“Trump is becoming a failed president”

Donald Trump has been struggling to score any significant policy wins, he gets bogged down with petty squabbles, and there seems to be growing disagreements and splits amongst the Republican Party.

I think it’s too soon to judge his presidency, a major policy win or a war could turn things around quite quickly, but in the absence of substance beyond his at times extreme rhetoric there is growing commentary about his failures, and speculation about his failure as a president.

Juan Williams: Trump is becoming a failed president

 

A Morning Consult poll released last week found Trump losing support in states he easily carried last year. He is down 23 points in Tennessee since his inauguration in January, down 21 points in Mississippi, down 20 in Kentucky, down 19 in Kansas and down 17 in Indiana.

Overall, 55 percent of the country disapproves of the job he is doing as president, according the most recent RealClearPolitics average. At the three-quarter mark of his first year in office, Trump is the least popular new president in history.

On Capitol Hill, House and Senate Republicans are also walking away from Trump.

In part, this is due to his attacks on Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) and Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.).

Then there are the threats to incumbent Republicans from Stephen Bannon, formerly Trump’s chief strategist.

Bannon said last week he plans to challenge incumbent Republican senators in seven states, including Arizona’s Jeff Flake, Mississippi’s Roger Wicker, Nebraska’s Deb Fischer, Nevada’s Dean Heller and Wyoming’s John Barrasso.

“Creating a civil war inside the Republican Party may feel good, but I think as a strategy, it is stunningly stupid,” former Speaker Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.) said of Bannon’s plan.

That looks like team Trump in disarray.

One Republican who has always doubted Trump’s credentials (and has been attacked by Trump) is Senator John McCain.

McCain, in speech, denounces ‘spurious nationalism’

…his speech was one of warning, and seemed very much directed at the leadership approach of President Donald Trump and his supporters.

“To fear the world we have organized and led for three-quarters of a century, to abandon the ideals we have advanced around the globe, to refuse the obligations of international leadership and our duty to remain ‘the last best hope of earth’ for the sake of some half-baked, spurious nationalism cooked up by people who would rather find scapegoats than solve problems is as unpatriotic as an attachment to any other tired dogma of the past that Americans consigned to the ash heap of history.”

“We live in a land made of ideals, not blood and soil. We have a moral obligation to continue in our just cause, and we would bring more than shame on ourselves if we don’t. We will not thrive in a world where our leadership and ideals are absent. We wouldn’t deserve to.”

Trump has been having spats with various sports people. One respected coach has responded.

The Nation:  ‘A Soulless Coward’: Coach Gregg Popovich Responds to Trump

We’ve all seen the San Antonio Spurs’ future Hall of Fame coach Gregg Popovich in a state of exasperation on the sidelines, or in postgame news conferences. Many of us have also heard him speak with great vexation and clarity about the direction of this country and the actions of Donald Trump, particularly on Trump’s “disgusting tenor and tone and all the comments that have been xenophobic, homophobic, racist, misogynistic.” But I have never heard this man more frustrated, more fed up, and more tense with anger than he was today.

Coach Pop called me up after hearing the president’s remarks explaining why he hadn’t mentioned the four US soldiers killed in an ambush in Niger. Trump said, “President Obama and other presidents, most of them didn’t make calls, a lot of them didn’t make calls. I like to call when it’s appropriate, when I think I’m able to do it.”

Maybe it was the bald-faced nature of this lie, maybe it was Pop’s own history in the military, but the coach clearly had to vent. He said, “I want to say something, and please just let me talk, and please make sure this is on the record.”

This is Popovich  on the record.

“I’ve been amazed and disappointed by so much of what this president had said, and his approach to running this country, which seems to be one of just a never ending divisiveness. But his comments today about those who have lost loved ones in times of war and his lies that previous presidents Obama and Bush never contacted their families are so beyond the pale, I almost don’t have the words.”

“This man in the Oval Office is a soulless coward who thinks that he can only become large by belittling others. This has of course been a common practice of his, but to do it in this manner—and to lie about how previous presidents responded to the deaths of soldiers—is as low as it gets.

