TOP for 2020, Morgan stepping down as leader

The Opportunities Party has announced a commitment to contest the 2020 election, and have said that Gareth Morgan will step down as leader – this is a wise move, Morgan did very well at public meetings but his media performance was very mixed and won’t have helped his party’s chances in this year’s election.

Announcement:

  • Our day-to-day activity will be centered around our policy development and comms unit at HQ. We will continue to engage with the public and champion the importance of best practice policy.
  • As well, of course, we’ll be providing a TOP perspective on policy developments from the new government – Benchmarking them against TOP best practice policy.
  • We will be looking to grow ‘areas of influence’; regional groups of members and candidates working mostly autonomously to help build our follower base.

On leadership:

  • While Gareth intends to remain as Party Chairperson he will not be the political leader for the party in 2020. It has always been with great reluctance that he has put his name forward in that capacity and so has decided to remove the ambiguity and let others compete for the political leadership role. He will remain as political leader until we determine a new political leadership, most probably well before the end of 2018.

TOP’s commitment for 2020

At TOP HQ our post-election “breather” is now over and it’s time to gear up for the next election. You may have heard the announcement this morning, shedding some light on TOP’s future. We are going through some pretty significant changes, however rest assured that these are all in the interests of giving us the best chance to be successful going forward.

One of the big shifts is our intention to pass some of the responsibility on to you. We’re looking forward to developing a couple more policy areas in 2018/19 in conjunction with submissions and discussion with our party members. We had some great success with this process during the election when we developed our cannabis and alcohol policies through member submission, and we plan to continue this relationship. We also want to turn TOP into a movement, starting from the grassroots, after all, having a strong membership is the cornerstone of any organisation. So, if you feel passionate about what we are trying to achieve, feel like you can help, or want to get involved in our next batch of policy, make sure you sign up here.

TOP got 2.4% of the vote this year, 63,261. They need to get 5% to get into Parliament, unless they can get a current electorate MP to defect to them – no party has yet made it into Parliament under MMP without having a current or past MP.

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25 Comments

  1. Gezza

     /  December 14, 2017

    Gareth’s Party will still be Gareth’s party, whoever the leader is, I expect. And Gareth seems to be his own worst enemy.

  2. Corky

     /  December 14, 2017

    A new National aligned Conservative party may soak up some of their votes.

    • SleepingDog

       /  December 14, 2017

      I thought TOP was a National aligned Conservative party

    • PartisanZ

       /  December 14, 2017

      The problem a Conservative Party will have is the perennial mismatch between evidence-based policy and non-thinking, racial, classist, separatist, prejudicial enmity …

      How is tougher sentences, more police and more prisons evidence-based?

      If any of these things actually worked we’d have been rid of crime centuries ago …

      • Corky

         /  December 14, 2017

        You have gone out on a tangent…but never mind.

        ”How is tougher sentences, more police and more prisons evidence-based?”

        When people are in jail they don’t commit crime. Fact, and evidence based.

        • PartisanZ

           /  December 14, 2017

          Gosh what utter crap Corky …

          Beatings, ‘Fight-Club’, illegal cell phones, cigarette currency, intimidation & extortion, rape and sometimes murder, inside …. These are not crimes?

          Prisoners have continued to run organised crime syndicates from inside prisons …

          Beatings, ‘Fight Club’ blah blah blah … with Corrections personnel directly involved or complicit enablers … These are not crimes?

          • Corky

             /  December 14, 2017

            Not worth answering your weird semantics. Well,maybe one.

            ”Beatings, ‘Fight-Club’, illegal cell phones, cigarette currency, intimidation & extortion, rape and sometimes murder, inside …. These are not crimes?”

            No, not to the average person. They call it natural justice of the type our justice system cannot hand out. I don’t expect you to be able to get your head around
            that.

            I think your question has been well answered. I will move on now.

      • PartisanZ

         /  December 14, 2017

        Like factory-schools, our factory police, judiciary and prison systems are industrial revolution interventions to subjugate and control the lives of the Proletarian masses …

        The whole paradigm is totally worn out and long past its use-by date. Metaphorically it’s railways in the road freight age; almost non-applicable to the Precariat who drive the trucks …

      • sorethumb

         /  December 14, 2017

        Relatively homogeneous societies invest more in public goods, indicating a higher level of public altruism. For example, the degree of ethnic homogeneity correlates with the government’s share of gross domestic product as well as the average wealth of citizens. Case studies of the United States … find that multi-ethnic societies are less charitable and less able to cooperate to develop public infrastructure. … A recent multi-city study of municipal spending on public goods in the United States found that ethnically or racially diverse cities spend a smaller portion of their budgets and less per capita on public services than do the more homogeneous cities.[91]
        Salter, Frank, On Genetic Interests, p. 146

        • phantom snowflake

           /  December 14, 2017

          You have continued to promote “White Nationalism” (*cough*), racial segregation and related ideologies on this blog. There was a time when such views were influential in this nation; shit, racial segregation was practiced in shops/cinemas/pubs in Pukekohe up until the 1960s. But those days are long gone, there is no chance of establishing a “White Nation” here in Aotearoa. At this point Hungary would appear to be your best chance. (As to your “case studies”; Correlation/Causation Fallacy comes to mind.)

