A positive new Parliament

After the swearing in of the new Government today we will have a popular but untested Prime Minister, and an experienced and respected leader of the Opposition who also looks to be stable and has a record now of reasonably successful campaigning.

Ardern tries to be relentlessly positive, a good attribute for the leader of a fresh new Cabinet. If it transfers into her performance and the performance of her government then it will be good for the country.

Even most of those who didn’t vote for one of the governing parties will accept the democratically formed new government and give them a fair go.

Bill English is also trying to sound positive in the wake of a disappointing outcome. It’s important that he continues to be mostly positive, for the good of his party. It will also potentially substantially increase the impact when he or his colleagues find good reason to hold the Government to account.

I think that most of what the incoming Government has indicated it wants to do will have wide public support as long as they don’t overreach and things change relatively smoothly.

With the country in a reasonable state and positioned to do well, and with a positive Prime Minister and a positive leader of the Opposition, there is good reason to be positive about the future of the country.

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55 Comments

  1. Alloytoo

     /  26th October 2017

    The deputy PM has already told us we’re due for an economic collapse……I think its naive to think that Ardern will set the tone in isolation .

    Reply
  2. High Flying Duck

     /  26th October 2017

    Didn’t the positivity desert Jacinda as soon as the election was over?
    Suddenly there was despair in the regions, The well performing economy became the dismal failure of capitalism with the economy ready to tank…
    Jacinda was also certain cabinet would definitely not be expanded to cater for 3 parties – until she expanded cabinet.
    The handbrakes on the economy are already starting to be foreshadowed – tax cuts gone, compulsory wage increases, fuel taxes. This guarantees inflation and lower economic activity.
    She is going to be seen as very prescient when the economic good news suddenly disappears through no fault of Labour policies…

    Reply
    • Blazer

       /  26th October 2017

      One thing you can bet on…National will be relentlessly ..negative in opposition.English is the only one with any respect or grasp of the economy.Joyce’s reputation is unredeemable.Bennett is clueless and the rest have no gravitas,at all either.

      Reply
      • High Flying Duck

         /  26th October 2017

        Joyce yesterday reiterated his view the fiscal hole will be shown to be true.
        Time will tell.

        Reply
        • Blazer

           /  26th October 2017

          Joyce’s 11.7 billion hole will never be ‘true’.

          Reply
          • High Flying Duck

             /  26th October 2017

            Wait and see, This Government looks full of holes to me. It won’t take long to add up.

            Reply
          • Trevors_elbow

             /  26th October 2017

            No it wont because taxes will rise to fill it….
            Just as well.your filthy rich ah Blazer… wont mean a thing to you…. but it will to all working kiwis…

            Reply
        • robertguyton

           /  26th October 2017

          Joyce? The same Joyce featured in the $600 000 copywrite court case?
          That Joyce?
          Saw this yesterday:
          “”Well, Steven Joyce’s post-political career options are narrowing all the time. Dildo-catcher is a no-go. Giant hole locator is also out. And now copyright specialist is off the table.”

          Reply
      • barryglik

         /  26th October 2017

        True National hates being in opposition “the natural Government” we are etc. Agree also negativity has in the past been Nationals forte with regards retaking office. Minority bashing, appealing to majority “preferences” muck raking and the usual lashings of promises seems to be enough to turn Labour over. Now though Labour has a paper thin MMP majority so National may be able to breeze to victory with a much softer approach. Joyce I think was brilliant in the way he responded to questions always giving a short, slick response looking down on the interviewers with his “I can’t believe you are even asking me this look” 🙂
        Labour could do with a Joyce like deflector in the front line 🙂 Mean while Mr Peters has begun his own exit strategy by proclaiming that any future problems can not be sheeted back to himself or the Government he has shaped. Sir Winston, the next Governor General UN posting. All on the bucket list. The old rascal 🙂

        Reply
  3. barryglik

     /  26th October 2017

    As a centre left supporter I am still in shock about Labour’s 36% ” win”. Probably as shocked as National supporters are about their 46% “loss”. For me the election was “won” or more accurately “decided” during the post election MMP negotiation. For me this is a Winston Peters government right now and how this all plays out over the next 3 years will interesting. Not saying Labour is on thin ice but when your major backer is the mercurial Mr Peters this marriage of convenience could quickly become inconvenient. Mind you National combined with their most unlikely partner i:e the Maori party for years so convenience can work and work well.

