Climate related trends

NASA has several interesting trend animations in their Climate Time Machine.

Carbon Dioxide

September 2002:

Time Series: 2002-2016, image #0

This time series shows global changes in the concentration and distribution of carbon dioxide since 2002 at an altitude range of 1.9 to 8 miles. The yellow-to-red regions indicate higher concentrations of CO2, while blue-to-green areas indicate lower concentrations, measured in parts per million.

December 2016:

Time Series: 2002-2016, image #171

Global Temperature

1884:

Time Series: 1884 to 2016, image #0

This color-coded map shows a progression of changing global surface temperatures since 1884. Dark blue indicates areas cooler than average. Dark red indicates areas warmer than average.

2016:

Time Series: 1884 to 2016, image #132

Arctic Sea Ice

1979:

Time Series: 1979-2017, image #0

This visualization shows the annual Arctic sea ice minimum since 1979. At the end of each summer, the sea ice cover reaches its minimum extent, leaving what is called the perennial ice cover. The area of the perennial ice has been steadily decreasing since the satellite record began in 1979

2017:

Time Series: 1979-2017, image #38

Obviously climate and it’s affects will fluctuate, and the climate is affected by more than man-made effects, but the trends and the human influence on them are a concern for the planet that needs ongoing monitoring and also mitigating efforts. The risk is too great to do nothing.

https://climate.nasa.gov/interactives/climate-time-machine

15 Comments

  1. Maggy Wassilieff

     /  November 20, 2017

    Wow Global temperatures since 1884.

    And exactly where were all those temperature recording stations in 1884, or 1900.
    https://realclimatescience.com/2017/09/the-global-temperature-record-is-a-complete-fake/

    • Gezza

       /  November 20, 2017

      (Just by the by, somewhere downstream – probably by the park – there’s hopefully still a cute little duckling of Pettygirl’s named Maggles after you.)

      • Maggy Wassilieff

         /  November 20, 2017

        Daisy and Donald are late for breakfast this morning. And Geeza is missing too….. He’s the one that tries to invade D&D’s romantic moments… but usually he’s just sits all forlorn on the lawn.
        I hope the pheasants haven’t driven them away.

        • Gezza

           /  November 20, 2017

          It’s not all wine and roses being a duck. You got eels?

          • Maggy Wassilieff

             /  November 20, 2017

            Na, I’m halfway up a hill and any respectable eel would have been tucker for the indigenes before it slithered into Dacha Maggles.
            I’ve just got kereru, kingfishers, bellbirds, tui, mallards, mynahs, magpies, ruru, fantails, silvereyes, thrush, starlings, blackbirds, sparrows, chaffinches, yellowhammers, possums, feral puddy tats, mousies and Gizzy cockroaches.

            • Gezza

               /  November 20, 2017

              Wow. I envy that bird collection. Kereru, kingfishers & yellowhammers are a rarity here. But I get little black shags & pied shags in the stream. One of the latter was cruising about down there yesterday. I’ve even come across shags a kilometre or more from the sea in streams in the bush on hikes. What province are you in?

            • Gezza

               /  November 20, 2017

              Meet Elvis. I’m hoping Maggles Duckling hasn’t met him.

            • Gezza

               /  November 20, 2017

              That’s his slow & easy speed. He’s like a torpedo when he goes after a duck that tries to get his treats!

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  November 20, 2017

              Maggy, I have most of those-not bellbirds in the garden, but there are some nearby-talk about the bird sanctuary ! Don’t you love living where these things are ? Dux fly over, as do geese and there are herons around who pass through…I have frequent visits from goldfinches, swallows and kingfishers. Other flyovers inc. hawks, plovers, spoonbills…and we had some Australian illegal immigrants, a kind of wood pigeon. There was an article in the paper once asking if people had seen them anywhere. NOT so that they could be eradicated, just wanting to know where in the Waikato these were-some were across the road, living by the flax. We were really pleased to discover what they were. There are also grey warblers around…and dear old possums. I find big wetas sometimes.

              One wet night, there was a frog spreadeagled on the glass of the front door. Too funny. As the glass is clear, I had a great view.

              Mousies…yes, those, too. I pulled the sofa out today after well, never mind how long, and there was a dead mousie there.

  2. Maggy Wassilieff

     /  November 20, 2017

    @Gezza
    Province?????
    What is this..the 1870s?

    • Gezza

       /  November 20, 2017

      Er, no. Different provinces sometimes have different birds. No mynahs in Welly, for example & I never saw a black fantail in Taranaki. Look, never mind. It’s getting pretty weird here. I’ll just rename the duckling to Maisy & let Prettygirl know. Don’t worry about.

      • Maggy Wassilieff

         /  November 20, 2017

        Crikey, the little duckling will get a complex if she gets a new name.
        Anyway… Gisborne Botanical Province, East Cape Ecological Region, Location: Titirangi/ Kaiti Hill

  3. Maggy Wassilieff

     /  November 20, 2017

    @Kittycatkin,

    I forgot to add swallows… they nest around the top of my hill and swoop around the place every now and again. I didn’t mention Australasian Harrier, coz they just fly by.
    Grey Warblers are in the “bush” reserve next door…… not an old-growth bush reserve…
    just planted up paddocks and a hillside to look pretty for the 200 yr anniversary of Cook’s landing….. (and soon it will be the 250 yr anniversary).

    Last year the neighbour had rooks nesting at the top of some giant gumtrees, but they had a visit from the exterminator.

  4. David

     /  November 20, 2017

    Why no photos of the Antarctic ice extent? Is there a reason for there strange absence?

  5. PDB

     /  November 20, 2017

    Stories like this don’t get much fanfare…

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11902412

    “It may have been warm overnight this week, but New Zealand is currently experiencing its coldest winter since 2009.

    MetService meteorologist Georgina Griffiths said not only has it been cold, the main centres have also experienced more rain than last year, with Christchurch sitting at 134 per cent of its usual rainfall at 551mm compared with 411mm.”

    As an aside October 2017 was the least sunniest October on record in Auckland.