that needs urgent attention.

But what can be done about it?

85 Comments

  1. Gezza

     /  July 14, 2017

    Pete emailed & said he posted on it – that I could add my own comments.

    I’m just gonna paste what I said in my email:

    “At 2am this morning, this suddenly came on on Al Jazeera tv, just as I was hitting the sack.

    There’s text below the video. What? Our people can only have a sensible 30 minute discussion about this major New Zealand problem on an overseas tv channel, FFS?

    WTF is wrong?? With our media? With our bureaucracy? With our government? We have to talk about it OVERSEAS??”

    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  July 14, 2017

      To be fair the Herald made it an issue recently here. And we’ve had our own discussion following that.

      • Gezza

         /  July 14, 2017

        Who’s going to suddenly decide to kill themselves & then stop because they read the bloody Herald? Those people in that video link get it! Mike King’s gets a bit murky at one point but at another he nails it! For some anyway. He nails what our culture is & what it does to some kids!

        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  July 14, 2017

          You almost made me watch a video.

          • Gezza

             /  July 14, 2017

            I think you’ll spot it. Not like those pansies who just downticked me.

            • Brown

               /  July 14, 2017

              There you go, name calling already. That won’t hep anyone. My step daughter would be ranting at you about now (and I mean frothing at the mouth ranting) because its sexist, racist or homophobic (or something) because you used the word pansies in a way that would offend her. There’s thousands like her out there – be afraid.

            • Gezza

               /  July 14, 2017

              I didn’t name call. I told you you had no idea what you are talking about.
              Get your step daughter to watch that video. Then get her to get someone else to post here – not you – what she thought of it here anonymously.

        • Brown

           /  July 14, 2017

          Mike King became disillusioned with the bureaucracy early on so don’t go looking to the academics for answers. The key point is, in my view, we are seeing kids who are unable to cope with the real world because they live in a virtual world where nothing bad ever happens and everyone is just, like, so important to everyone else and they are, like, all so connected, like. Part of the issue is welfare, part is the dismissing of fathers as irrelevant, part is the state knowing best, part is dismissing of morals as cute but so old fashioned and part the rush toward post modernism. This has been social policy for years and as we go further liberal it will only get worse.

          • Gezza

             /  July 14, 2017

            And you totally miss it. And you totally would.

            • Brown

               /  July 14, 2017

              Maybe, maybe not. Time will tell. I hope you are right but suspect you are not.

            • Gezza

               /  July 14, 2017

              Powers been out for 2 hours. 10,000 powerco connections out in Central & Lower North Island. Just come back on in North Welly.

              I’ll bet you even money I could help your stepdaughter grab onto real life & be happy far better & faster than you ever could.

            • Pete Kane

               /  July 14, 2017

              Hope the power gigs not heading to Kelburn G. Don’t understand this Power Co thing? Just off to Karori for a blood test, so will sight the ‘carnage’.

  2. I’m never going to cover for anything that negates suicide rates in NZ. I’ve been touched by it sadly.

    However, NZ government and agencies are far more able to work towards answers. Also we’re not fudging figures and our coronial stats won’t be influenced by religious imperatives and guidelines like much of the Middle East. That we’re now promoting what a Qatari news agency says seems a little strange, considering the fact ME suicide figures appear negligible in. All stats. The Qatari/ Al-Jaz interest in us seems a tad out of kilter . It’s about time they offered some explanation of the human rights abuses and suicides of ex-pats in their their own country.

    “Qatar government admits almost 1,000 fatalities among migrants – Report calls for changes to kafala system that ties workers to their employers, among other reforms.

    The report by the international law firm DLA Piper calls for changes to the much-criticised kafala system that ties workers to their employers. It also contains the Qatari government’s own figure on the numbers of migrants who have died on its soil: 964 from Nepal, India and Bangladesh in 2012 and 2013. In all, 246 died from “sudden cardiac death” in 2012, the report said, 35 died in falls and 28 committed suicide. The number of deaths resulting from work-related injuries was low.