          • sorethumb

             /  December 14, 2017

            In March 1991, the Government Working Party on Immigration reported to Mr. Birch, the Minister of Immigration. The report recommended the adoption of a points system for the selection of immigrants with skills and money for business investment in New Zealand. The Minister called meetings with a limited selection of thirteen Maori leaders in Auckland and fourteen in Wellington to consider the report. They were mainly leaders of voluntary organizations. Few represented tribal groups. Although many speakers spoke against the immigration proposals, they were ignored. When the Minister was questioned in Parliament during the debate on the Immigration Amendment Bill, he cited all those in attendance at the Maori meetings as being ‘broadly positive’ towards his immigration scheme. This glossing over of Maori opposition is consistent with the procedure of elites generating policy from above and imposing it on the people below. The report was a fait accompli, and the Minister’s restricted discourse with Maori leaders after the fact, gave an illusion of democratic consultation. The select committee hearings on the Bill were also a charade. Of the 75 submissions made to the committee, 73 were opposed to the Bill. The two submissions in favor were made by immigration consultants, the people who earned substantial fees from processing immigration papers for clients wanting to get into New Zealand.
            Ranganui Walker

            Parr (2000) writes “[T]he views of New Zealanders are not conducive to the population of New Zealanders becoming more diversified globally.”

            From localism to globalism? New Zealand Sociology, 15(2), 304-. 335

          • sorethumb

             /  December 14, 2017

            are generous welfare states and high levels of immigration fundamentally incommensurable?

            There is a decent bit of research indicating that they may be. Robert Putnam, a political scientist at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, recently made a splash in the papers for saying that diversity has a devastating effect on trust within a community:

            “The effect of diversity is worse than had been imagined. And it’s not just that we don’t trust people who are not like us. In diverse communities, we don’t trust people who do look like us.”

            This bolsters other research finding that ethnic heterogeneity weakens support for the welfare state, such as this paper from Edward Glaeser, Alberto Alesina, and Bruce Sacerdote.

            More obviously, a generous welfare state makes each additional immigrant more expensive; taxpayers naturally then want fewer of them coming in. As we wrote in our very first post, given that even the very poor in lean, mean America are better off than those who want to emigrate there, it is hard to make a moral argument for keeping them out in order to bolster public benefits for natives.
            https://www.economist.com/blogs/freeexchange/2006/10/diversity_or_the_welfare_state

  3. High Flying Duck

     /  December 14, 2017

    Keep the whacky policies, but get rid of the whacky leader…I wonder what will happen to the whacky press secretary?

  4. Zedd

     /  December 14, 2017

    During the election campaign, there were comments that TOP were sitting in the ‘Blue-Green Gap’ between [deleted wrong use of name] & Greens; I tautoko this.

    methinks this gap could potentially become a CRACK in the [deleted] party & maybe it could split in two ?? The hard right & ‘the rest’ 😀

    • High Flying Duck

       /  December 14, 2017

      The media kept placing TOP as a potential partner for National. Their policies were far left though – often to the left of the Greens.
      It was hard to reconcile the reporting with the reality.

    • Zedd

       /  December 14, 2017

      apology PG for using a term you now seem to object to; Yes they are the National party (in OPPOSITION) a pack of sore losers

  5. Alan Wilkinson

     /  December 14, 2017

    TOP seems to be the home of simplistic weird policies implementing any one of which would be disastrous. Trying to place it on any rational line is impossible. It is a purely imaginary number.

    • Mefrostate

       /  December 14, 2017

      Please explain how their marijuana reform is “weird” and also how it would be “disastrous”. Thanks in advance.

      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  December 14, 2017

        Granted this is probably one of their less weird and disastrous policies. However, as usual the heavy hand of Government permeates the policy raising more tax creating new expenditures and seeking to control individual lives in the guise of public health and the assumption that individuals are not entitled to make their own choices.

        • PartisanZ

           /  December 14, 2017

          “I believe in some type of free market system. I just don’t think you’ll find an example of one completely free from government intervention.”
          ― Kenneth Eade, Terror on Wall Street, a Financial Metafiction Novel

          “Even Adam Smith’s “invisible hand” occasionally needs a slap on the wrist.”
          ― Bill Mech

          “Very few tyrants argued for the slavery of the masses. Instead, they argued for their right to protect the people from themselves.”
          ― A.E. Samaan

        • Mefrostate

           /  December 15, 2017

          So your initial comment should really have read: “If you’re part of the 0.5% who see the world through a strictly libertarian lens, TOP seems to be the home of simplistic weird policies implementing any one of which would be disastrous”

  6. Geoff Simmons’ resignation letter:
    https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=1835179293439081&id=1821247954832215

    I got the impression he wasn’t exactly an enthusiastic politician in the making.

    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  December 14, 2017

      I got the impression he was more of a politician than an economist.

  1. TOP for 2020, Morgan stepping down as leader — Your NZ – NZ Conservative Coalition