Q+A – youth not in work, training or education

One of the most contentious issues about immigration is the approximately 90,000 youths not in work, training or education, but the apparent need to get immigrants to work because employers can’t find Kiwis to fill positions.

Some politicians say we shouldn’t bring in immigrants until unemployed Kiwis have been given a chance.

But many people know from experience that a hard core of young people in particular are either unemployable, or at least not keen on getting work and are very unreliable.

Q+A looks at all this (hopefully) this morning.

Nearly 90-thousand young New Zealanders aren’t in work, training or education. Yet many of our employers are desperate for skilled staff. American social entrepreneur Jeffery Wallace may have the answers. He joins us live.

21 Comments

  1. Oliver

     /  July 23, 2017

    Let’s be honest it’s about racism. Most of those 90000 are Maori. And employers don’t want to hire Maori because of the color of their skin. These kids want to work but a disadvantaged by white prejudice NZ.

    • Gezza

       /  July 23, 2017

      Possible, I suppose. Where’s the evidence that 90,000 of them want to work, & that employers won’t hire them because of the colour if their skin, as opposed to their, say, not being literate, or qualified, enough or, trustable enough, or motivated enough to keep turning up for work?

    • You sir are a complete clown. Its not racism. Its about people not wanting to turn up. Its about families with no work ethic and no pushing their young people to get off their arse every morning to go to work or to further education or vocational skills training…..

    • PDB

       /  July 23, 2017

      I’ll give you the benefit of the doubt Oliver that you are not being serious and are instead trying to provoke a reaction – no one could be that dumb………..surely?

      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  July 23, 2017

        That’s a triumph of hope over experience if you recall Oliver’s previous contributions.

  2. Blazer

     /  July 23, 2017

    Good way of keeping wages low..and profits. .high.The taxpayers pick up the..bill.

    • Coupled with growing headline GDP by increasing the population.

    • You always speak like things are a conspiracy. It’s disconcerting thinking you might even be half serious. Every model I understand of a healthy economy regards as full employment as possible. as a priority. This government has improved our economy and our unemployment rates. It doesn’t make no social or fiscal sense to suggest otherwise.

      At under 5% we have the lowest unemployment in the OECD. Truth is anyone who is prepared to make the odd compromise and wants to work can.

      • Blazer

         /  July 23, 2017

        What models have full employment as a priority?

        • John Schmidt

           /  July 23, 2017

          Full employment is a myth.
          There is this thing called the Interweb and it has search engines llike Google. People use Google to seek answers to questions. Feel free to insert your question into Google, its much more efficient than asking others to answer your question.

  3. Brown

     /  July 23, 2017

    A mate in his mid fifties just got a job in window manufacturing after quitting his caretaker role. He is very skilled with his hands, driven everything, built stuff, maintained stuff and is smart but has no formal qualifications which counted against him in this regulated world where a piece of paper trumps ability. He got an interview via an agent and was completely up front about what he knew (nothing) but was keen to learn. He was hired on the spot. Within a couple of weeks he was promoted to something better than the basic job he was doing because he’s ethical and motivated.

    What was interesting is that the job probably arose because the boss had turned up at the factory the Saturday before to find five young workers outside smoking dope. They were sacked on the spot because they weren’t worth persevering with hence the vacancies I guess. One loser’s cloud is another man’s silver lining. Drug testing is commonplace and you have to be a dickhead to flout that fact if you want a job but thousands do. Health and safety regulations make it impractical for work places to retain people that fail testing and that’s great – consequences teach lessons.

    The waife I kicked out last year is on a job seekers benefit but being a meth addict, a thief, a liar and filthy she’s unemployable. When she gets challenged by WINZ she just spins some bullshit, attends a course or counselling and the money starts up again. Her circle of friends are generally like her and I have no doubt there are thousands of young people like her – so screwed by the consequences of being stupid and ill disciplined they are untouchables if you value your business.

  4. Tipene

     /  July 23, 2017

    “Those convinced against their will, are of the same opinion still”

    Which is one reason why the Youth Guarantees Programme went tits up, costing us half a billion dollars:

    https://www.tvnz.co.nz/one-news/new-zealand/exclusive-youth-vocational-training-scheme-failing-achieve-desired-results

    So may educational organisations offer “incentives” (read “bribes”), to get these young people into training and education (trips, finder fees to invite their mates onto a course, food, etc etc).

    If learning as a way out of poverty and dysfunction isn’t reward enough, then once the novelty of “the course” wears off, and the real work begins, the trainees just stop coming.