    But the real purpose of the 135-page report, commissioned in the wake of Guardian revelations about appalling working conditions in Qatar, was to make recommendations for reform. The document was welcomed by human rights campaigners as a major step forward, particularly given early fears that DLA Piper’s independence could be compromised by its work for Qatar-owned news network al-Jazeera.” ( note last sentence)

    But they also warned that its recommendations must be followed by action to a clear timetable and were disheartened that little reference was made to the report in Wednesday’s announcement.”

    This report is food for thought

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/may/14/qatar-admits-deaths-in-migrant-workers

  3. Kevin

     /  July 14, 2017

    Drugs. And no, I’m not being flippant.

    • interestingly, suicide rates in 20-25 year old males drops in a mild statistical link in US States with MedCan Dispensaries, seems sad young blokes are more likely to make a noose after a bottle of Jack Daniels than a spliff. Drugs is a symptom, not the cause, saw an article recently saying the worst thing for mental health is “adverse childhood experiences”.

      • PDB

         /  July 14, 2017

        Alcohol isn’t the main cause either – just a crutch.

  4. Zedd

     /  July 14, 2017

    I watched ‘The Stream’ (Al Jz) last evening; the media talkshow, this info. is from

    It sounds like ‘NZs dirty little secret’ that is being totally covered up, but has now been splashed on the world news !

    Mike King said that ‘Schools are instructed, to avoid the issue & not discuss it, even though the students are all aware of it’

    They also had Ms Genter from the Greens (on a video post) saying this Govt. are not doing enough. It is being ‘brushed under the carpet’ & funds to public health (regardless of Natz B-S) are being cut back.. time for an open. honest debate to resolve it

    I hear Kevin comment; ‘DRUGS’ but its not that this is the cause, but that they are likely being over used by people who already have developed mental problems : amongst HIGHEST rates for both issues, in world !!

    Maybe it will NOW be looked at more seriously ?

    • It’s not being covered up at all. Just google this.

      nz youth suicide

      No being dealt with is the issue

      • Zedd

         /  July 14, 2017

        obviously you did not watch the program ?

        Dr Clark said the ‘She’ll be right’ attitude has created a ‘lonely man’ syndrome, where mental problems are not addressed & are often being ‘bottled up’ & not discussed by most kiwis. It maybe available on some obscure website.. BUT its not in the mainstream

    • What are the Greens doing specifically? Are they at the coal face? If they spent a fraction of the time they spend politicking in opposition in constructive cognitive community based welfare I’d respect them.

      • Zedd

         /  July 14, 2017

        @trav

        as I said before.. keep voting Natz & everything will be just fine (NOT)
        they have just created a fantasy-land scenario, where ALL kiwis are apparently doing just fine & theres ‘nothing to see here !’
        “DREAM ON” 😦

        Homelessness & unemployment rising & Health, education costs are being cute, so they can give tax-cuts to their rich mates, who voted for them !
        “Welcome to the REAL NZ folks”

        • Zedd

           /  July 14, 2017

          typo; s/be ‘costs are being CUT..’ (not cute)

        • PDB

           /  July 14, 2017

          Only a loser would try to blame this serious issue on a particular political party – congratulations!

          • Zedd

             /  July 14, 2017

            @pdb

            your twisted it AGAIN, I’m not blaming anyone.. just pointing out that Natz have not addressed it & have actually avoided it.. 9 long years

            • The Greens zedd, after decades of MMP cannot even work their way into government. They’re impotent and becoming more irrelevant as time goes on. Reality is they do nothing about teen suicide and their spineless, airy-fairy political idealism means they never will.

  5. Alan Wilkinson

     /  July 14, 2017

    Finally got time to watch the video. I can see why G says Mike King nailed it. Not so much not talking about suicide as not talking about normal emotions and insecurities.

    • Gezza

       /  July 14, 2017

      Made worse for some kids by the long-standing underlying culture here, & the wrong type of parent, & others, who actively continually undo any work done to bring the kids to a sense of self-worth & value.

      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  July 14, 2017

        Absolutely. And probably schools that promote excellence without an understanding of the need to handle failures and deviations along the way.

        • Gezza

           /  July 14, 2017

          You can help those kids who need to build confidence & self-esteem, Alan. I reckon you probably can. But no two people are alike. There is no other you. Your kids sound well-balanced, well grounded, you & your Mrs gave them values, guidance, sanctions, rewards, all appropriate. Daughter gave you the “what the hell?” as a teen but turned out great. But they’re not you. They have their own individual complex personalities but you can read them.

