Yang didn’t disclose Chinese intelligence connections

National list MP Jian Yang didn’t disclose all of his Chinese work history in his application for New Zealand citizenship.

NZH: Jian Yang didn’t disclose Chinese intelligence connections in citizenship application

A newly reelected National Party MP said to have been investigated by New Zealand’s intelligence agencies didn’t disclose links to Chinese military intelligence when becoming a citizen, documents show.

Newly unredacted documents from Jian Yang’s 2004 citizenship application show Yang, who moved to New Zealand in 1999, did not list the 15 years he spent studying and working at the People’s Liberation Air Force Engineering Academy and the Luoyang Foreign Languages Institute from 1978. Both institutions are part of China’s military intelligence apparatus.

In his citizenship disclosures, Yang only lists his work and study history at the Australian National University and the University of Auckland.

The citizenship file had been released, following public clamour, the week prior to the election, but heavy redactions – said to protect Yang’s privacy – meant it was impossible to see what, if any, disclosures he had made about spy history in China.

The Herald complained to the Ombudsman about these redactions, forcing a rethink at the Department of Internal Affairs.

A spokesman for the Ombudsman’s office yesterday afternoon said: “DIA have reconsidered its decision to withhold Dr Yang’s answers to the study and work history questions on the citizenship application.”

In a press conference after news of his background broke, Yang said he had served as a civilian officer in the PLA and was required to not to name the institutions as a condition of being allowed to leave China.

He said he was not a spy, but conceded he was involved in training spies to assess intercepted communications.

Yang said he instead referred on applications to “partnership” civilian universities who had a relationship with the military institutions. “It is not that I am deliberately trying to cover-up. It’s because the system asked me to use the partner university,” he said.

At the time Yang denied making false declarations when becoming a citizen – a prerequisite to being able to enter parliament – but said he was reviewing his citizenship application to make sure it was correct.

The Herald say they have filed more OIA requests for information on Yang, but some may prove hard to get.

This week the SIS declined again to answer any questions about Yang, citing national security as a reason for withholding information.

“NZSIS does not comment on specific cases or individuals,” a spokesman for the spy agency said.

“I can neither confirm nor deny the existence or non-existence of information.”

The University of Auckland has refused to release information relating to his appointment in 1999 as a senior lecturer in political science, citing Yang’s privacy. This refusal is also the subject to a complaint to the Ombudsman.

Immigration NZ is still considering whether to release information relating to Yang’s residency applications, a precursor to his citizenship.

Is there any cause for concern about what Yang has done as a New Zealand citizen, or as an MP?

Or is it just possible concerns due to his past in China?

Should all immigrants who become citizens and then become MPs be scrutinised?

Perhaps Julie Anne Genter should be investigated just in case she’s working for the CIA.

William Sio could be check out in case he’s a Samoan secret agent.

Or if it’s only Chinese we are concerned about what about Raymond Huo? He’s probably fine but why not be sure?

Perhaps also of interest – why was  Jian Yang investigated, who prompted it, and why was his history revealed during an election campaign?

58 Comments

  1. Blazer

     /  October 13, 2017

    typical running defence line for National.Yang is a very good fundraiser for the National Party…never mind his past,deflect,obstruct and carry on in true blue…style.

  2. Blazer

     /  October 13, 2017

    and furthermore you do not have to be an immigrant M.P to be the subject of scrutiny.The media delve into all M.P’s backgrounds.Ask Bennett,Jones,and countless others.Yangs excuse that he couldn’t divulge his past otherwise he couldn’t leave the country is…feeble and unacceptable to say the least.Four corners have investigated Chinese political influence in Australia.The surprising revelation to me was that young Chinese students living and studying in Australia,put China and her interests….first,above all other considerations.

  3. Alan Wilkinson

     /  October 13, 2017

    Some good questions at the end. PG. I doubt we’ll get any answers.

    • Blazer

       /  October 13, 2017

      most of Petes questions are fascetious, seeking to minimise the gravity of Yangs…situation.

