Blogs hard out on attack

Political blogs tend to cater for their own audiences much of the time, but in an election campaign tend to put a lot of effort into attacking the other lot. That’s certainly evident at this stage of the campaign.

Kiwiblog is run by David Farrar, who has close associations with National. He can be critical of National and praise other parties, but is mostly posting praise of national and attacks on others. Posts over the last day:

Farrar should be considering displaying an authorisation statement under the Electoral Act, something The Standard displays as a precaution. Recent posts there:

For some time the Standard posts have been promoting the Greens and attacking National, and have recently rediscovered their Labourness joining the Ardern adoration club.

Whale Oil has been noticeably anti-National and pro-Winston for months, but recently has been spreading attention across the spectrum, attacking Ardern and Labour, the Greens, TOP – pretty much anyone but NZ First.

The Daily Blog is a mess of messages. Authors are out in force trying to promote their favourite issues.

John Minto doesn’t see much hope in Who to vote for?

Voting involves a moral choice.

In a capitalist economy you either vote with capitalism’s winners or with the losers. With those who have used the system to enrich themselves at the expense of others or those forced to struggle at the margins.

After this election the new government will be dominated by either National or Labour – not the dramatic choice it should be because Labour brought only a tentative, watery policy mix to the election and capitulated on tax before the first vote was cast.

Labour by itself won’t make a significant difference. Ardern has addressed the desperate social situations of child poverty and homelessness with the usual hand wringing rather than policies.

Labour talks values but these are useless without policies to give them meaning.

The best hope for a half-way decent, policy-driven, progressive government comes with a strong Green Party in coalition with Labour.

Greens are the only option this election for left wing revolutionaries.

Anyone voting National this election has a personal moral deficit.

Trying to attract voters by shaming them? Negative political attack is the fall back option for political activists, and that is evident across the blogs.

Leave a comment

35 Comments

  1. Corky

     /  19th September 2017

    ”Anyone voting National this election has a personal moral deficit.”

    That would be true. But anyone voting for the Left has an economic death wish. You choose- your morality, or your back pocket.

    Reply
  2. NOEL

     /  19th September 2017

    Hard out? Hasn’t been anything political for four days on No Minister. Maybe they’re in stunned mullet phase?

    Reply
  3. Blazer

     /  19th September 2017

    political blogs largely preach to the converted.The general public go to work,watch reality T.V,wait for the weekend to watch sports and have…a tipple.

    Reply
  4. Farrar is right on the money with this post;

    http://www.kiwiblog.co.nz/2017/09/what_will_labours_industrial_relations_policy_mean_for_businesses.html

    This Labour policy has barely been mentioned though would do far more damage to the NZ economy if enacted. This is the big payoff to the unions for shafting their preferred leader.

    “In summary Labour will do the following:

    *Entire industries will be selected to have a national award imposed on them. The industry will have no ability to say no to it, and neither will any individual employer.
    *“Minimum” standards will be set governing everything from pay rates to overtime to holidays to standard hours of work.
    *A small employer in Invercargill will be forced to pay the same wages and conditions as a large multinational employer based in Auckland.
    *Unions will be able to now initiate strikes in advance of an employer’s offer
    *Employers will now have an obligation to conclude a collective agreement. That means that so long as the union holds firm, the employer will be forced to agree to their terms eventually.
    *Unions will gain the right to enter any workplace in New Zealand to sign up members
    *New employment agreements will have automatic union membership as part of them
    *Non union members will be forced to pay fees to a union, if the union considers they get benefits from them
    *Contractors will be made into employees
    *Casual employment contracts will be made very difficult
    *Youth rates will be abolished so it will be illegal to pay a 16 year old less than $33,000 a year!
    *Even employers with just one staff member will be forced to have an elected health and safety rep
    *Any employer that the unions don’t like will be banned from any Government contract work
    *Require all Government contractors to pay 16 year olds over $40,000 a year”

    Reply
    • robertguyton

       /  19th September 2017

      Rate This ^^^ Boring

      Reply
    • David

       /  19th September 2017

      “*Youth rates will be abolished so it will be illegal to pay a 16 year old less than $33,000 a year!”

      This is a great reminder that many of these policies are based on hope with no understanding of the realities of a dynamic world. This policy does not get a world of 16yo’s earning $33k, it gets a world where no 16yo can get a job.

      Reply
      • David

         /  19th September 2017

        Anyone who down votes this comment, please show how you think this policy will work successfully in reality, because you will earn yourself a Nobel Prize in economics in achieving this.

        Reply
        • It’s supply and demand – if unskilled labour is in high enough demand then it doesn’t matter whether they are 16 or 75. The problems are a) creating a lot of value from that unskilled labour and b) a large demand for whatever that labour is converted into.