          The ones who don’t just need self esteem building, sanctions etc – the ones who out of the blue just suddenly kill themselves. They’re different. They look like all the others. Hell they’re often the brightest & smartest. They often have caring parents or at least one. They sometimes do all the ‘right’ things for the kid. And then the kid goes & does that! They need different handling. Not mollycoddling, but they need different handling. They’re hard to spot. You have to observe a lot of their work & behaviour. But I can spot them.

        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  July 14, 2017

          Where have you been doing that, G, and what do you do wen you have spotted them?

          • Gezza

             /  July 14, 2017

            I tell the parents.

            • Gezza

               /  July 14, 2017

              It’s why Mike King is so utterly frustrated. He can spot them. The ones to observe closely & focus on. The high risk ones. GP’s miss them. Teachers miss them. To know how to spot these ones you talk to Mike King, not John Kirwan.

            • Gezza

               /  July 14, 2017

              I’ll correct that Al. I can spot the boys. And I tell the mothers.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  July 14, 2017

              Where do you spot them, G?

            • Gezza

               /  July 14, 2017

              Friends. Family. Neighbourhood kids if I get to know them. I like kids Al. I talk to them. I’ve talked to survivors as young adults. They talk to me. There are common characteristics. I’m talking to one family member at the moment. 4 kids. Husband died a few months ago. One of the boys really worries her. And nobody’s looking after her.

            • MaureenW

               /  July 14, 2017

              How do you spot the boys G? Are these any boys, or boys who have had a severe knock of some type (emotional)

            • Gezza

               /  July 14, 2017

              There’s several things Maureen. They’re bright. They get praised. They get frustrated easily. They know the gold star they got for their project is worthless. They know it was shit. They know Johny’s was brilliant. They’re talented. But its not in something they really want. They can’t figure out why Johny can do that & they can’t. They’re complicated. They have little obsessions they never talk about – not to dad, and not even to mum. There’s a lot of stuff. It’s fixable, but it takes time. I reckon you can spot them early. When they hit their teens & the hormones kick in & they get moody & all the usual stuff you don’t notice how intense all that stuff going on in their heads gets.

          • Alan Wilkinson

             /  July 14, 2017

            Tough, G, on them all. Lucky she has you. Sometimes a good friend/relative is all it takes.

            • Gezza

               /  July 14, 2017

              She’s a lot like me. Tougher though. So’s he by the sound of it. Everybody’s done the funeral & gone.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  July 14, 2017

              We used to play a “game” with our kids where everyone would get to say the three worst things about everyone else followed by the three best things. Cleared a lot of air. It also dispelled the notion anyone was perfect or had to be.

            • Gezza

               /  July 14, 2017

              I reckon that’s good strategy Alan. They’re always perfectionists. If they get 90% they screwed up somewhere.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  July 14, 2017

              Yes, it works. Things can be really testy and fraught and it usually finishes with everyone laughing together.

            • Gezza

               /  July 14, 2017

              If they get 50% they’ll want to abandon that.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  July 14, 2017

              I can relate to that, G. Had a schoolmate who had a row with the teacher because he only got 96%.

            • Gezza

               /  July 14, 2017

              I got 92% in maths once, in std 4. Sister Annette, the Principal, a stern crone in a black habit with Blue piping suddenly says when she’s finished marking the end of year exam papers “Gezza B, what do you think you got in maths?”. Oh shit, I thought. Numbers never dance for me. Um, 50%’ sister? More than that. Um, 60%’ sister? More than that. 70%? More than that. (This is nuts, Has she got the wrong paper?) 80%?. More than that! (She’s gotta be talking about the wrong paper…) 90%, sister? A bit more than that. 95%?. “Not quite. You got 92%. Well done – you came first in class in maths!” (Why didn’t I get 95%!)

              And that was a bloody oncer! I still think she had the wrong paper! 😀

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  July 14, 2017

              Don’t knock it, G. Wear it with pride. EAOE

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  July 14, 2017

              Interesting. I used the WordPress notification icon reply dialog to enter that last comment and I see it doesn’t get a link under “Recent Comments” when I did that.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  July 14, 2017

              … coincidence, maybe. The link turned up now.

