Societies endure only when…

“Societies endure only when they are devoted to future generations, and they collapse like the Roman Empire when the pleasures and fancies of the living usurp the inheritance of those unborn”.

 

15 Comments

  1. NOEL

     /  January 2, 2018

    Can’t see any Barbarians on the horizon.
    http://www.history.com/news/history-lists/8-reasons-why-rome-fell

  2. Alan Wilkinson

     /  January 2, 2018

    Suspect this is trite nonsense as most of the Romans were probably as concerned as ever for their children’s future. Probably had a lot more to do with the ambition and unity of the leadership.

    • Kitty Catkin

       /  January 2, 2018

      There is plenty of evidence that the Romans were as fond of their children as people are of theirs now-look at the letter from little Theon to his father.

      • Kitty Catkin

         /  January 2, 2018

        The more I read the quote at the top, the sillier it seems.

        • Agreed. Every sane person or society recognises this truism and on an individual level the care for ones own children and ambition for their future is central to our very being.

  3. PDB

     /  January 2, 2018

    Considering the many things the Romans gave us or further developed/advanced this is a load of nonsense.

    • Kitty Catkin

       /  January 2, 2018

      Indeed.

      • Kitty Catkin

         /  January 2, 2018

        I could have done without the language’s endless conjugations and declensions; Latin grammar was made by people with too much time on their hands.

  4. sorethumb

     /  January 2, 2018

    The immigration policy review in 1986 was part of a much larger agenda for change in New Zealand (Bedford 1996). It was not essentially a change in state policy with a primary focus on one region of the world, as Parr (2000:329) suggests, although clearly through the 1980s and 1990s
    immigration from countries in Asia was a highly topical issue for both politicians and the public. The attitudes of New Zealanders in the mid-1990s towards immigration may not have reflected the positive perspective on the value of diversity in our society that is contained in the Review of Immigration Policy August 1986. But this does not mean that the globalisation of immigration to New Zealand was an “unintended consequence of policy changes in 1986”. It was a deliberate strategy, based on a premise that the “infusion of new elements to New Zealand life has been of immense value to the development of this country to date and will, as a result of this Government’s review of immigration policy, become even more important in the future” (Burke 1986:330). The data on arrivals, departures, approvals, refugee flows and net migration gains and losses reported in this paper indicates that “the infusion of new elements” into New Zealand society is proceeding apace. There is no suggestion in immigration policy in 2002 that this will not “become even more important in the future”, as Burke (1986) assumed in the mid-1980s.

    …….
    There you have an illustration of a group acting unilaterally in a way that cannot be reversed (because the demographics change and opponents are pilloried); based on a false premise that the way to heaven is paved with good intentions. While all may seem well a symptom that it isn’t is the lack of trust in politicians and the news media who (essentially) sell and police opinion.

    • Kitty Catkin

       /  January 2, 2018

      We’re all immigrants or descended from immigrants in NZ.

  5. PartisanZ

     /  January 2, 2018

    The answer might be to legislate for future generations –

    https://futuregenerations.wales/about-us/future-generations-act/