Media watch – Saturday

20 January 2018

MediaWatch

Media Watch is a focus on New Zealand media, blogs and social media. You can post any items of interested related to media.

A primary aim here is to hold media to account in the political arena. A credible and questioning media is an essential part of a healthy democracy.

A general guideline – post opinion on or excerpts from and links to blog posts or comments of interest, whether they are praise, criticism, pointing out issues or sharing useful information.

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33 Comments

    • David

       /  January 20, 2018

      Quite incredible that a CNN Doctor can diagnose his heart disease without examining him, all most as super human as the psycholgists who have diagnosed all sorts of things without talking to him…lets not fuss about professional ethics.
      Imagine if Hilary was elected, probably no #girther and other insulting trash from supposedly professional news organisations.

  1. David

     /  January 20, 2018

    I think I am going to avoid all NZ media for a while as every single journalist competes to articulate the most sycophantic coverage they can muster.
    Meanwhile I think all decent people wish her all the best and are genuinely pleased for the couple there are some serious questions to be asked and not a single one has been so far. But as someone pointed out at Trump isnt being blamed for this.

    • duperez

       /  January 20, 2018

      There are some serious questions to be asked and not a single one has been so far? What are they, who are they are addressed to and how do you know they haven’t been asked?

      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  January 20, 2018

        I asked if it will be Winston or Kelvin leading the country. Haven’t seen it asked or answered.

        • Blazer

           /  January 20, 2018

          has been answered quite clearly……Winston ..pay..attention.

          • Alan Wilkinson

             /  January 20, 2018

            No. Winston will just be meeting facilitating and grandstanding. Policy decisions will still have to come from Labour.

            • Yes, any policy decisions or other significant decisions need to go through Cabinet as usual, and Labour has a clear majority there.

      • Try this one. Is our current electoral system suitable for task, can it deliver continuity or stability in NZ? Is it right when 93% do not vote for a Party, it fails to win even one electoral seat, yet it’s leader has the power to appoint a PM who knows in negotiations to form a government, but fails to reveal she will be to stepping down to prioritise a personal, potentially medical matter?

        All those who are looking at this as a win for Progressive values, feminist trendsetting or whatever, is the task of PM so disposable, so flexible, it’s duties so unimportant a 7% bigot, a shocking racist and xenophobe of the social, authoritarian far right is to lead us while the actual PM takes leave. Nowhere in my sphere of thought was the scenario of Peters in charge on the horizon.

        • Blazer

           /  January 20, 2018

          you must be really thick..in that case.You never ever heard the term ..’kingmaker’ mentioned!Your ranting does not change anything.In FPP,I doubt that a majority was ever…achieved…ever.

          • PartisanZ

             /  January 20, 2018

            Agree Blazer, while MMP can certainly be improved – perhaps as MER [Mixed Electoral Representation]? – a return to FPP would be retrograde to the point of reprobate …

            Winston has proved that his “7% bigot … shocking racist and xenophobe of the social, authoritarian far right” tendencies are highly fluid and convertible in coalition negotiations … His much vaunted Maori Seats and Anti-Smacking ‘referendums’ will in reality be about End-of-Life-Choice and Legalization of Cannabis …

            They were, after all, only election bribes to win the Right Brigade vote, rather like Roads of National Significance were election bribes to win the Road Brigade vote …

        • Gezza

           /  January 20, 2018

          Einston doesn’t have the power to appoint a PM. The National-selected Governor General did that. After being satisfied she met the criteria to form & head a legitimate, democratically elected coalition government.

          Maybe you could say Winston annointed her.

          I would describe Peters as far right. Far out, maybe. Far too dodgy, definitely.

      • David

         /  January 20, 2018

        duperez. Were you trying to get pregnant while campaigning if not do you not know how to manage your own contraception properly ?
        The job entails 70 odd hours plus a week and you have never really wanted to be PM or Labour leader or deputy leader so given your lack of ambition for the role what is going to drive you to be pretty much an absent mother or does governing the country take a back seat .
        How are you going to juggle running the country, caring for a baby and managing a cabinet that includes Twyford, Hipkins, Ron Mark and assorted loopy Greenies ?
        Some say NZ has been taken for a ride do you think its fair that the country is to be some feminist experiment, lets see if a totally inexperienced PM can also be a first time Mum without the country suffering ?