      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  October 13, 2017

        They are not facetious. Yang was evidently examined by the security services and cleared for citizenship. Yang’s situation is simply the target of political attacks. We should know who is behind them.

        • robertguyton

           /  October 13, 2017

          A question for Pete: do you think it is significant that Yang “did not list the 15 years he spent studying and working at the People’s Liberation Air Force Engineering Academy and the Luoyang Foreign Languages Institute from 1978. Both institutions are part of China’s military intelligence apparatus.”?
          If not, why not?

          • Alan Wilkinson

             /  October 13, 2017

            Of course it’s significant. And Yang gave his reason.

            • robertguyton

               /  October 13, 2017

              His “reason” was, “China told me not to say”, yes?
              “In a press conference after news of his background broke, Yang said he had served as a civilian officer in the PLA and was required to not to name the institutions as a condition of being allowed to leave China.”

              Do you, Pete (?) accept that as a reasonable explanation and do you believe we should accept that as sufficient and cease our questioning immediately? Alan? Really? “China said…” Happy with that, are ya?

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  October 13, 2017

              Not a question of whether I am happy. The question is what you can do when you live under a Communist regime and want to escape it. You do what you have to do.

            • robertguyton

               /  October 13, 2017

              What about his obligations to New Zealand law? Does China have such a long arm that he has to contravene our rules because of an agreement he made in the past, in another country?
              If you believe that’s okay, have you considered what else he might have agreed not to reveal? Should MPs in the NZ Government be free to keep such secrets and be exempt from investigation? I’m not impressed by your willingness to turn a blind-eye, Alan.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  October 13, 2017

              I’ve never said he should be exempt from investigation. I said he was investigated and now is being politically targeted despite that.

              Your eagerness to turn a blind eye to the facts of living as a Communist citizen is noted.

            • Zedd

               /  October 13, 2017

              another ‘loony left’ alert, from AW ???

            • Corky

               /  October 13, 2017

              You can never have enough of them…Zedd%.

            • Fight4NZ

               /  October 13, 2017

              “.. is being politically targeted.. ” etc = Nothing to see here. Move along.
              National lackies busy with the Teflon as usual.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  October 13, 2017

              Lefties hate simple and obvious facts.

            • Fight4NZ

               /  October 13, 2017

              Simple and obvious:
              Immigrant (not asylum seeker) applies for residence.
              Lies on form.
              Response options
              1 revoke and deport
              2 accept under skill shortages category and refer on to National party for MP position.

        • Blazer

           /  October 13, 2017

          so any immigrant can trot out the line that Afghanistan or whatever authorities told me not to mention x,y&z ..and that’s just fine and dandy..here in NZ.

          • Alan Wilkinson

             /  October 13, 2017

            Consider how asylum seekers are treated, B. There is a continuum of power and oppression in the world that has to be recognised and dealt with.

            • Blazer

               /  October 13, 2017

              The Minister can deprive you of your NZ citizenship if:
              •you were granted your citizenship because of: ◦fraud
              ◦false representation
              ◦information you deliberately concealed when you applied for citizenship
              ◦a mistake, or

              •you got citizenship of another country and acted against the interests of NZ.

  4. Corky

     /  October 13, 2017

    I think your summation shows naivety, Pete. Like many Kiwis, like I once was, you are too trusting. I can understand that given the paradise we live in. We struggle for nothing.
    But the mindset of other cultures are different. You must factor that into your calculations.

    Quote:

    ”Perhaps also of interest – why was Jian Yang investigated, who prompted it, and why was his history revealed during an election campaign?”

    Spot on. Maybe the SIS leaked this information to make their clean-up job easier. That’s ironically least murky of all possible scenarios. Things get very murky if it wasn’t the SIS.

    • Gezza

       /  October 13, 2017

      I very much doubt the NZSIS leaked anything Corky. But I too am concerned about this gentleman & his past employment.