“We have a pathological liar in the White House, unfit intellectually, emotionally, and psychologically to hold this office, and the whole world knows it, especially those around him every day.

“The people who work with this president should be ashamed, because they know better than anyone just how unfit he is, and yet they choose to do nothing about it. This is their shame most of all.”

I think that the last comment about those who work with the president is in part at least unfair. I think that some of those working with and for Trump have the interests of the country at heart and are trying their best to cover for the inadequacies and irrationality of Trump.

They are trying to control Trump and limit the damage he does – and especially, they will be aware of the damage trump could do if he runs amok with the US nuclear arsenal (I think they have about 9,000 nukes).

But outside the White House Trump remains unpopular, and there are growing concerns being expressed about his fitness to remain as president.

Unfortunately Trump has said a lot of stupid and unhelpful and unpresidential things, but he hasn’t done anything (that we know of) that is troubling enough to demand he steps down.

It’s possible Trump may get what is required of being president, but there is little sign of his current obnoxiousness and incompetence being turned around.

We – not just the US but the world – may have to wait until Trump does something bad enough to step him over the line, and others step in to put a stop to him.

That is if the US or the world is in a state to do anything then.

 

43 Comments

  1. David

     /  October 18, 2017

    Juan is so one eyed he is off the scale I watch him most days on The Five on Fox news which is a great show, set your DVRs.
    You have to admit Trump is a quick learner and we dont get the sort of excitement he produced on a near daily basis. The former head of FEMA under Clinton scored him an A plus for his hurricane response, he has sent DACA back to congress to sort, stopped the illegal subsidies to health insurers, sent the Iran deal back to congress which legally and constitutionally is where they belong, is trying to simplify the worlds most complicated tax system, ISIS is nearly wiped out, the stockmarkets have put on 5.2 trillion, unemployment is the lowest in 43 years, 11 million people are off food stamps, I could go on.
    The President under the constitution doesnt have a huge amount of power to enact legislation, Trumps biggest problem is the same as Obama,s and its a few Republican Senators holding up the agenda he was elected to carry out.

    • Gezza

       /  October 18, 2017

      ISIS is nearly wiped out
      1. Counting your chickens before they’ve hatched there. They can still move & morph, & they are.
      2. Kurds, Iraqis, & Syrians, are mostly doing the wiping out in Iraq & Syria, & Team Obama, not Team Trump are the ones who’ve helped a little bit on the ground.

      • David

         /  October 18, 2017

        True but they are pretty much out of Iraq and near gone in Syria from having a territory that was nearly the size of the UK. It was Trump who said to the military you get on with it unlike Obama who had every move run through the White House.
        Trump should get some credit there are a lot of innocent people no longer living under a murderous terrorist regime

        • Gezza

           /  October 18, 2017

          Bizzare thing’p, Aljazeera was reporting yesterday that Arab tribal leaders had brokered a deal for some ISIS soldiers to be allowed to leave Raqqa?

    • Pickled Possum

       /  October 18, 2017

      “11 million people are off food stamps, I could go on.”

      Morena David. Falling SNAP Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program
      aka Food Stamps beneficiaries, has been manipulated, as I see it by …
      The reinstating work requirements.
      Some states can waive the 3 month time limit when unemployment rates rise.
      Numbers peaked in 2013 47.6 million
      2016 44.2 million
      July 7th … 42.6 million Americans received SNAP benefits

      On April 1st 2016 after the three month period passed an estimated
      500,000 – 1 million people in 22 states lost their benefits.

      Melissa Boteach Vice Prez for the Poverty To Prosperity Program at
      The Centre for American Progress says,
      “It is a good thing if more people are finding jobs and finding higher wages.
      It’s a bad thing if people are living in areas where there are No jobs or
      they have barriers to work and they’re not able to access nutrition assistance.
      Both scenarios are playing out.”

      Most households on food stamps have a child, elderly person, or disabled person.
      An analysis by the U.S. Department of Agriculture on program participation showed that nearly half of SNAP participants (47 percent) were under the age of 18, and 8 percent were age 60 or older.

