“We should be an independent republic”

A challenge to the new Parliament to “Seize the moment now, and begin the process of wider constitutional reform by committing to our next Head of State being the first President of the Republic of New Zealand.”

I strongly believe the time has well past for us to have severed the umbilical cord to Grandmother England.

We should be an independent republic within the Commonwealth – like India, or South Africa and the majority of other Commonwealth nations.

It is not just my Irish heritage, but more my sense of pride and confidence in our country and what it can be that is why I am so staunchly of the belief we can do so much better than continue to bend our knee to a hereditary monarch on the other side of the world.

We have consistently shown over the last thirty years or so, that we can produce many quality New Zealanders to serve as our Governor-General.

There is no reason why we could not do likewise with a non-executive President in that role, and frankly the time for change is long overdue.

So, let me conclude with a challenge to our new Parliament.

You are in the main the millenials whom will shape our future for the next generation and beyond.

Seize the moment now, and begin the process of wider constitutional reform by committing to our next Head of State being the first President of the Republic of New Zealand.

From Peter Dunne’s ‘valedictory’ address to the Victoria University of Wellington’s post-election seminar.

I agree with Dunne on this, but I’m not sure that the time is right for Parliament to address it. There seems to be a reluctance of parties to address important issues like this for fear of being unpopular with some voters.

The flag change process was, unfortunately, a political debacle. If parties couldn’t deal with that sensibly then I don’t like the chances of them properly progressing a discussion on becoming a republic in the Commonwealth.

It will take more than prompting from an outgoing old MP to get a republic discussion going, it will take a bold young leader unencumbered by an older old MP holding the balance of power.

 

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28 Comments

  1. Blazer

     /  December 7, 2017

    may as well wait until the Queen… Elizabeth R…..tips..over.

    Reply
  2. Ray

     /  December 7, 2017

    Once Charles gets the crown I imagine his handling of the job will like his namesakes (bet he doesn’t reign as Charles) will trigger the logical process to NZ becoming a republic.

    Reply
  3. PartisanZ

     /  December 7, 2017

    ‘They’, the government, and we the people, could perhaps begin by acknowledging that the process is well underway?

    Presently it seems atomized and factional, partly because it is, and partly because valuable conversations, investigations and reports are happening separately, e.g. An essentially Westminster or ‘Crown’ legal one conducted by Palmer & Butler over @ http://constitutionaotearoa.org.nz/, and a Maori conversation @ Matike Mai Aotearoa http://www.converge.org.nz/pma/iwi.htm

    We also have the report of John Key’s Constitutional Advisory Panel (CAP) @ http://www.ourconstitution.org.nz/The-Report

    This is a necessary component of our future Constitution. It must be embedded in bicultural foundations. We are the only people who can co-create them. Aotearoa New Zealand is the only place on Earth where you can be hapu iwi Maori, and be Pakeha, and be both …

    These Constitutional streams will flow separately for a time, then begin to meet and merge, swirling into a mighty river of consultation – like what happened at Waitangi on 5 & 6 February 1840 – gathering volume and clarity as our awa – no one else’s – progresses inexorably towards the fanned-out multicultural delta and its inescapable bicentennial headlands 2040 … the ocean beyond beckons … twinkling with freedom from all this iniquity …

    Reply
    • Ray

       /  December 7, 2017

      Hope so PartisanZ.
      Certainly hope it doesn’t get hijacked like the flag change debate.

      Reply
      • PartisanZ

         /  December 7, 2017

        IMHO Ray, the Flag Change debate was doomed from the start by the very worst forms of partiality, including “appointed panel” nepotism.

        CAP experienced an “attempted hijack” by ‘The Right Brigade’ – KiwiFrontLine et al – in the form of many hundreds of what the CAP report called “cloned submissions” …

        In their incessant Letters-to-the-Editor, the same people were livid about not being able to make submissions to Matike Mai, an independent iwi investigation. Go figure?

        Government funded CAP had 100 meetings around the country. Independent Matike Mai staged 252 hui.

        Hence the healthiness of separate discussions until the various parties and factions are ready to meet for meaningful, genuine, compassionate korero. The approach of 2040 will absolutely necessitate this meeting and, with luck and some more work, goodwill shall facilitate it to fruition.

        I predict Aotearoa New Zealand will eventually have the most unique and awesome Constitution on the planet, a model for many other countries, and once again take our rightful place as leaders of social policy, not followers …

        Reply
  4. NOEL

     /  December 7, 2017

    Has Dunne really thought this through. Surely the US Presidential selection system should be cause for a softly, softly approach until all the ducks are lined up.

    Reply
    • PartisanZ

       /  December 7, 2017

      Surely “non-executive President” takes care of that Noel? And Dunne hasn’t mentioned any election or appointment process for President, has he?