  5. PDB

     /  July 23, 2017

    The days of youth being willing to start at the bottom and work their way up is over for most – what with today’s mantra that youth should be paid a living, adult age from the outset regardless of experience and/or ability.

    This sense of entitlement extends into all parts of life – first time buyers want to be able to buy a large house in Mt Eden, people want to have all the latest gadgets and be propped up by the govt in order to do so, overseas trips and meals out are now seen as important when working out a ‘living wage’. The youth of today are especially hateful of the baby boomers because they feel they deserve all the benefits that group of people now enjoy without the decades of hard work/hard times many of those baby boomers went through before being well off. What is also largely ignored in NZ is that many of these ‘baby boomers’ are also on the bones of their ass with nothing but a pension to rely on.

    The Telegraph: “Those who were born into “Generation Y” have an over-inflated sense of entitlement lack the work ethic to achieve their goals.

    They also hate being criticised, it is claimed.

    Researchers believe that the problem stems from being constantly told from birth they are special and as a result now believe it – and will ignore anybody who says otherwise.
    But far from making them happy their approach to life leads to higher levels of depression and “chronic diasppointment” as unjustified levels of self-esteem masks the ugly reality.
    Academics have concluded the values drummed into their grandparents, such as a strong work ethic and self-sacrifice, have been lost in the relentless quest for self-fulfilment.”

    “Members have long complained they have been unfairly characterised as lazy but the new research appears to prove that the stereotype is actually true.”

    “A separate study due to be published in the Journal of Management showed those in Generation Y care most about high salaries and lots of leisure time – two apparently incompatible goals.

    A research team from Kennesaw State University, in Georgia, examined data from an ongoing study of high school students conducted annually since 1975 by the University of Michigan.

    Both workers in Generation X, the one which came before Generation Y, and Gen Yers want to earn a lot but the former show greater awareness a hefty salary comes through hard work.

    “They want everything,” said Stacy Campbell, an assistant professor of management at Kennesaw.
    “They want the time off. They want the big bucks. The findings really support the idea that they’re entitled.”

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/7760687/Young-adults-believe-in-the-age-of-entitlement-claim-researchers.html

    • Blazer

       /  July 23, 2017

      What…’hard times’ have baby boomers..endured?

      • PDB

         /  July 23, 2017

        Most of the 1970’s weren’t exactly a lot of fun financially, there have been times of skyrocketing mortgage interest & unemployment rates which the youth of today have never seen, nor was the 1987 stock market crash enjoyable for many – are you being deliberately obtuse?

        • Blazer

           /  July 23, 2017

          Comparative to other generations. hardly qualifies as…hardship.

          • PDB

             /  July 23, 2017

            Comparing to millennials (which is the whole point) that is hardship. That’s not even going into the lack of luxuries & technology, complexities of doing simple tasks, menial labour that youth of today don’t even think about.

      • John Schmidt

         /  July 23, 2017

        How about 23% mortgage rates, how about having to apply for ovetseas funds to fly anywhere out of NZ and being restricted in the amount on a PA basis, how about not being able to buy a new car without overseas funds, how about carless days, how about unions shutting down the country each easter and Christmas break, how about getting a beating from union officals because I wanted to work against their will, how about the restrictions on mortgage lending which meant people needed up to 4 or more mortgages to buy a house, how about having to wait months to have a phone connected, how about inter region banking restrictions limiting withdrawals to a particular branch in a particular location, how about no Internet, I could go on but I am getting tired and the list is long.

  6. chrism56

     /  July 23, 2017

    Remember cars were something that spent most of their time being dismantled and fixed and a 50 mile drive was a big trip? A 23″ colour TV was really expensive. Most houses had only 1 radio. Only needed one power point per room. A 1000 square foot house was big. No cell phones. No restaurants. I started work on $60 a week and petrol was about $3 per gallon. Return trip flight Wellington to Chch was $100. I think the rent for the shared flat was about $25 per week each plus power and phone. I had to bike to work to save money. Everyone had sliced bread sandwiches for lunch. It wasn’t hardship as that was all we knew, and we were so much luckier than our parents born in the depression and growing up during the war.
    That was what starting work as a baby boomer was like.

    • Brown

       /  July 24, 2017

      But we were happy. Life was simpler, less cluttered. I used to leave the house unlocked.

      • Gezza

         /  July 24, 2017

        Yep. Us too. Only locked it if we were all going away on holiday.