            • Gezza

               /  July 14, 2017

              I blame the government.

            • Conspiratoor

               /  July 14, 2017

              G, i submit for your viewing pleasure one of the most beautiful yet provocative equations known to man

              1 = 0.999999999….

              This simple equation, which states that the quantity 0.999, followed by an infinite string of nines, is equivalent to one. Many people don’t believe it could be true. It’s also beautifully balanced. The left side represents the beginning of mathematics; the right side represents the mysteries of infinity. Steven strogatz

            • Gezza

               /  July 14, 2017

              That’s called rounding! 👍

  6. phantom snowflake

     /  July 14, 2017

    Here’s a possible explanation for one large group of our nation’s suicides, oversimplified to keep it brief: We physically, psychologically and sexually abuse large numbers of our children. We teach our boys that above all they must be masculine and manly, and we prohibit them from processing their trauma and abuse because this would involve dealing with feelings which we have labelled as girly or feminine. Although abused males are thus put in a near-impossible position, there is, however, an “out”. We have decreed that anger is manly and masculine. So, we shouldn’t be surprised that abused males may explode outwardly in anger (e.g. assaults and rapes) or act angrily against themselves. (self-harm or suicide) Yeah I know this isn’t the whole story. I said it was oversimplified…

    • PDB

       /  July 14, 2017

      I think you are on the wrong track – it’s more to do with today’s society disempowering males, males failing our schooling system & feeling lost and not catered for, and the father being seen as unnecessary to the family unit of which the courts/society is equally to blame as those fathers who take no responsibility for their actions.

      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  July 14, 2017

        Whatever the broad picture factors are, I would expect in individual cases it is far more personal: to do with status within the family, peers or relationships – especially relating to sexual partners as they mature.

  7. patupaiarehe

     /  July 14, 2017

    Some interesting comments above. What really needs to be examined, IMHO, is what ‘trips the switch’. Self preservation is a natural human instinct. The ‘fight or flight’ response, is evidence of this https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fight-or-flight_response
    Some people grow up in terrible circumstances, but don’t kill themselves. Some people grow up in wealthy families, and do…
    Having been on the ‘edge of a cliff’ myself, quite literally, allow me to explain the problems with the status quo.
    Society at large, regards mental illness as a sign of weakness. I would never dare admit to anyone I work with, that I take anti-depressant medication. Which is silly really, because the odds are, that at least one of them is taking them too. He most likely feels as ashamed of it as I do.
    The hardest thing I have ever had to do, was go to my GP, and ask for help. And I left it way too long, before doing so. Because I didn’t want to appear weak. The man of the house is supposed to be strong. When terrible things happen, he is supposed to be the one who keeps calm, deals with them decisively, and is unaffected by them. Well that’s what I was brought up believing, anyway.
    The reality is far different. Every time that ‘shit happens’, it affects you. And it accumulates inside you, if you don’t deal with it. Not dealing with it numbs you, and the number you get, the easier it becomes to not deal with it. Until you have so much accumulated inside you, that the numbness suddenly turns into something else…
    My GP’s reaction to being confronted by a supposedly ‘hard bugger’, who had tears streaming down his face, was to prescribe antidepressants. He said that counselling would be equally helpful, but I would have to pay for it. And with the number of dependents that I have, I couldn’t afford it. The first one had little effect, for the six months I was taking it, so I stopped taking it. And then all hell broke loose! Having never experienced a ‘panic attack’ before, I suddenly found myself with a permanent ‘lump in my throat’, anticipating that something terrible was about to happen. After going back to my GP, and getting a bit of a ‘telling off’ for not taking my medication, he told me how to ‘wean myself’ off of it. Once I was off it, he prescribed me something else. The results were nothing short of terrifying. After taking it for one day, I woke up in the middle of the night, and heard ‘voices’. Not in my head, but outside the house. There was no-one there, sensor lights don’t lie.
    So I was prescribed a third, far stronger one. And also got counseling, because by now my GP was seriously concerned. This pill was different, the first week on it, I spent wandering about feeling half stoned. Felt like I had taken one puff on a spliff, but I felt like that all day. And I yawned a lot.
    I felt a bit silly the first time I met my counselor. “Hey there stranger, I’m going to tell you my problems”, isn’t really much of a conversation starter! But there is something incredibly liberating about discussing ones issues, with someone who doesn’t know anyone you know, and who is bound to secrecy.