      IMHO there are considerable dangers – tangible and intangible – involved in waiting for all the ducks to line up on this one. Yet another healthy reason for the somewhat fractionated conversations that are happening now …

      Anyone can get involved in the Palmer/Butler Constitutional conversation … I have … and frankly the more the merrier … the more the healthier …

      Reply
    • wackAmole

       /  December 7, 2017

      “Surely the US Presidential selection system should be cause for a softly…”

      That system has worked beautifully, not least allowing a last stand defense against the many tentacled Globalist vampyre squid entrenched at the power center of the American Republic.

      Reply
  5. wackAmole

     /  December 7, 2017

    It never ceases to amaze me that one of the most successful. stable societies on the planet being democratic and capitalist, is full of haters intneding to replace it with a Third World socialist style republik.

    Is that the true failure and internal contradiction of the political philosophy, Liberalism, so tolerant that it cheerfully accomodates a parasite within it that grows to eventually liquefy and consume its host?

    Reply
  6. Zedd

     /  December 7, 2017

    sounds like Dunne is ‘still in denial’ (not in parliament) OR still trying to remain relevant; post-Politics 😀

    Reply
  7. Trevors_elbow

     /  December 7, 2017

    Aint broke dont tinker….. pity we replaced the privy council with the supreme court as welll

    Reply
    • PartisanZ

       /  December 7, 2017

      Oh it’s broke all right T_e, for whole segments of the population …

      “the time for change is long overdue” and long overdue change is now inevitable.

      We have come too far not to go further, done too much not to do more.

      Reply
  8. patupaiarehe

     /  December 7, 2017

    As Trev says, if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. An isolated island nation, with a minimal defense force, would be wise to continue to enjoy the protection of ‘Her Majesty’s military’, and that of her allies. Just saying…

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  December 7, 2017

      We seem to hsve expended a lot more time & lives fighting in their defence than they in ours, oddly enough.

      Reply
      • patupaiarehe

         /  December 8, 2017

        Which means they owe us a lot. No point in ‘writing off’ their debt, when we are on the black side of the ledger.

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  December 8, 2017

          Yeah. We saw how much they felt they owed us when they went into the EEC. I think they’re past “owing us”.

          Reply
    • PartisanZ

       /  December 8, 2017

      ” … the Westminster constitutional system as it has been implemented since 1840 does not, indeed cannot, adequately give effect to the terms of Te Tiriti.” – Matike Mai report

      Therefore …. It’s broke …

      Reply
      • patupaiarehe

         /  December 8, 2017

        Call me stupid PZ, but my understanding of ‘Te Tiriti’, is that it was supposed to afford Maori the same rights as every other ‘British subject’, and ensure that everyone was treated equally.

        Reply
        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  December 8, 2017

          That was before the Waitangi industry was launched, Patu. Now some pigs are more equal than others.

          Reply
          • Gezza

             /  December 8, 2017

            Yes, that’s what Maori realised & have been moving to address via the Tribunal.

            Reply
            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  December 8, 2017

              No, challenging sovereignty, creating new ancestral rights and demanding separate representation is not a pursuit or acceptance of equality.

            • Gezza

               /  December 8, 2017

              Well, as you know, not all rangatira signed the treaty, and there are those who did so whose understanding, & thus what they told their people it meant turned out not to be the same understanding as that of the Hobsonian British party present. Where they operated under hapu iwi Tikanga which gave them authority only with the consent of their people that was & has remained problematic.

              It is highly unlikely any or many willingly agreed to an arrangement which foresaw them losing control of their whenua, or taonga – including access to resources in their own nga rohe.

              A visit today the Waitangi Treaty grounds, & in particular to the excellent, modern, well laid out & thought out museum there was both extremely informative & reinforced my optimism that Pakeha & Maori of goodwill, fair-mindedness & respect for the tikanga, values, & good intentions that lay behind the introduction of The Treaty, will continue to prevail over the small but vocal number of stirrers, bigots & haters in working thru the complexities the Treaty created for future generations once it was abrogated almost immediately, particularly by succeeding Pakeha settler governments.

              We’re still on a journey that I prefer to view with optimism. Pakeha culture evolves whilst still maintaing its essential values and customs, & Maori culture is now doing the same.

            • patupaiarehe

               /  December 8, 2017

              You two both make very valid points. IMHO, justice, welfare, & every other government function should be ‘Colourblind’. Everyone should be treated equally. Being Maori is an identity, not a handicap, and it is insulting to anyone who shares that bloodline, for the govt to treat it as such.

            • patupaiarehe

               /  December 8, 2017

              That said, the Waitangi Tribunal is entirely necessary, to address past injustices.

  1. “We should be an independent republic” — Your NZ – NZ Conservative Coalition

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