          In a tech economy unskilled labour becomes less valuable (replaced by tech) but the amount of value created from using the tech goes through the roof. It’s not a case of not being able to afford the labour, it’s a case of not needing anything like as much of it for the same size economy.

          Imo everyone needs to be able to play (ie be educated) in the tech economy for this to work, and those who can’t – due to things like currently being in university – are going to need support.

          Anything else is just delaying the inevitable.

          Reply
  5. Where did you get this detailed information from ?

    Reply
  6. Patzcuaro

     /  19th September 2017

    According to Farrar at Kiwiblog the National Party has brought the mortgage rate down from 8% under Labour to 5% under National. Of course this fall has nothing to do internal interest rates being at an almost all time low. Perhaps he his harking back to the good old days of National under Muldoon.

    “The data is from the Reserve Bank. It shows average effective mortgage rates under Labour and National.
    They’re now around 3% lower than they were under Labour. What sort of difference does that make?
    The median house price is $540,000 so an 80% mortgage on that is $432,000.
    If you have a 25 year mortgage, the difference between 5% and 8% is this:
    5% = $582 a week
    8% = $769 a week
    So a family with a median mortgage is $187 a week better off.
    And while Government policies are only one factor in interest rates, they definitely do contribute. The more inflationary the policies the higher interest rates go. The more spending there is, the higher interest rates go.”

    Of course borrowers are better off by say $187 a week but savers (usually the older section of the community) have had there spending power reduced by a similar amount. Whoops forgot to mention that.

    Reply
    • Patzcuaro

       /  19th September 2017

      Should read “international interest rates”.

      Reply
    • High Flying Duck

       /  19th September 2017

      So National, by keeping interest rates lower are helping redistribute wealth from net asset holders to the struggling borrows.
      Sounds like good policy.
      High interest rates benefit the rich.

      Reply
      • Patzcuaro

         /  19th September 2017

        It may be a transfer of wealth from savers to borrowers but it doesn’t change the fact that only half the story was told, typical selective stuff from the right.

        Reply
      • Blazer

         /  19th September 2017

        How does National control interest rates?

        Reply
        • High Flying Duck

           /  19th September 2017

          Government policies impact on interest rates. Many other factors contribute.

          Reply
          • Blazer

             /  19th September 2017

            so this is another misleading statement from you…becoming a …habit…So National, by keeping interest rates lower ”

            Reply
      • Gezza

         /  20th September 2017

        High interest rates benefit the rich.
        They benefit the savers. The savers often aren’t rich. They live frugally. Because they’re saving. I reckon low interest rates benefit the rich.

        Reply
    • Andrew

       /  19th September 2017

      This article was written in 2008. So there is a direct relationship between Labour’s spending and high interest rates.

      “Many New Zealanders are feeling the pain of the escalating price of food, runaway petrol prices, and interest rates that have risen some 60 percent since Labour has been the government 1. As the Governor of the Reserve Bank has frequently noted, one of the key drivers of those interest rate hikes has been Labour’s nine year spending spree. Over that period government spending has doubled, putting huge inflationary pressure on the economy.”

      “The problem created by the government’s profligate spending has been exacerbated by the fact that far too much of the spending has been wasteful. This has been such a concern to Treasury that in their briefing notes to the incoming government they warned: “There is little information to indicate that NewZealanders are getting more services and better results from the public sector for the large increase in resources provided. What little information exists is not encouraging. Ministers and the public are frequently surprised by poor performance. One of the few output measures is the volume of hospital patient discharges. In the three years up to 2003/04 these rose by about 5%, compared with a 21% growth in hospital spending. It is difficult to tell what improvements in health outcomes or services have been achieved for the additional expenditure on health, and whether NewZealanders are getting value for money”

      http://www.nzcpr.com/test-post-423/

      Reply
      • Patzcuaro

         /  19th September 2017

        This is from The Centre for Political Research run by ex ACT MP Muriel Newman.

        Reply
        • Andrew

           /  19th September 2017

          “As the Governor of the Reserve Bank has frequently noted”

          Please, attack the content by all means, but don’t attack the author, you do yourself a disservice. Does that mean that an ACT MP is not allowed to comment on anything? How about National, or Labour? Should we not allow anyone of any political persuasion to comment on anything?

          Don’t be silly.

          Reply
          • Patzcuaro

             /  19th September 2017

            Everybody is entitled to comment, all I was doing was giving a bit of context to your post. I made no actual attack on the messenger which can’t be said of your reply.

            Reply
            • Andrew

               /  19th September 2017

              “all I was doing was giving a bit of context to your post”

              You were doing no such thing. You were completely dismissing the article because it was written by someone that happened to be an ACT MP. Completely ignoring the fact that they were repeating what the Treasury and Reserve Bank were saying about inflation, interest rates and the then governments prolific spending.

