The lethal US

As usual after a major massacre in the United States the issue of firearms violence, violence in general, imprisonment rates and other alarming statistics re-surface for a while, but things largely remain the same.

CNN: America the lethal

Americans often think of themselves as belonging to an exceptional nation, and in many ways they do.

Americans tend to be exceptional at praising themselves.

But the United States also leads the world in other ways that don’t match the often complacent self-conception that many Americans have of their own country. The United States locks up more of its population proportionally than any other country in the world, including authoritarian regimes such as Russia and China, according to the International Centre for Prison Studies.

It also leads in another dubious statistic: More Americans are killed by fellow citizens armed with guns than in any other advanced country, according to the Small Arms Survey.

In 2011 alone, according to FBI statistics, more than 11,000 Americans were killed by firearms in the United States (a figure that excludes suicides).

Despite all the reasonable concerns in the United States about jihadist terrorism, in any given year Americans are almost 2,000 times more likely to be killed by a fellow American armed with a gun than by a jihadist terrorist. Since the 9/11 attacks, 95 Americans have been killed by jihadist terrorists, on average about six Americans a year, according to data collected by New America.

Authorities have clamped down on carrying a range of things of dubious threat on planes, but the US remains awash with lethal weapons. About have of privately owned weapons in the world are in the US.

Stephen Paddock, the perpetrator of the Las Vegas concert massacre, was found to have 23 weapons in his hotel room, and a similar number plus explosives in his home.

By contrast, in the United Kingdom, a country which is similar to the United States in terms of its laws and culture, Britain suffers around 50-60 gun deaths a year in a country where the population is around a fifth the size of the United States.

In other words, you are about 40 times more likely to be killed by an assailant with a gun in the United States than you are in the United Kingdom.

To be sure there are occasional mass-casualty attacks in Europe by murderers armed with guns, such as the assaults by the neo-Nazi Anders Breivik who killed 77 in Norway in 2011 and the attack in Dunblane, Scotland at a school where 16 children were killed in 1996, but these are exceptions to the rule.

President Donald Trump has said US will ‘be talking about gun laws as time goes by’:

President Donald Trump said Tuesday that the US will “be talking about gun laws as time goes by” in the wake of the Las Vegas shooting, the nation’s deadliest in modern history.

“Look, we have a tragedy … and what happened in Las Vegas is in many ways a miracle. The police department has done such an incredible job,” Trump said at the White House before he left for Puerto Rico.

The President was asked about a gun bill currently making its way through the House that would loosen restrictions on purchasing gun silencers.

Trump said that he would talk about that later.He didn’t answer when reporters pressed him about whether the shooting was an act of “domestic terrorism.”

Whether it is labelled terrorism or not is just semantics.

The US continues to have a huge problem with crime and violence and firearms, and with the National Rifle Association being one of the strongest lobby groups in the US.

NRASafestPlace

Who are they trying to fool? Oh, that’s right, politicians. Successfully.

While 59 dead in one incident is extraordinary, the current death count from firearms in the US this year  is 11,689. There have been  274 ‘mass shootings’.

Little is likely to change, apart from the location of the next massacre, and the number of  casualties.

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30 Comments

  1. Corly

     /  4th October 2017

    Not only America. While Britain has nowhere near the amount of gun crime as the US, it harbours another killer, one that needs no locking and loading- knife crime. Add to that Muslim terrorists and the picture is far from rosy. This in a country with virtually no guns. But it still managed 5,864 firearms offences, up by 13% largely due to a rise in crimes involving handguns.

    http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-39729601

    https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2017/sep/06/boy-jailed-murder-quamari-serunkuma-barnes

    Reply
  2. David

     /  4th October 2017

    Americans have hyperbolic news networks that leaves them fearful so they tool up for protection when in fact most of the shootings happen in poor and black neighbourhoods where they shoot each other. The areas with the highest shooting rates, Chicago,s rates are just mind numbing, are typically Democrat areas and typically very safe seats for them.
    There are two America,s and this continued under Obama which for me made him far worse than say Trump with some dodgy tweets, he had the house, senate and white house and did pretty much nothing, sad.

    Reply
  3. Ray

     /  4th October 2017

    Rather than compare the US with the UK which let’s be honest other than the English language (and some consider that a stretch) have little in common.
    Rather compare the US with Canada.
    http://www.nationalobserver.com/2015/12/04/news/how-american-gun-deaths-and-gun-laws-compare-canadas
    And for those of you who don’t click it is strikingly different (3.5 compared with 55 per million) even though general rifle ownership is similar though handguns and “assault rifles” are restricted

    Reply
    • Corky

       /  4th October 2017

      What have Canada and America got in common apart from boarders and a shared English/French heritage?

