Briefings to Incoming Ministers

The Briefings to Incoming Ministers (170+ documents) were published today:


Briefings to Incoming Ministers (BIMs) are to be made public today in one block, in another sign of the Government’s commitment to be open and transparent, State Services Minister Chris Hipkins says.

More than 170 documents will be published at midday on the Beehive website. They include BIMs for public sector agencies and Crown Entities, as well as supporting documents.

“The comprehensive release of BIMs in one go and in one place provides the public with a full picture of the issues the new government faces.

“While the documents contain a huge amount of information, we considered this to be a better approach than releasing BIMs one by one over time, which has happened in the past. It gets everything out in the open at the same time.”

“The documents reveal significant challenges, particularly in health, housing and social development. We will meet these challenges head on.

“They reinforce the need for urgent action in some areas. In our first 100 days, we’re already delivering meaningful change.”

The documents released are in the following categories:

NZ Herald: Briefings to incoming ministers: Highlights

Leave a comment

12 Comments

  1. Alan Wilkinson

     /  December 7, 2017

    Here’re the opinions of a bunch of utterly useless bureaucrats as to why they’ve spent the last two decades wrecking the housing market:
    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11955315

    Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  December 7, 2017

      … and our equally useless Labour politicians have suddenly discovered there is a supply problem after all. God help us these people are as stupid as the journalists that report them.

      Reply
      • Blazer

         /  December 7, 2017

        there is a supply problem,because overseas buyers have been scooping up all the houses…over 30,000 empty in Auckland..alone.

        Reply
        • Trevors_elbow

           /  December 7, 2017

          Proof. Got any or pulling it out your arse. Not a guess by someone and extrapolating normal empty houses being renovate etc

          Reply
          • Blazer

             /  December 7, 2017

            Al provides the proof you don’t really want…below.When you think about the increase in immigration its a phenominal percentage.

            Reply
            • Trevors_elbow

               /  December 8, 2017

              What bollocks you tout… empty houses in Als post clearly states due to death, travel and renovation. Not your implied Chinese buyers reaping cap gains…

              Your descent into low qual trilling continues a pace

        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  December 7, 2017

          Banal and dishonest as ever, Blazer repeats the long and often discredited implication that there are an excessive or unusual number of unoccupied houses in Auckland. He knows very well this is untrue but has zero interest in or respect for the truth.

          At the 2013 New Zealand Census of Population and Dwellings:
          • There were 473,451 occupied dwellings in Auckland – an increase of 33,750 dwellings
          (7.7%) since 2006. Average annual growth between 2006 and 2013 for occupied
          dwellings was 1.1 per cent – lower than the growth rate of 2001 to 2006 (2.2%).
          • The majority of occupied dwellings in Auckland were private dwellings (99.7%, or
          472,044 dwellings).
          • There was almost no change in the number of unoccupied dwellings in Auckland
          between 2006 and 2013 – an increase of 30 to a total of 33,360 across the region. This was a significantly smaller increase than the previous inter-censal period, when the number of unoccupied dwellings had increased by 3,744, or 12.7 per cent.

          7% of houses are unoccupied. Mostly due to owner travel or death, building, renovation or the process of sale.

          Reply
  2. Kitty Catkin

     /  December 7, 2017

    Who is going to read 170 documents ???

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  December 7, 2017

      MBIE’s is only 19 pages. Not very informative. I note their payroll system doesn’t meet their oen requirements for others. Probably owing to the stupidity of the management.

      Reply
    • Gezza

       /  December 7, 2017

      Pretty well anybody with an interest in Ministers’s responsibilities, or the functions, governance lines, structures & management teams of government agencies, is going to read those documents. That will include all parties, all political journos, editors, & I imagine certain blogsters.

      Reply
    • I’m not, that’s why I just posted the links so if anyone else is keen they can find them.

      NZ Herald: Briefings to incoming ministers: Highlights

      Reply
  3. The Pike River one in Justice is interesting. It says basically that for any of the options, there is low probability of success and high risk of fatalities. No wonder Mr Little wants to set up a scapegoat.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s