    • patupaiarehe

       /  July 14, 2017

      No responses, no comments… I bare my soul here (albeit anonymously), and no-one gives a fuck. Which is the problem… Ka kite… 🙂

    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  July 15, 2017

      Glad you found your solution, patu. It’s. different for everyone but talking is part of it. Three of my close family have suffered panic attacks and they are no fun. Some deal with them more easily than others. Drugs are a tool but can backfire. There are some interesting alternative therapies for trauma victims now. Have you read “The Body Keeps the Score”? Well worth it.

      • patupaiarehe

         /  July 16, 2017

        Haven’t found a solution Alan, it’s ‘a work in progress’. Haven’t read that book, but intend to now

        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  July 16, 2017

          I think you’ll find it very interesting, patu, and I hope useful. We are all a work in progress. All the best for yours. It’s not our problems that define us, but how we deal with them.

          My recipe is to be kind and hug a lot. To myself and my closest especially. There’s a lot to be said for the healing power of physical contact, even with animals.

          • patupaiarehe

             /  July 16, 2017

            I can’t fault that recipe Alan. I’m a big fan of hugs myself (but not from you, so don’t get any ideas 😉 😀 )
            Music is something that works for me. They say it’s the universal language, and I don’t think anyone could listen to the song below, and not feel uplifted by it.
            Mike King is right. If we want to fix this problem, we need to listen to the kids. But first we need to help them to talk. To be brave….

            You can be amazing
            You can turn a phrase into
            A weapon or a drug
            You can be the outcast
            Or be the backlash
            Of somebody’s lack of love
            Or you can start speaking up

            Nothing’s gonna hurt you
            The way that words do
            When they settle ‘neath your skin
            Kept on the inside
            No sunlight
            Sometimes a shadow wins
            But I wonder what would happen if you

            Say
            What you want to say
            And let the words fall out
            Honestly
            I wanna see you be brave
            With what you want to say
            And let the words fall out
            Honestly
            I wanna see you be brave

            I just wanna see you
            I just wanna see you
            I just wanna see you
            I wanna see you be brave

            Everybody’s been there
            Everybody’s been stared down
            By the enemy
            Fallen for the fear
            And done some disappearing
            Bowed down to the mighty
            Don’t run
            Stop holding your tongue

            Maybe there’s a way out
            Of the cage where you live
            Maybe one of these days
            You can let the light in
            Show me
            How big your brave is

            Say
            What you want to say
            And let the words fall out
            Honestly
            I wanna see you be brave
            With what you want to say
            And let the words fall out
            Honestly
            I wanna see you be brave

            Innocence your history of silence
            Won’t do you any good
            Did you think it would?
            Let your words be anything but empty
            Why don’t you tell them the truth?

            Say
            What you want to say
            And let the words fall out
            Honestly
            I wanna see you be brave
            With what you want to say
            And let the words fall out
            Honestly
            I wanna see you be brave

            I just wanna see you
            I just wanna see you
            I just wanna see you
            I wanna see you be brave

    • phantom snowflake

       /  July 15, 2017

      Awesome. A great example to those who are really struggling but have yet to make the great leap of seeking help, and written in a way that is easily relatable. Despite few comments, this will have been read by many, and you will never know what ripples you have sent out. Keep on keeping it real!

      • patupaiarehe

         /  July 15, 2017

        Thanks. You’re ‘picking up what I’m putting down, & why’. I only consider myself a great example, of how not to do things 😀 . I hope the ‘ripples’ spread to someone, who is where I was two years ago, right now. My message to that guy/girl, would be that you aren’t alone. What you see others posting on Facebook isn’t their normal, it’s the stage managed highlights of their life. Behind closed doors, everyone suffers from some sort of insecurity. But no-one dares to admit it publicly.
        If one person reads what I have have written, and then reconsiders what they might be about to do, I have succeeded. As have they. I look forward to hearing their story…

        • patupaiarehe

           /  July 15, 2017

          And if you are that person, who is in a really dark place, well, humour is your friend. Listen to this, & try not to laugh…

    • Pickled Possum

       /  July 15, 2017

      Patupaiarehe … tautoko … wonderfully written … I and many others have been down that pathway. Thank you for putting the words to the huarahi of sometimes depressed traumatised abused lives.

