General chat

“Is there any way we could have a thread for the more lightweight stuff like music and general chat?”

Do it here. Please no personal attacks or bickering. Anything abusive, provocative or inflammatory may be deleted.

37 Comments

  1. Gezza

     /  November 12, 2017

    Theme for the movie Speedgate ( when someone gets around to making it)

  2. Pickled Possum

     /  November 12, 2017

    Any body grown a Jabutacaba tree. I have afew young treelings.

    • Wow. How weird and wonderful. I’d love one. Not right now unless you abosutely have to get rid of. I need to get a protected area going in my new place first. I’m planning on doing a organic Hugelkutur Potager type place, but I need to get it all stock fenced Etc. I could swap you some pedestrian Strawberry Guava. I’ve got heaps that have seeded in my urban section PP. they have lovely bark, yummy berries for juice and jelly Etc.

      Pretty berries

      Has a lovely form


      Bark is lovely. Remind me of an Arbutus

  3. I stopped the mower, but the wheels were still spinning enough to cut the cord in two. How annoying. I will have to buy another one, as two new plugs* cost more than a new cord and I can’t reuse the existing ones (I was going to shift the one from the shorter piece to the other one)

    This seems all wrong, somehow. A good cord going to waste…

    * ONE (!) plug costs about $3 less than a cord (a heavy duty one)

    • Gezza

       /  November 12, 2017

      Ok, but let’s face it, the solution to this problem is to not cut the cord & have to moan about the ineqalidy of the resulting situation afterwards.

      • Kitty Catkin

         /  November 12, 2017

        My point is that it seems all wrong that a cord would cost more to mend than a new one costs to buy…it’s like printers’ ink cartrdges costing more to buy than a new printer does. What waste.

    • Get a boy in Kitty!

      • Kitty Catkin

         /  November 12, 2017

        Well, I could, but it costs quite a bit for someone to mow a lawn, it’s good exercise-and I have never cut an moa or weedeater cord before. It must be 10 years since we bought the first moa here, and we had one for a little while years ago. So I suppose that it was bound to happen some time. The annoying thing is that I donated a similar cord to the op shop fairly recently…

        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  November 12, 2017

          Chances is are you could find a screw on plug you could cut off on some appliance at the local recycling centre, Kitty. Then you would only need to buy a socket connector to rejoin your cable.

  4. Pickled Possum

     /  November 12, 2017

    Yaaa Arbutus, A Strawberry Tree. I found one in the bush, where there used to be an old homestead. I had never seen or heard of one before. This one was absolutely loaded,and the most beautiful thing to see strawberries hanging of branches. The possums never desecrated it.
    .
    The Jabutacaba tastes like grapes. They belong to the Myrtaceae family species P.cauliflora . The mother tree the sapling come from has got little cauliflower growths on the trunk ATM. I had a feed last year. YUMMI.

    I would love a Strawberry Guava. Are those the big ones from SA?. I remember Mum giving us canned ones. big pink delish guavas. Next winter planting time … swaps-sees. 8-0

    I am going to do a Hugelkutur bed. Got some rotten wood. Sounds really interesting. No watering or fertilising.

    • Gezza

       /  November 12, 2017

      I’d never heard of them, here’s short video showing size & how to eat.

      • Gezza

         /  November 12, 2017
        • Pickled Possum

           /  November 12, 2017

          Jez Gez Is that rubbish all over the ground, in that vid … there in Florida.America
          Here’s a better vid .. just turn the sound down.

          • Gezza

             /  November 12, 2017

            Short shelf-life, you need to eat it in three days or it ferments I heard.
            Interesting for you that it has therapeutic uses too, Possum?
            How many are you putting in?

            • Pickled Possum

               /  November 12, 2017

              yep short life … long hours making jam juices red wine?
              Heeps for the birds, big plus. Hope they can get in to get them.
              Everything fresh, spray free, organically grown is therapeutic.
              Putting in 2 and gonna keep 1 for trav and bonsai 1.

            • Pickled Possum

               /  November 12, 2017

              Bonsai Jabuticaba

  5. No. They’re the small ones. Birds love them

  6. Gezza

     /  November 12, 2017

    Was just hanging out a bit of washing in the covered patio here & noticed the wall of birdsong going on. It’s late evening, the sun’s just gone down behind the Western Hills, it’s still light, but it’ll be dark in about 30 mins. It just struck me. I’m often up early enuf to catch the first bird solo of the Dawn Chorus at 4.30 am, & the whole choir’s usually in full swing by 5 am.