            • Patzcuaro

               /  19th September 2017

              @Andrew I always find it informative to check the source of an article as it gives context to the message. I don’t read something and just take it as gospel.

            • Andrew

               /  19th September 2017

              Yes, a very sound and worthwhile position to take and one which I do as well. The difference being that your reply solely consisted of: “This is from The Centre for Political Research run by ex ACT MP Muriel Newman.”

              Which leads me to the logical conclusion that you had completely dismissed the content of the comment due to the person that wrote it.

            • Patzcuaro

               /  19th September 2017

              @Andrew well I would take it with a grain of salt.

            • Patzcuaro

               /  19th September 2017

              A few quick thoughts on the first paragraph.

              “Many New Zealanders are feeling the pain of the escalating price of food, runaway petrol prices, and interest rates that have risen some 60 percent since Labour has been the government.”

              The government has no control over food prices as in a market economy they are set by supply and demand. The same with petrol prices except for the tax element. Government spending can have so effect on interest rates but they are mainly set by international conditions. So I don’t see how you can blame Labour, or National for that matter, for rising or falling food and petrol prices or interest rate changes.

              “As the Governor of the Reserve Bank has frequently noted, one of the key drivers of those interest rate hikes has been Labour’s nine year spending spree.”

              As I understand it actual government debt levels were relatively flat during the years of Labour government and debt to GDP continued to fall.

              A certain degree of government spending under all governments is wasteful and they should be striving to minimize the waste. There doesn’t seem a lot concrete in the rest of the post.

            • Andrew

               /  19th September 2017

              I left the food and petrol bit in there as it was quite funny that we are moaning about the same things again 9 years later. People that blame National have short memories.

              “Government spending can have so effect on interest rates but they are mainly set by international conditions. So I don’t see how you can blame Labour, or National for that matter …”

              I completely agree. They are mainly set by international conditions, but in times of high inflation the interest rates need to be set higher than they would otherwise need to be in order to get inflation back under control.

              “As I understand it actual government debt levels were relatively flat …”

              Once again i agree. Labour didn’t have a debt problem, they had a spending problem. The 2000 economic boom was one of the biggest in history. Labour were literally swimming in cash, in no small part by bringing in massive amounts of tax revenue from the middle classes. Instead of targeting spending in the right areas, they tipped bucket loads of cash everywhere in the hope it would help, and that lead to the inflationary issues in the economy.

              I also agree with you last paragraph.

      • Patzcuaro

         /  19th September 2017

        The article starts with the following:

        “Many New Zealanders are feeling the pain of the escalating price of food, runaway petrol prices, and interest rates that have risen some 60 percent since Labour has been the government”

        No democratic government has control over food prices, they are set by supply and demand, the same with petrol prices, although the government has some input here via taxes. The government can effect interest rates by the level of their own borrowing but in this global world the dominant factor is international interest rates.

        “As the Governor of the Reserve Bank has frequently noted, one of the key drivers of those interest rate hikes has been Labour’s nine year spending spree.”

        Well, inspite of the 9 year spending spree the Labour government was able to leave office with similar government debt than when they came in. During this time debt to GDP continued to fall.

        https://www.google.co.nz/url?sa=i&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=images&cd=&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwi-9MDKirDWAhXHv7wKHdA8BygQjRwIBw&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.reddit.com%2Fr%2Fnewzealand%2Fcomments%2F1reqrp%2Ftotal_nz_government_debt_since_1993_including_the%2F&psig=AFQjCNF2lvZoKuSvprFLRgjAmtYiq-sUzQ&ust=1505870367717562

        https://www.google.co.nz/url?sa=i&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=images&cd=&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwim5Kefi7DWAhXHzbwKHeg8Aj4QjRwIBw&url=https%3A%2F%2Ffmacskasy.wordpress.com%2F2011%2F11%2F16%2Flabour-the-economic-record-2000-2008%2F&psig=AFQjCNF2lvZoKuSvprFLRgjAmtYiq-sUzQ&ust=1505870367717562

        Reply
  7. sorethumb

     /  19th September 2017

    The Standard is Labour – wow!?

    Reply
  8. Chuck Bird

     /  19th September 2017

    Good on you for allowing robust debate but not out and out abuse or defamatory remarks. Someone one on KB claimed Winston had drunk a bottle of whiskey a day for years. How would he or she know?

    Reply
  9. phantom snowflake

     /  19th September 2017

    Nothing like a Redbaiter rant to lighten the mood. Here old Russel reaches peak self-parody on his favourite subject; the oppression of that most unfortunate of species, The White Male.
    https://truebluenz.com/2017/03/26/white-males-need-to-get-angry-dont-vote-for-the-status-quo/

    Reply
  10. sorethumb

     /  19th September 2017

    Redbaiter should check his privelege (and consider intsersectionality). Female black tranny first. Redbaiter last.

    Reply

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