  5. sorethumb

     /  October 13, 2017

    But as the FT report notes, China has been increasingly active in placing and cultivating people in Western democracies and helping them gradually reach positions of political influence, and it reports concrete areas of concern in Canada (including from the intelligence authorities) and Australia.
    https://croakingcassandra.com/2017/09/14/on-standards-in-public-life-and-jian-yang/

    Not only that but some New Zealanders might be on the payroll for Chinese interests.

  6. sorethumb

     /  October 13, 2017

    Mother Globalist will not want Little NZ to other it’s brother China. Mother globalist is the most important person in the room.

  7. alloytoo

     /  October 13, 2017

    I think we should be more worried about the Greens MP’s having purged the ethical environmentalists prior to the election all that are left are associated with global eco-terrorists

  8. duperez

     /  October 13, 2017

    What’s the fuss?
    He was only at the People’s Liberation Air Force Engineering Academy and the Luoyang Foreign Languages Institute for 15 short years. So what if the institutions are part of China’s military intelligence apparatus?

    Deliberately throwing a stink bomb into the discussion …
    Weinstein, no-one said anything, it’s not important, no-one said anything, it’s not important, no-one said anything, it’s not important – and suddenly all the years later it is important.

    Like planting a seed and not noticing it until it’s a big tree and it’s fallen on the house.

    Like planting a plant …

  9. sorethumb

     /  October 13, 2017

    SJW Slater looks after Chinese interests.

  10. Zedd

     /  October 13, 2017

    methinks natz were likely aware of this. But as with their attack on Labour ‘making an issue (racist) about real estate being bought by people with chinese sounding names’.. its all about keeping the asian community onside, especially during election year; now make up a greater percentage (>20%) of the population, than tangata whenua/maori (15%)

    • sorethumb

       /  October 14, 2017

      Although the adoption of a colorblind universal immigration policy was rather tentative and lacking in long-term planning, it was propelled by a clear realization that New Zealand needed to reposition itself from being on the Pacific fringe to being a more active participant in an increasingly globalized world. The first step toward global participation was engagement with Asia as a close neighbor. It is against this policy background that Chinese immigration to New Zealand should be examined.
      ….
      That’s just the official narrative

      The immigration policy review in 1986 was part of a much larger agenda for change in New Zealand (Bedford 1996). It was not essentially a change in state policy with a primary focus on one region of the world, as Parr (2000:329) suggests, although clearly through the 1980s and 1990s immigration from countries in Asia was a highly topical issue for both politicians and the public. The attitudes of New Zealanders in the mid-1990s towards immigration may not have reflected the positive perspective on the value of diversity in our society that is contained in the Review of Immigration Policy August 1986. But this does not mean that the globalisation of immigration to New Zealand was an “unintended consequence of policy changes in 1986”. It was a deliberate strategy, based on a premise that the “infusion of new elements to New Zealand life has been of immense value to the development of this country to date and will, as a result of this Government’s review of immigration policy, become even more important in the future” (Burke 1986:330).
      The Japanese just sent cars

  11. Blazer

     /  October 13, 2017

    interesting comments…
    ‘Buying and selling real estate is one of the best ways to bribe politicians. With the housing prices what they are it’s easy to overpay for a property by a few hundred thousand or even a couple of million without anybody raising an eyebrow.

    This is done all over the world and there is no reason to think it doesn’t happen here.’


    Reward is a reward. It’s perfectly normal for people to be given their rewards (bribes) after they leave office. Often this comes in the form of job titles like consultant, advisor, board member, fellow etc where they get paid hundreds of thousands of dollars for doing nothing but it can also come in a form of awarding contracts to their businesses, buying their real estate at inflated prices or a thousand other ways.

    You throw me this contract, you’ll be rewarded after you get out of office. You pass this law which will allow me to make another ten million a year and I’ll make sure you get a cushy job after you leave the office. You get rid of this pesky labour law and I’ll buy your property at 5% over market value.