    Reply
    • NOEL

       /  26th October 2017

      Catch up of course it was decided. Its MMP. And the next election will be under MMP and the next after. What’s happened this time apart from party percentages is the same as all previous MMP elections.

      Reply
  4. barryglik

     /  26th October 2017

    You describe Ardern as being popular and untested. Well untested is very true. Popular? Among Labour and the Greens supporters probably. Among National and NZF supporters probably not 🙂 Risen with out a trace is a tad churlish I know but with out the miracle intervention of Mr Peters the 36% Jacinda Adern would be Jacinda who? already. Winter 2019 might be a better time to assess the new PM’s ” popularity”.

    Reply
  5. robertguyton

     /  26th October 2017

    Jacinda is clearly and demonstratively popular and her popularity will increase as time goes by. Already she’s winning plaudits for her handling of every detail of managing the coalition talks, establishing a Government and handling the media. As for her being un-tested, you’d have to been in a coma to have missed the testing that’s gone on already for Jacinda – defeating the National Party at an election must surely qualify as a “test” I’d have thought; brokering a deal with Winston Peters – a test, yes, as well as gathering up The Greens, a test? I’m sure, barry, when you lose your churlishness, you’ll see that Jacinda Ardern is the bees-knees and you too will be enarmoured, along with the rest of the country. Tribal Nats will forever denigrate her, for her teeth, her womb, whatever the next Farrar-fed attack meme is, but you don’t have to behave like that, do you?

    Reply
    • Jacinda represents the populist game show, bachelorette, Apprentice type of escalation. Remember the policies and leaders of her party hadn’t been above 26% for years until she showed her hand. Once people see past her “front” and she has to start putting out fires and actually achieve her promises some will wake up

      Charm is as charm does and I think her lack of performance or achievement in the last 9 years speaks more about her than magazine covers and gushing adjectives.

      Reply
      • Blazer

         /  26th October 2017

        as outlined by Robert,Ardern has met every challenge,including being informed and articulate,sure footed dealing with media and in debates with Nationals pinup boy and perennial loser..English.

        Reply
        • High Flying Duck

           /  26th October 2017

          You could argue everyone thought English was on a hiding and was written off as a possible election winner and yet came far closer than expected against Ardern.
          But I agree Ardern has surprised on the upside in terms of being sure footed.
          Policy has been her weak point so far, but she has the opportunity to rectify that over the next few months.
          It looks like TPP is the first big back down – she’ll be signing it. Pike River will be next.

          Reply
          • Blazer

             /  26th October 2017

            she will sign it on variation of conditions that are in NZ’s favour.As opposed to the Groser line of ..line up the dead rats,we will swallow them ..all,apparantly because we are ..’suckers’..I mean have an ‘open’ economy.

            Reply
            • High Flying Duck

               /  26th October 2017

              She has said she will try to renegotiate, but she will sign it as is.

      • duperez

         /  26th October 2017

        What Jacinda Ardern represents is up to who’s telling the story. The same as the voices and what they say on here I’d suggest.

        Reply
    • PDB

       /  26th October 2017

      No doubt she has done extremely well considering she was parachuted in at the last moment but she still remains untested – giving Winston far more ‘wins’ than National to secure govt is hardly an endorsement of any sort of strong leadership, the Greens are but doormats happy with anything they can get (as you yourself display) so no challenge getting them onboard either.

      Going to the people with dodgy tax policy and then back-flipping on her tax ‘captains call’ cost the Labour party votes as well & saw her slip behind English as most preferred PM in the last polls prior to the election.

      She does show promise though.