    But I have noticed lately that there’s an equivalent Evening Chorus here – that’s just as busy, as loud, & as lively as the morning one. Anybody else get that?

    • robertguyton

       /  November 12, 2017

      Yes, Gezza, our forest garden is a symphony at dusk. The talk is different though, from that of the dawn chorus; at dawn, hope, praise, joy and promise, at dusk, summation, completion, resignation even. It fascinates me, all this korero manu.

      • Gezza

         /  November 12, 2017

        Same Robert. There are a lot of birds who visit my place regularly. Many are common species like sparrows, thrushes, blackbirds – and it seems they’re the same birds. Because of all the time I’ve spent talking to my ducks and pukekos I’ve started chatting to these birds. They’re fascinated at being talked to. They’ll stop what they’re doing – listen – chirp back sometimes. They’re intelligent & curious, most birds, from what I can see.

        • Gezza

           /  November 12, 2017

          My pukekos are interesting. They have a limited range of sounds & when I first started trying to attract them (they will be forever wary, unlike the ducks, which get quite tame and trusting quickly) I would do my best to imitate their frequency – I’d speak or repeat their sounds at a high pitch. But when I played back video clips I’d recorded I sounded like a eunuch so I didn’t like to flick them around friends & family sounding like that. I therefore lowered my korero to my normal speaking voice pitch. I notice now that when the pooks do bother to respond to me, they do it at a lower pitch than they used to, all 3 of them.

          • robertguyton

             /  November 12, 2017

            A touch of Dr Doolittle in your DNA, Gezza?
            I’ve long been fascinated by the 3-dimensional nature of birdiness: the way they bisect space effortlessly, making us terrestrial humans seem plodders.
            I once read that without birdsong, there’d be no opening of the blossoms; they sing them into opening, apparently. As well, it’s thought that stomata open in response to birdsong; imagine if we lost all birds and the stomata theory turned out to be true – aue te mamae! Do sound-mimicking birds carry echoes of extinct birdsong, passed on generation to generation? Can someone with a finely-tuned ear hear the call of the huia in te tangi o nga tuuii?

            • Gezza

               /  November 12, 2017

              The one thing that struck me most about the pukekos is the way they walk. It’s very human-like. They stroll. Very carefully. And they will also run if for example I throw some wheat into the garden, they’ll run up to it. They prefer to walk rather than fly, which they do clumsily. That, and their adaptability, the way they handle all the different foods they eat, their beaks are multi-purpose, scissors, shears, tweezers, secateurs, & daggers. They are incredibly strong, if they want to pull some plant out and very dextrous with their feet. You can’t miss the raptor dinsoaur lineage in these birds.

            • Gezza

               /  November 12, 2017

              Do sound-mimicking birds carry echoes of extinct birdsong, passed on generation to generation? Can someone with a finely-tuned ear hear the call of the huia in te tangi o nga tuuii?
              That’s an interesting question. I don’t know the answer. I hear similarities in the songs of the bellbird and the tui. But the dawn choruses I listen to and have sometimes recorded produce such an incredible array of completely different songs it’s hard to conceive of them all having evolved from the song of the same ancestor.

            • Pickled Possum

               /  November 12, 2017

              RG

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  November 12, 2017

              Have you seen this story, G? Calls are not the only way birds communicate:
              https://www.sciencenews.org/article/crested-pigeons-sound-alarm-their-wings

            • robertguyton

               /  November 12, 2017

              Cheers, pp.
              I notice blackbirds pipe a single note as they are about to fly around a corner or through a “passage” in close plantings: is that a warning to other birds coming the other way or a sonar-like peep that tells them the way is clear? I don’t know yet.

            • Gezza

               /  November 12, 2017

              This is Fledgy. His flying efforts were pretty crap but he was a great talker.

              His flying’s improved now too. Just needed longer tail feathers. He’s bigger than mum n dad. I don’t think they’ve noticed he can probably feed himself now. He’s still very demanding…

            • Gezza

               /  November 12, 2017

              @ Alan – that’s interesting. The ducks have a whole set of non-verbal behaviours to communicate with other ducks. Mostly its warnings or indicating agitation. Momma ducks have specific quacks for the ducklings to keep them from straying to far. The boys don’t listen of course.

              The most amazing experience I’ve had with bird wings is Charlie flying straight up in the air about a foot away from my face and over top of me to land. The blast of displaced air from his wings was phenomenal.

  7. Gezza

     /  November 12, 2017

    Spent a pleasant half communing with Ella at our little meeting spot tonite (tho this is from 5 November).

    Here’s a song for my rivershark ❤ sweetie.