    For example

    Brady’s report highlights the numerous former National MPs who have joined the boards of Chinese banks; Ruth Richardson and Chris Tremain are directors of Bank of China in New Zealand; Don Brash chairs the Industrial Bank of China in New Zealand; and former Prime Minister Dame Jenny Shipley chairs the New Zealand subsidiary of the China Construction Bank.’

    • Fight4NZ

       /  October 13, 2017

      Or not even wait like Judith Collins

    • Fight4NZ

       /  October 13, 2017

      Sell off premium Auckland estate property at absorbitant $20 million.
      John Key, take a bow.

      • Gezza

         /  October 13, 2017

        absorbitant, in the sense you have used it, is a new word which is far, far superior to anything PZ ever came up with.

        Well done! 🎖

  12. sorethumb

     /  October 13, 2017

    flipper

    C R A P !
    And if is NOT crap, wot about the union and sick rainbow parachutists ???????????
    https://www.kiwiblog.co.nz/2017/10/general_debate_13_october_2017.html#comments

    Jim Bolger’s property developer mate springs to the rescue.

  13. sorethumb

     /  October 13, 2017

    When Chinese policymakers, commenting on the China-Taiwan conflict, say that “we would rather lose a thousand soldiers than lose an inch of land” (quoted in NEWSWEEK, August 30, 1999), they are assigning extraordinary value to their homeland, indicating the lengths they would go to protect it against claims made by other groups. We may ask first, just how prevalent are these loyalties? Second, what are the conditions under which they occur, when are they exacerbated, when ameliorated? Third, how can intense loyalties be explained; what kinds of theories are relevant and how can they be evaluated?1
    http://conf.sabanciuniv.edu/sites/conf.sabanciuniv.edu/files/Occasional_Paper_6_final.doc

    In New Zealand we celebrate diversity etc, etc

    • Fight4NZ

       /  October 13, 2017

      Fourth, why on earth would you sell them large tracts of our land?

    • Corky

       /  October 13, 2017

      ”OH, East is East, and West is West, and never the twain shall meet,
      Till Earth and Sky stand presently at God’s great Judgment Seat;
      But there is neither East nor West, Border, nor Breed, nor Birth,
      When two strong men stand face to face, tho’ they come from the ends of the earth!”

      The Ballad of East and West

      Rudyard Kipling (1865–1936)

      To that I would add: always remember Asians can get into our minds, but it takes an extraordinary Westerner to penetrate their minds and account for all subtle shades of thought and action.

      Great to see Rudyard Kipling making a come back. He was tossed away as an anachronism to a former age. Such a shallow recapitulation an extraordinary life.

  14. sorethumb

     /  October 14, 2017

    DENTITY 10 Oct 2017
    The changing face of New Zealand
    From Nine To Noon, 11:28 am on 10 October 2017

    The year they are predicting Asians will supercede Moari is 2023. So the recent population growth (immigration) is bringing those tipping points forward.
    Ryan: Weve had four years of record high. And that was not anticipated.
    Are we pretty much now just about the most diverse country on earth?

    Spoonley: Absolutely we are. One of the key elements of those projections is the growth of the Asian populations (and I want to pluralise that). And when you look at the country or a city like Auckland it is much higher than any comparative city. Not Vancouver, Vancouver is higher. But in terms of a city like Sydney then the proportion of Aucklands population that is predicted to be Asian is quite a bit higher than those type of cities. And by the way, we track across to London and we think, gosh, we are in quite a multicultural place here, but when you look at the total Asian population, the proportion relative to the local population we still beat them.
    http://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/ninetonoon/audio/2018617301/the-changing-face-of-new-zealand
    The name of that game is “no Othering”

  15. Gezza

     /  October 14, 2017

    No. Too rich. Probably too fatty too. Me doc might go ape.
    What have you got for beef?

    • Blazer

       /  October 14, 2017

      it was just that the amounts of grain you are ‘feeding’ your ..ducks,raised..an eyebrow.