      Prezzy Trump has proposed a budget that would cut $193 Billion
      to the program over 10 years. The Prez is not a fan of SNAP.

      I have a close American friend whose church picks up the some short fall in America.
      She reminded me daily for some years of this problem.
      Starving people who for one reason or another could not enter into the world of working people, OR who work 2 or 3 jobs, that needed Christian help to eat healthy food.

      It reminds me of how NZ government has said at times, unemployment is fallen blah de blah
      and they forget to say they are now on work for benefits or transferred to sickness or invalid or equivalent speak.Just not on the unemployment benefit.
      Pushing around numbers to fit in their prospective boxes.

  2. George

     /  October 18, 2017

    Obviously fake news writing in support of fake news is currently all the go in the US leftist media.

  3. Corky

     /  October 18, 2017

    I like the way the American Presidency is in a complete shambles, yet everyone gets on with life while awaiting the Presidents next twitter tirade.

    I think Petes right. Trump needs a war or policy win to stop the rot. At the moment he is promoting his tax cuts.

  4. Gezza

     /  October 18, 2017

    I am currently witholding comment pending sighting an unbiased assessment from Sir Alan.
    Sir Gerald.

    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  October 18, 2017

      Waiting for Godot – Trump haters waiting for him to crash and burn. Meanwhile life goes on: business booms, illegal immigration stalls, unemployment falls, ISIS is defeated, judges get appointed and Washington squawks. Wake me up when something happens.

      • Gezza

         /  October 18, 2017

        Many thanks, Sir Alan
        Humble words.
        Have you voted in today’s survey yet?

        • Pickled Possum

           /  October 18, 2017

          Hey Gez, I learnt something interesting today on the internet.

          Godot …”Waiting for Godot (/ˈɡɒdoʊ/ GOD-oh) is a play by Samuel Beckett, in which two characters, Vladimir and Estragon, wait for the arrival of someone named Godot who never arrives, and while waiting they engage in a variety of discussions and encounter three other characters.”

          Thanks Wiki your just as important as Uncle Google.
          Thanks to the Good Doc for the lead. 😉

          Has any body read The Shallows: What the internet is doing to our brains. yet?

        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  October 18, 2017

          I did. Much as I enjoy Corks he does suffer somewhat from the addiction you mention. Long may he continue to wind you up.

          • Why not read the play, Possum ? it’s one that can be read as well as seen on stage, and is quite brilliant. I don’t lend books out so won’t offer to lend you my copy.

            • Gezza

               /  October 18, 2017

              Commendable. Can’t abide people who offer to lend one a copy of their book but then tell one after one accepts that unfortunately they don’t lend them out.
              Sir Gerald.

      • Fight4NZ

         /  October 18, 2017

        Perhaps it is because many of his main policies are like Winstons.

  5. sorethumb

     /  October 18, 2017

    One of Obama’s first acts was to return Churchill’s bust.

    • Gezza

       /  October 18, 2017

      One of Trump’s was to send poor Sean out to claim more people attended his inauguration than anyone’s.

      • Untrue about the Churchill bust-it was lent but has been returned. There were two, both Epsteins (blimey), both are now in Washington.

  6. Joe Bloggs

     /  October 18, 2017

    I think it’s too soon to judge his presidency

    Ah, Peter, Peter, Peter, whatever shall we do with you? Ever ready to allow a glimmer of redemption for a lost cause… 🙂

    • Corky

       /  October 18, 2017

      Yep, I can vouch for that. I’m not talking about me though.

  7. Zedd

     /  October 18, 2017

    I saw on the news a previous female contestant on Mr Ts TV show, has publicly accused him of sexual harassment.. could be the start of a ‘Weinstein-like’ flood ?
    He has bragged about such things before.

    Many commentators are saying he wont last out his 1st term.. methinks, he may not last out this year !? 😀

    • Corky

       /  October 18, 2017

      Shades of Israel? But of course, Lurchy. What’s the common denominator?

      Arseholes who wont take no for an answer and continue sticking their noses in where they aren’t wanted.