      Reply
      • robertguyton

         /  26th October 2017

        PDB – are you going to grizzle, snipe, whine and wheedle about the Government every day for as long as they are in power, or will you take the occasional day off to build up your strength? You are relentlessly negative, making you, I suppose, the perfect opposition and a perfect match for National, who are, as you’re beginning to accept, in OPPOSITION and will be, no doubt and going by past behaviour, relentlessly negative and will grizzle, snipe, whine and wheedle about the Government (Jacinda-led Government) ad nauseum.
        Just askin’

        Reply
        • PDB

           /  26th October 2017

          You’re too thin skinned Robert, and rather hypocritical considering all you have done is complain about the past National govt. What you are really aying is no one can criticize the left but the right is fair game. I even said Ardern ‘shows promise’ and has ‘done extremely well’.

          Feel free to critique where I’m wrong above. Winston is pulling the strings of the new govt (look at how he demanded the Greens stay away from the main table – has he even spoken to Shaw yet?) and her ‘tests’ are yet to come.

          Reply
          • robertguyton

             /  26th October 2017

            ” Winston is pulling the strings of the new govt (look at how he demanded the Greens stay away from the main table – has he even spoken to Shaw yet?)”
            PDB – your speculations are not facts. Where you present facts, I will “feel free to critique” but as most of what you say falls into the “reckons” catagory, there’ little for me to go on. As for criticising National – who? Oh, t those has-beens! 🙂

            Reply
        • RG. When will you simply critique argument without getting personal.

          Some of us here absolutely despise everything about this cobbled together, disparate government; no doubt how others felt about Key. There was no holding back on criticism then was there!

          Stop admonishing individuals and argue the points – criticise public figures but leave posters out of it please

          Reply
          • Blazer

             /  26th October 2017

            perhaps you can take solace or even rejoice in the comments of many National supporters who said they wanted to be in opposition this time…anyway.

            Reply
          • robertguyton

             /  26th October 2017

            “Some of us here absolutely despise everything about this cobbled together, disparate government”
            Ah, do you now! What a sad state of affairs for “some of us here” then, isn’t it. Condemning a Government before it even gets on its feet. Admirable, traveller and bound to disappoint. Why would anyone want to engage in discussion with you, knowing that you “despise” the people under discussion? Holding a Government’s feet to the fire as they go about their business is fair enough, and National had their held that way for 9 years, but you’ve started before this lot is out of the blocks and declared your intransigence right from the get-go. It’s called prejudice, a closed mind, whatever. In any case, it’s boring.

            Reply
            • Anyone here knows I’ve not got a closed mind. I’m passionate about life and politics , however I don’t do personal abuse. I’m no better than you, you’re no better than me but surely people can agree to differ without resorting to personal invective.

              The Government is a public entity. In one iteration or another, they have stewardship of millions of dollars of mine and my families over the years. They also have duty and care to provide for all invested in our society.

              They’re fair game – posters are not!

            • robertguyton

               /  26th October 2017

              I don’t do “invective” or “personal abuse” either, but I do tease; perhaps it’s received differently than I intend. I’ll desist.

  6. alloytoo

     /  26th October 2017

    Oh well, new taxes have already been announced…..that’s positive

    Reply
  7. Alan Wilkinson

     /  26th October 2017

    Disillusionment begins:

    Auckland motorists are threatening to fill up out of town, and even leave the city, to avoid a new regional petrol tax expected to be 10c a litre.

    Comments flowing into the New Zealand Herald newsdesk this morning are running heavily against the new tax, planned by the new Labour-led Government to help fund light rail to the airport and other transport projects.

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11936852&ref=rss

    Reply
    • Blazer

       /  26th October 2017

      tell them to..go for it.Selfish,greedy individuals.

      Reply
      • High Flying Duck

         /  26th October 2017

        Taxing the many to benefit the few.
        South Auckland workers are going to be taxed to provide transport to international travelers who stay in the CBD!

