Green policy wins leaked

As soon as the new government was confirmed the Greens started leaking.

Here are their probable portfolios, and this is The Greens’ 10 big policy gains:

1. Climate action

“Significant climate action, with a shift towards a net zero carbon emissions economy by 2050” and the establishing of an independent climate commission. This would include shifting farms to “more sustainable land use” and a focus on transport, energy and primary industries.

See Greens, farming and “more sustainable land use”

2. Beneficaries

The welfare system will be overhauled. Specific promises include ensuring access to entitlements, removing “excessive sanctions” and reviewing Working for Families “so that everyone has a standard of living and income that enables them to live in dignity”.

3. Conservation

“Significant gains in the conservation budget.”

4. Water

Improve water quality and fund “freshwater enhancement”. Government support for irrigation will be wound down.

5. Mental health

Free counselling for under-25s and access to mental health services for everyone.

6. Special needs

Access to education for children with learning difficulties.

7. Gender pay gap

“Substantial progress” to closing the gender pay gap in the public service.

8. Students

Reducing the number of students living in hardship.

9. Refugees

Review, as well as “adequately fund and support” refugees under the family reunification scheme.

10. Drugs

A referendum on legalising the personal use of cannabis by 2020. Funding for drug and alcohol addiction services will be increased.

See Cannabis referendum could disappoint

 

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9 Comments

  1. David

     /  21st October 2017

    So despite having the balance of power the Greens are taking credit for what Labour had promised to do anyway including decriminalising dope which Ardern said she would do in the debates.
    Loosers got zilch and missed their chance to really have an impact with some innovative wins for the environment.

    Reply
  2. PDB

     /  21st October 2017

    A lot of that is so ‘wishy-washy’ it could be bugger all or it could be a decent ‘gain’.

    *A lot of ‘reviews’.
    *Stuff the National govt was already working towards.
    *Stuff Labour had already promised on the campaign trail.
    *Reducing the number of students living in hardship – 1,2, 50?
    *“Significant gains in the conservation budget.” – um….conservation was one of the govt depts Labour had allocated no extra spending after year one (ala the ‘fiscal hole’).

    Reply
    • Blazer

       /  21st October 2017

      a good reason National is…gone..’Stuff the National govt was already working towards.’…slow learners ,who belatedly recognise issues ,years too late.Reactive rather than pro-active describes National to a T.

      Reply
    • National used reviews to fob off.

      Reply
  3. I had a discussion where it was suggested that dope and drug testing for employees should be canned, “because we’re so close to decriminalising it anyway.” However, they answered No when asked would they drive with a colleague on drugs.
    Re the policy, legalise drugs and increase funding for addiction services. Such twisted thinking, my head is spinning.
    So can’t understand how that can be called Progressive (another stolen word).

    Reply
    • Better resources for reducing addiction, helped by less pressure from drug pushers to keep the addictions ticking over their business.

      Reply
    • Gezza

       /  21st October 2017

      I had a discussion where it was suggested that dope and drug testing for employees should be canned, “because we’re so close to decriminalising it anyway.” However, they answered No when asked would they drive with a colleague on drugs.

      Just out of interest, how did they react when you asked if they’d drive with a colleague who was a bit pissed, & whether they were in favour of introducing alcohol testing at work? Or did that not come up?

      Reply
      • Fair question, it didn’t come up. I suspect the answer would be the same.
        The use of either substance, while a personal choice, has the potential to result in the harm of others. Like so many other laws, the issue is where do you draw the line between personal freedom and collective responsibility.

        Reply

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