      • patupaiarehe

         /  July 15, 2017

        Thank you all for your kind remarks. While medication does have it’s place, I don’t think it should be the default option for dealing with depression. A drug that works for one person, can make another feel much worse, and the only way to find out one’s reaction, is to try it… Personally, I have found counseling far more helpful.

        • patupaiarehe

           /  July 15, 2017

          I think I need help
          I’m drowning in myself

          Did someone turn the lights out
          Or is it just another dark cloud in my head?
          ‘Cause I’m cut deep, my heart won’t beat
          Deep down low it’s killing me
          If I wanna scratch out yesterday
          I’ve got so much I need to say
          (I’ve got so much I need to say)

          I think I need help
          ‘Cause I’m drowning in myself
          It’s sinking in, I can’t pretend
          That I ain’t been through hell
          I think I need help
          I’m drowning in myself

          They’re preying on my weakness, believe it
          I’m thinking to myself “No, not again”
          And I won’t keep listening
          When temptations creeping in
          If I wanna make it another day
          I’ve got so much I need to say
          (I’ve got so much I need to say)

        • Gezza

           /  July 15, 2017

          It’s often a combination & it’s a lifetime’s work patu. Sometimes it’s the genes plus the environment. It’s important for people to know about it because you don’t know who it could happen to. But when it happens, it’s like losing your spouse, or, I imagine, a child. What happens to you can only truly be understood when you experience it directly yourself, or see it happen to someone you are extremely close to. People who go through the sort of challenges anxiety & depression conditions cause, & who come out of it ok – & go on to thrive – those people are the really strong people amongst us. Because they’ve had to start from further back than everyone else. And they make it.

          • patupaiarehe

             /  July 15, 2017

            Don’t know about you G, but those stinky thumbs are getting me a little excited. An erstwhile employer of mine once opined, “If you can annoy one person, whilst going about your normal daily business, it has been a good day”. I’m quite chuffed with my two downticks. As should you be. Give yourself a pat on the back, e hoa… 😀

          • Gezza

             /  July 15, 2017

            Righto. I did, back of the hand with the 👍.
            There’s wankers everywhere mate. I don’t mind when they let me know they’ve been here.

          • Gezza

             /  July 15, 2017

            Actually I thought about my last line above after I posted it & if I could’ve edited it, I would have. It’s not people who encounter this condition start from further back. They don’t. It’s that they suddenly find they’ve got more hurdles to get over.

            • patupaiarehe

               /  July 15, 2017

              Here’s one for the ‘stinky thumber, donkey bumber’….

  8. patupaiarehe

     /  July 16, 2017

    I never thought I’d die alone
    I laughed the loudest, who’d have known?
    I traced the cord back to the wall
    No wonder, it was never plugged in at all
    I took my time, I hurried up
    The choice was mine, I didn’t think enough
    I’m too depressed to go on
    You’ll be sorry when I’m gone

    I never conquered, rarely came
    Sixteen just held such better days
    Days when I still felt alive
    We couldn’t wait to get outside
    The world was wide, too late to try
    The tour was over, we’d survived
    I couldn’t wait till I got home
    To pass the time in my room alone

    I never thought I’d die alone
    Another six months, I’ll be unknown
    Give all my things to all my friends
    You’ll never step foot in my room again
    You’ll close it off, board it up
    Remember the time that I spilled the cup
    Of apple juice in the hall
    Please tell mom, this is not her fault

    I never conquered, rarely came
    Sixteen just held such better days
    Days when I still felt alive
    We couldn’t wait to get outside
    The world was wide, too late to try
    The tour was over, we’d survived
    I couldn’t wait till I got home
    To pass the time in my room alone

    I never conquered, rarely came
    Tomorrow holds such better days
    Days when I can still feel alive
    When I can’t wait to get outside
    The world is wide, the time goes by
    The tour is over, I’d survived
    I can’t wait till I get home
    To pass the time in my room alone

  1. NZ teen suicide problem on Al Jazeera — Your NZ – NZ Conservative Coalition