      • lurcher1948

         /  October 18, 2017

        The USA hiding behind a wall while the earth gets on with living.One day in the state’s parents will take their children to the wall and say”there is freedom over that wall get over it, here there’s state control inbreeding and donald trump, and the Puritan church ,who remembers the USA

        • David

           /  October 18, 2017

          Strange to compare this to Israel, given not the only has that wall been hugely successful in reducing the murders of Israeli citizens, it’s also drawn a very clear line as to which side has the freedom and which side does not,

          • Gezza

             /  October 18, 2017

            Do you understand why they call parts of illegally-seized Palestine the occupied territories?
            Do you know Gaza is surrounded, blockaded, how many thousand Palestinians were murdered, & how many houses over a large area were destroyed by Israel’s Army, Navy & Air Force in 2014, David?

          • Gezza

             /  October 18, 2017

            Do you understand that Palestinians are not therefore free, David?

          • Gezza

             /  October 18, 2017

            Do you understand who their captors are?

          • Gezza

             /  October 18, 2017

            Hint:
            1. Israel.
            And therefore,
            2. Hamas as well.

      • Corky

         /  October 18, 2017

        Maybe we need a wall in New Zealand. To be built on the shoreline Those who support Israel on the land side, and those who make excuses for Palestinian atrocities on a one way barge trip to the promised land… literally.

        • Gezza

           /  October 18, 2017

          Not a good idea, imo. Shocker of a place ever since the new chaps moved in on it.
          Best to wait for Trump to make a deal. Honest broker, back pocket of Jared & godfather Bibi sort of thing. Bound to succeed. If Bibi can avoid a stint inside. In a spot of bother there I gather. New besties the Saudis might be able to pay his hefty fine if there is one tho. Always look on the bright side!
          Best thing!
          Sir Gerald.

        • Gezza

           /  October 18, 2017

          Corky. While you can happily lob grenades & hypothetical nukes at the Palestinians along with WO, from your networked alt-right compounds, & conclude everything is the Palestinians fault &, presumably either wiping them out or keeping them all penned up & starving in an overcrowded concentration camp is the answer, the simple fact is some kind of peaceful bloody solution has to be worked out that involves genuine give & take on both sides.

          If it isn’t p, the problem isn’t ever going to go away. And if any deal doesn’t invlove allowing expelled Palestinian descendants to return to at least half the bloody land, when Israel continues to welcome Jews from everywhere, that’s never going to be acceptable. Until that gets onto the table, Hamas will continue to be as big a cancer in the place as the Zionists. All three Abrahamic bloody religions are either the cause, and/or the contributors, to this mess.

          You know what I really hope? That Trump could actually pull off a deal. Something that said to the Zionist expansionists – Stop! And that said to Hamas – Stop!
          Both of you FFS, accept the existence of the other! I’m not hopeful.

  8. High Flying Duck

     /  October 18, 2017

    It will be interesting to see where the “Russia” story goes after this expose by The Hill:

    http://thehill.com/policy/national-security/355749-fbi-uncovered-russian-bribery-plot-before-obama-administration

    “Before the Obama administration approved a controversial deal in 2010 giving Moscow control of a large swath of American uranium, the FBI had gathered substantial evidence that Russian nuclear industry officials were engaged in bribery, kickbacks, extortion and money laundering designed to grow Vladimir Putin’s atomic energy business inside the United States, according to government documents and interviews.

    The Obama administration’s decision to approve Rosatom’s purchase of Uranium One has been a source of political controversy since 2015.

    That’s when conservative author Peter Schweitzer and The New York Times documented how Bill Clinton collected hundreds of thousands of dollars in Russian speaking fees and his charitable foundation collected millions in donations from parties interested in the deal while Hillary Clinton presided on the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States.

    The Obama administration and the Clintons defended their actions at the time, insisting there was no evidence that any Russians or donors engaged in wrongdoing and there was no national security reason for any member of the committee to oppose the Uranium One deal.

    But FBI, Energy Department and court documents reviewed by The Hill show the FBI in fact had gathered substantial evidence well before the committee’s decision that Vadim Mikerin — the main Russian overseeing Putin’s nuclear expansion inside the United States — was engaged in wrongdoing starting in 2009.”