Labour’s water policy

Jacinda Ardern announced Labour’s water policy yesterday, but many details have been left undecided, in particular who will be charged how much for water.

Clean rivers for future generations

Labour will lead a nationwide effort to restore our rivers and lakes to a clean, swimmable state, says Leader of the Opposition Jacinda Ardern.

“Clean water is the birth-right of all of us. I want future generations to be able to swim in the local river, just like I did. All our children deserve to inherit swimmable lakes and rivers – and they can, if we commit ourselves as a country to cleaning up our water.

“We can do this. We can restore our rivers and lakes to a truly swimmable standard. If we choose it, and if we all work together. It will mean using our water more carefully, and being smarter about how we manage our pollution.

“Labour will help with the task of protecting our waterways from agricultural pollution. Our Ready for Work programme will employ young people off the dole and give them work improving the environment – including fencing waterways, riparian planting, and other work to improve water quality.

“A royalty on the commercial consumption of water will assist with the cost of keeping our water clean. The royalty will be flexible to reflect the scarcity or abundance of water in different regions, the different quality of water, and its use. Royalty levels will be set following consultation and the revenue will largely be returned to regional councils.

“To help set the royalty, in my first hundred days, I’ll host a roundtable on water at Parliament, with all affected sectors. I will not set a rate until I have met with those who will be affected; this is an issue that we must tackle together.

“Labour believes when water is exported for profit, private companies should also pay a royalty.

“Labour will work with iwi to resolve Treaty water claims in a manner that respects iwi’s mana, and restores the mauri of our rivers and lakes.

“Our river and lakes are a taonga of huge significance to Māori, a favourite place of recreation for New Zealanders. It’s time to restore them for future generations. Let’s do this,” says Jacinda Ardern.

David Parker said all large users of water given permits through councils would pay for water, but wouldn’t define ‘large’.

Parker wouldn’t ‘pluck a figure out of the air’, so will go into the election promising water charges but deferring to an expert panel to decide how much, after the election of course.

 

51 Comments

  1. PDB

     /  August 10, 2017

    “Our Ready for Work programme will employ young people off the dole and give them work improving the environment” – has always sounded good in theory but in reality the costs to the taxpayer always heavily outweigh the time and effort it takes to get these people doing…….well anything, especially at a time where businesses are crying out for workers already.

    “Labour will work with iwi to resolve Treaty water claims in a manner that respects iwi’s mana, and restores the mauri of our rivers and lakes” – the biggest financial can of worms Labour is going to open since they decided Maori were in a partnership with the crown. Putting a price on water means Maori will want their share of that money leading to yet more claims that tie up the courts for years to come and no doubt further treaty payouts.

    “A royalty on the commercial consumption of water will assist with the cost of keeping our water clean. The royalty will be flexible to reflect the scarcity or abundance of water in different regions, the different quality of water, and its use” – it’s a ‘tax’ and with all the exemptions (region, water quality, water scarcity, if in drought etc) that Labour is already signaling a very complex one. Good tax is always a simple tax – like GST.

    “David Parker said all large users of water given permits through councils would pay for water, but wouldn’t define ‘large’.” – a lot of businesses/farms use a lot of water and if charged for that water the consumer (us) of the products these entities provide will ultimately be the one’s paying extra, not them.

    • Kitty Catkin

       /  August 10, 2017

      It’s sad but true that work schemes often cost more than they are worth. I know this because my husband was involved with one and while some good work was done, there was a lot of absenteeism (usually on the day after dole day), equipment was damaged and lost and other hassles.

      Labour’s water policy is just a variation on soak the rich-or drain them dry, in this case.

      • Blazer

         /  August 10, 2017

        You have no understanding of the water debate.Pristine bore water should not be free to export.

        • PDB

           /  August 10, 2017

          You have no understanding of the water debate. Whether pristine bore water is free to export is almost a minor part of the debate whilst a nationwide water tax is what will affect everyday New Zealanders.

          • Blazer

             /  August 10, 2017

            you have no understanding that natural resources like water cannot be free to overseas interests.Please list the free natural resources that people profit from around the world.

            • PDB

               /  August 10, 2017

              Do you actually understand what the issue is actually about? The focus is actually on the ‘water tax’ on New Zealanders not exporting water – why are you rabbiting on about overseas interests?

            • Blazer

               /  August 10, 2017

              @PDB…you don’t appear to understand the issue more like.Just adopting the Natz spin and scaremongering.

      • PDB

         /  August 10, 2017

        Yep – expensive to run (chasing up/managing people etc) and quality tends to be rubbish – I remember in many cases native plantings and the like had to be redone by contractors so poor was the work carried out by the work scheme people.

        • Kitty Catkin

           /  August 10, 2017

          I remember the Greens squawking about the $20 a week being slave labour level, ignoring the fact that these people were getting $? on the dole, and that when that and the $20 were divided by the 20 hours that were done, it worked out to a good hourly rate.

          Poor administration & coordination were a problem, I think.

          • Blazer

             /  August 10, 2017

            whats that got to do with water?Go and have a cup of tea…green tea.

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  August 10, 2017

              Er…see Pants’ comment above mine.

              And the first one.

              Labour/Pollyardern raised the issue of work on these schemes.

  2. Blazer

     /  August 10, 2017

    Wonderful thing consultation. NZ is has a temperate climate. .perfect for horticulture in regions with plentiful rainfall. Taxpayer funded irrigation schemes in National strongholds are the antithesis of what National. .are supposed to. .stand. .for.

  3. duperez

     /  August 10, 2017

    I didn’t think Ardern would bring the water debate front and centre. It’s a biggie.

    Did John Key? And was he prepared to put the euthanasia debate right up front? Or was the biggie for him the flag design? That’s a perspective.

