Tracking progress of the new Government

Stuff has launched a website to try to keep track of what the new Government is doing.

They explain The First Draft: Tracking the start of a Government

Jacinda Ardern has been anointed the world’s 13th most powerful woman.

Construction of a motorway has been scrapped.

Students are enrolling for free tertiary education next year and foreigners have a couple of months left to buy existing New Zealand homes.

In the rush of the modern news cycle, it can be difficult to decipher the really important stuff. Or to review the progress of a Government over any given week, let alone month or year.

Stuff is experimenting with a new platform to try to untangle the muddle. Today, we’re launching The First Draft, a project tracking the early days of the Ardern administration.

The concept is simple: we’ll highlight key events with short pieces of analysis, fact-checking and data-based reporting. The posts will only be available to view via The First Draft. You’ll be able to scroll back over a preview of every post to simply review some of the most important developments.

The First Draft link:

 

17 Comments

  1. David

     /  November 3, 2017

    Ardern may need this to keep track of her ministers pronouncements.

  2. PDB

     /  November 3, 2017

    They are doing one for the economy under the new govt as well, here is the projection;

  3. Alan Wilkinson

     /  November 3, 2017

    Here’s a radical idea for the political-bureaucratic fuckwits wrecking the housing supply:

    How about making the people doing the building and development responsible for it, instead of useless councils?:
    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/business/news/article.cfm?c_id=3&objectid=11939992

    Nah, that would never work. We’ve got socialists in power.

    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  November 3, 2017

      I’ve just seen a classic illustration of the consequences of our moronic political response to the leaky building problem. A house is up for sale built at the time and with the materials of concern. Buyers won’t touch it which illustrates my comments that the only intervention in the market necessary to stop them being built was to make the problems widely known. Instead we’ve wrecked the housing supply by making Councils and bureaucrats responsible for durability and quality.

      However it gets worse. The seller commissioned a report to find out if there were any actual reasons for concern. Now in the real world that would have been an investigation to find and resolve any significant issues as efficiently and cost-effectively as possible. But that real world has been sucked into the bureaucratic quagmire and now the main concern is butt-protection rather than problem solving. Accordingly, the report is a masterpiece of micro-managing, searching for every possible imperfection and suggesting further work everywhere to investigate, fix or replace. All that after observing that the house appears to have been well built to good standards and in a normal state of repair for its age.

      So what appears to be a perfectly good house probably needing a touch up and paint soon is left in the bureaucratic limbo of failing to achieve perfection and therefore being condemned as useless. Madness.

      • Gezza

         /  November 3, 2017

        Calm down. Just offer them bugger-all because of “all the work” you’ll have to do Sir Alan.

        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  November 3, 2017

          Not for me, Sir Gerald. We’ll see what happens.

  4. Alan Wilkinson

     /  November 3, 2017

    Just noticed an interesting point. The Government thinks it has been smart in supposedly banning residential property sales to foreigners via the OIA mechanism – but this could easily come back to bite them. The OIA panel may well find no significant problem with selling a house to a foreign resident – for example to house family members. Then the Minister would have to overturn the OIA decision. And the purchaser could take him to court for abusing the OIA process and purpose.

    • Gezza

       /  November 3, 2017

      OIA? or OIO? Somebody should just email the responsible Minister a link to your comment. (c, interested?) I’m sure there’ll be a fix.

    • Blazer

       /  November 3, 2017

      your example fails…they just give the bugs bunny to family residents…too easy.

      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  November 3, 2017

        Of course there are various obvious ways to circumvent it altogether as well tackling it head on. The whole thing is just posturing for xenophobic ignoramuses.

  5. I think there’s room for an alternate source

    • Gezza

       /  November 3, 2017

      Who did you have in mind & are they in favour of MMP?

  6. robertguyton

     /  November 3, 2017

    Bill English is going to wreck the new Government with his big, powerful, All Black dominance in the select committees. He says. He blows.
    Opinions differ as to just how pathetic Bill’s claims are, but AB says it straight:
    “It’s bluster from Bill – he’s pretending that there is something special/different that being the biggest single party gives him that previous oppositions haven’t had.
    It’s nonsense, it gives him nothing special. They are still going to lose the important votes in the house.
    He’s an unpleasant little fellow. A punitive, Victorian moraliser who clearly loathes losing to parties backed by those unimportant people who are at the wrong end of the natural, God-given social and economic hierarchy.”