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  4th October 2017

        Well, they both have lots of white people & now people of other skin colours, most of whom speak English, some also French, they have strong defence & trade ties & a defence alliance, they have a strkingly similar accent, play the same kind of football game, they both have large areas of land that are ice-covered, they both occupy the North American continental landmass, & I’m sure there are many other similarities.

        Reply
    • David

       /  4th October 2017

      “Rather than compare the US with the UK which let’s be honest other than the English language (and some consider that a stretch) have little in common.
      Rather compare the US with Canada.”

      The US and Canada have very different demographics. It’s not possible to make any such compassion without understanding who is committing the crimes.

      Reply
  4. Patzcuaro

     /  4th October 2017

    New Zealand ranked second safest country after Iceland in this list. The US is the 50th out of 163 most dangerous tucked in between El Salvador and Rwanda. Not the best of company for the US.

    https://www.atlasandboots.com/most-dangerous-countries-in-the-world-ranked/

    Reply
    • Corky

       /  4th October 2017

      ‘New Zealand ranked second safest country after Iceland in this list. ”

      Do we appreciate that glowing stat?

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  4th October 2017

        I do.
        Would be good to be No1 – but we are with Rugby & the Americas Cup, probably heaps of other things, & I’m not one to complain, as you know.

        Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  4th October 2017

          I do, too.

          I appreciate it that we haven’t had a mass shooting for decades and that one can count the number that we have had on the fingers of one hand and don’t have more than one a day.

          Reply
  5. Joe Bloggs

     /  4th October 2017

    Canadians are huge gun owners, and yet lack anything like the gun-murder rate of the USA.

    Sweden, Germany, Switzerland, Austria, and Norway also have high gun ownership rates, but little gun-related street crime.

    Easy gun access has its own issues. But widespread gun ownership explains next to nothing. It describes the situation we are in, but without giving us a sense of how or why we have come to it, without telling us what it means. How has the USA come to the point that so many people feel compelled to own guns—and to use them—in the first place?

    But the focus here should not be on why it is dangerous for Americans to have guns lying around as it is on why it is so dangerous for Americans to have guns lying around.

    Here’s a suggestion about another place to focus. Try looking at a fake president who sees “good people” amongst the Charlotteville white supremacists, and who calls men of colour “sons of bitches who should be fired” because they kneel in peaceful, silent protest at social and racial injustice.

    Amerikkka doesn’t just have a ‘gun problem’. It has a white racist empire capitalism problem, and the trend in gun violence is just a symptom of a deeper sickness.

    Reply
    • David

       /  4th October 2017

      “Canadians are huge gun owners, and yet lack anything like the gun-murder rate of the USA.

      Sweden, Germany, Switzerland, Austria, and Norway also have high gun ownership rates, but little gun-related street crime.”

      All these countries have the same thing missing.

      Reply
  6. Zedd

     /  4th October 2017

    If someone took a potshot at Mr T, I’m guessing gun laws would be ‘on the agenda’ quick-smart ?!
    btw; I hear the ‘price on his hair/head’ has jumped again 😀

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  4th October 2017

      How can that be true ? The price of nylon hasn’t gone up, surely.

      If you look carefully, you’ll see that he has a bulletproof screen around him in public-it
      can be sen sometimes when something is reflected in it.

      Reply
  7. Zedd

     /  4th October 2017

    I heard another CRAZY part of USAs gun laws; it is supposedly against the law to sell machine guns (fully automatic) to the public, BUT they can buy semi-auto ‘assault rifles’ & also a device that fits onto one that effectively turns a semi-auto, into a fully auto-machine gun.. as the Las Vegas shooter reportedly did.
    There is also no limits on how many rounds of ammo. you can buy either ?

    Then they wonder, how or why these things happen !!
    I thought the ‘Wild west’ ended in 19th century ? 😦

    Reply
    • Corky

       /  4th October 2017

      ”Then they wonder, how or why these things happen !!

      We have the same problem with infant murders. 94 in the last 10 years if I heard correctly.

      Still is the Wild West here too, Zedd%

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  4th October 2017

        Why do you always add % to the end of Zedd’s name, Corky?

        Reply
        • Zedd

           /  5th October 2017

          dont worry, be happy now 😀

          maybe because I put an E in his/hers ? CorKey 🙂

          Reply
          • Gezza

             /  5th October 2017

            No I was really just wondering if he does it just to be a prat?

            Because he seems to have got this idea in his head now that I’m often being a prat to him (not sure why 😳 ). So, if that is why he does it, I was going to ask him:
            1. if he can be a prat, why can’t others, and
            2. if someone else, hypothetically speaking, wanted to be one – why should they be expected to only follow his example of how to be one?

            He hadn’t got back to me, so I haven’t been able to discuss this with him yet.

            Reply

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