        Reply
        • Blazer

           /  26th October 2017

          all Aucklanders are in this together…hard for ,the every man for himself ,mindset of some..I know.

          Reply
          • High Flying Duck

             /  26th October 2017

            All Aucklanders are being dragged in for infrastructure that will benefit only a few. No “together” about it.

            Reply
            • Blazer

               /  26th October 2017

              name any recent infrastructure that benefits all taxpayers at the same level.You can’t ,can you?

            • High Flying Duck

               /  26th October 2017

              This one in particular taxes the poor and benefits the better off.
              Fuel taxes disproportionately affect those who cannot live close to the city and those who have to travel further to get to work.
              The infrastructure benefits are going to go to airport travelers who are disproportionately better off.

            • Blazer

               /  26th October 2017

              @HFD…a large number of poor cannot afford cars and rely on public transport.wealthier folk would not be seen dead on a bus/train/tram.As you know Tourism is our biggest earner and Auck Int is the main gateway.Occupations that require un or semi skilled labour are concentrated in dormitory suburbs.The inner city is the domain of paper shufflers who reside in adjacent leafy suburbs.

            • High Flying Duck

               /  26th October 2017

              It’s the working poor and those trying to get ahead who will suffer. Beneficiaries and those without cars will not care so much.
              Contractors, tradies, couriers, cleaners and anyone in the East and North will be made to suffer for no benefit.
              If the inner city is the domain of paper shufflers, why are they so hell bent on spending billions of dollars tramming and training so many people in to and out of the city?

            • Blazer

               /  26th October 2017

              the City is one destination along the line.There are numerous suburbs on the track to the Airport.Please outline exactly how the people you mention will…suffer’?

            • High Flying Duck

               /  26th October 2017

              They are all people who cannot use public transport and who have to travel extensively as part of their jobs.

            • High Flying Duck

               /  26th October 2017

              East & North are ignored for transport spending in the short to medium term.

            • Blazer

               /  26th October 2017

              as you know with transport and negelected infrastructure..you cannot please everyone.

        • Blazer

           /  26th October 2017

          Travel from West to East Auckland and you can easily find a 20c per litre variation in prices,any day of the…week.

          Reply
    • PDB

       /  26th October 2017

      Light rail to the airport! How many people does this benefit when the new tunnel is still likely to be the faster, and more convenient (in terms of carrying baggage etc) method of getting to the airport and back to the CBD. How does this benefit people from West, East, North & South Auckland?

      Reply
      • I’ll still take my car, drive into Flypark, scan my CC and get the shuttle to terminal.

        Far, far easier than taxiing to a train station

        Reply
      • Blazer

         /  26th October 2017

        as if National cared ,how many people benefited from turning NZ into a tax haven,or making Thiel a citizen,or paying a Saudi Sheik $11mil plus.Most modern cities have rail links to their major airports.Its a no brainer.

        Reply
        • Ones with 1.5 million in one of the largest urban areas in the world with a majority well outside the bounds of the proposed light rail?

          Reply
    • Patzcuaro

       /  26th October 2017

      Filling up just outside the fuel tax is normal human behaviour. New petrol stations may go in just outside the fuel tax area again normal market behaviour.

      Reply
      • I have that opportunity often enough and will avail myself

        Reply
        • Blazer

           /  26th October 2017

          don’t forget your Pak’n Save…docket!

          Reply
        • Blazer

           /  26th October 2017

          I suggest you are more bitter than most because, you confided that insiders had lead you to believe the man you now despise with a passion was going with National,and that did not..eventuate.

          Reply
    • Corky

       /  26th October 2017

      Let the rot begin as the Phoenix arises from the ashes.

      Reply
    • Fight4NZ

       /  26th October 2017

      “even leave the city, to avoid a new regional petrol tax”
      The positive face of unintended consequences. That will free up housing and save millions.

      Reply
      • Blazer

         /  26th October 2017

        its an oh so feeble argument.Travel from West to East Auckland and you can easily find a 20c per litre variation in prices,any day of the…week.

        Reply

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