    • PDB

       /  August 10, 2017

      Brought it front and centre and then proceeded to not tell us how much the water tax would be, who exactly will be paying the tax, and how exactly the tax would work with all the exemptions they are already talking about.

      John Key’s major policy was partial asset sales which he signaled well before the election even though he knew it would not be universally popular.

  4. Gezza

     /  August 10, 2017

    It got a good old thrashing at Question 11 in the House today!! 😬 😀

    • Blazer

       /  August 10, 2017

      Big,bumptious ,bellicose Bennett regurgitating lines.What about consultation do they not understand.Nick Smith…600bil.hopeless.

      • PDB

         /  August 10, 2017

        Consultation? Hilarious! By not even roughly indicating what the water tax will be they have opened themselves up for conjecture.

  5. Ray

     /  August 10, 2017

    The Deputy PM really cut Parker a new one, she is very good.

    • Gezza

       /  August 10, 2017

      Pretty much the whole circus today was hilarious!

    • Blazer

       /  August 10, 2017

      good at what..exactly?Reading notes.She has many portfolios and very little grasp of any of them.

      • Kitty Catkin

         /  August 10, 2017

        Who do you think wrote the notes ?

        • Blazer

           /  August 10, 2017

          the National Party spin doctors who brief ministers on a daily basis.

          • Kitty Catkin

             /  August 10, 2017

            There’s no answer to that -well, none that you would understand.

  6. Corky

     /  August 10, 2017

    Oh, Nick!!!.

    He reminds me of George Hawkins. Hawkins in his prime was a formidable debater. However, when he became ill he lost his spark and was allowed to linger for too long.

    I doubt Nick, in his prime, was half as good as Hawkins.

    Time for Nationals Tea Lady to trundle in a empty trolley so Bill and Paula can have one last cuppa with Nick before the cold steel finds its mark.

    • Gezza

       /  August 10, 2017

      Good ol’ Nick, he’s a battler!

      I’ll bet he bloody votes!, which is more than can be said for *some people* who intend to just bludge off other people’s votes & who shall remain nameless because of the shame they bring on the family name!

      • Kitty Catkin

         /  August 10, 2017

        To shame the name with such ill-fame is a nasty game that calls for blame and gets the same.

        • Gezza

           /  August 10, 2017

          Exactly !
          😳 Wot ?

          • Kitty Catkin

             /  August 10, 2017

            If you came to tame this guy or dame, they’d soon look lame with a flickering flame.

  7. Alloytoo

     /  August 10, 2017

    Why does Labour’s water tax smell and taste like a carbon Tax?

    • Corky

       /  August 10, 2017

      Because like some on this site they are to sly for their own good.

      • Gezza

         /  August 10, 2017

        They might just need *taking down a peg or two* Corks. 😳
        Why not give it a go? 👍🏼

  8. Blazer

     /  August 10, 2017

    What resources are free around the world….please let us know.

    • High Flying Duck

       /  August 10, 2017

      Generally renewable resources found in abundance like sunshine, air and water.

      • Blazer

         /  August 10, 2017

        as you should be aware,the things you name are scarce in…many countries….btw…is Oil…a renewable resource?

      • Kitty Catkin

         /  August 10, 2017

        Sunshine, yes, air, yes, water, yes-well, one needs to buy a container to carry it in, but that is unavoidable. But anyone can stand a bucket outside and collect free water.

        Just look outside, Blazer.

        • Blazer

           /  August 10, 2017

          So you think you can pop over to a natural spring in another country,drop a bore and start pumping water to bottle and sell…gratis.How about sand …can you pop down to the beach with a bucket and help yourself..can you?

          • PDB

             /  August 10, 2017

            You are now getting silly Blazer…….looking outside like Kitty suggests may be a good idea for you, opening your other eye may be even more beneficial.

            • Blazer

               /  August 10, 2017

              no,not silly….because you cannot sustain your original premise.Sand is a resource that is renewable…who owns it wise guy?

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  August 10, 2017

              Yes, I CAN take sand from the beach-but I WON’T, because it’s illegal.

              ‘Mummy, can I leave the table ?’
              “You can, but you may not.’

              How is collecting rainwater in a bucket the same as drilling a bore and selling the water ?

            • Blazer

               /  August 10, 2017

              @Kitty its not…but no one wants to charge you for filling your bucket.I may have to dust off my kitten stomper if you trivialise debate in this manner.

            • PDB

               /  August 10, 2017

              “I may have to dust off my kitten stomper if you trivialise debate in this manner.” – from the guy talking about………..sand

            • Blazer

               /  August 10, 2017

              answer this PDB….Sand is a resource that is renewable…who owns it wise guy?

            • PDB

               /  August 10, 2017

              How much wood could a woodchuck chuck if a woodchuck could chuck wood?

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  August 10, 2017

              Yes, oil is renewable. It comes from fossil fuels-in theory it could run out, but I suspect not.

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  August 10, 2017

              The sand is owned by everyone, except on private beaches, so no one can take it legally.

  9. Blazer

     /  August 10, 2017

    https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/farming/95650607/farmer-hits-out-at-both-national-and-labour-water-policies-as-bad-for-farming

    excerpt…’
    Ridgen uses 1.3 billion litres of water a year since he joined the CPW scheme two years ago. He has to pay $200,000 a year for that, consisting of a $185,000 to the scheme itself and $15,000 a year for monitoring and other costs.’


    it was a case of a “plague on both their houses” because National’s water quality standards recently announced for Lake Ellesmere would be crippling.’

    • Blazer

       /  August 10, 2017

      why is he paying…..water is free according to PDB and the usual orchestra!