        • Gezza

           /  January 20, 2018

          We weren’t able to have kids. She has commented they needed “assistance”. She’s left it rather late, biologically speaking. I don’t blame them for not using contraception. The desire to have a child by a couple that wants one in circumstances that make it difficult trumps everything.

          • PartisanZ

             /  January 20, 2018

            Still, it’s easy to see what’s going on here, isn’t it?

            This is Rightie election campaign divination and prognostication fulfilled!
            Rightie powers of premonition and prediction ‘validated’ …

            It must all go wrong now because Righties prophesied it …

            • Gezza

               /  January 20, 2018

              I can accept a certain amount of grizzle from some folk that if she’d announced her pregnancy before the election some voters may have voted differently. But at that early time she’s in the time period she’s most likely to lose it & I can understand why no one had any right to know that.

              I’m 62 now. We got on with life after accepting we could never have our own children. But it still hurts. I may well criticise her for her leadership or decisions in the years to come, but I am never going to criticise her for this.

  2. sorethumb

     /  January 20, 2018

    Chief executive of Pango productions and former Māori Television head of sport Bailey Mackey; The Spinoff’s Ātea editor and former Mana and Rip It Up magazine former editor Leonie Hayden; and mother-of-five, producer and award-winning journalist Annabelle Lee speak to Mihingarangi Forbes about te reo Māori in broadcasting for Outspoken.
    https://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/outspoken/audio/2018628787/outspoken-te-reo

    and boy there has been a reaction
    Bailey Mackey says te Reo is “in crisis”.
    They don’t think they should have to bother with audience surveys that is institutional racism .
    Annabelle lee says she doesn’t know why Don Brash is even “given a platform”. His type is dying out and is in greater danger of dying than te reo.

    • Corky

       /  January 20, 2018

      ”His type is dying out and is in greater danger of dying than te reo.”

      Bullshit. Take taxpayer funding out of supporting te reo, and it’s dead over. It’s that simple.

      • Gezza

         /  January 20, 2018

        Prattish. Why should they take taxpayer funding out of supporting te reo Maori?

        Take taxpayer funding out of supporting te reo English & it would probably be a shambles too.

        In fact, even with tacks payer aide these daze to teach English their seem two bee heaps of semi-litter its.

        • Gezza

           /  January 20, 2018

          * seam

        • Griff

           /  January 20, 2018

          We have spent over a billion dollars supporting te reo.
          The result is less are fluent. Te reo is in terminal decline.
          The language is not fit for purpose in this century.
          Eventually it will be restricted to were it belongs.
          Museums academia and a few fringe dwellers.
          I am sure we will manage to squander a few more billion before giving up.

          • Gezza

             /  January 20, 2018

            Same with English. The result is fewer are fully competent. And this is where it belongs.

            • Griff

               /  January 20, 2018

              ROFL
              As one of your illerterates
              At my age I don’t get to blame the education system.
              Thinking my friend is not the same as conforming to arbitrary conventions on English spelling. Spelling is a rote learning skill not one based on logic, critical thinking or intelligence. I know what skills I value higher.

              Speelinngs is not weally tht importanr to ciummuncateions .

              What counts is a well constructed logical argument using supportable data from authoritative sources not the shape of the words you graft your arguments in.

              I am functionally illiterate…. like many Aspies I lack the fine motor skills to write clearly and find slowing down proof reading enough to discern individual letters difficult .
              Hence I let slip typos and often mangle the spelling of words.

              I don’t care
              I do view spelling Nazis a lower form of life.

            • Gezza

               /  January 20, 2018

              I know. I like to play with people like that.
              History’s one of my passions.
              Whch Nazis were hot on spelling?

            • Gezza

               /  January 20, 2018

              Te reo is in terminal decline.
              Possibly not. The future of the language is not yet clear. Too soon to make that opinion a certainty.

              The language is not fit for purpose in this century.
              Why not? What purpose are you talking about?

              Eventually it will be restricted to were it belongs. Museums academia and a few fringe dwellers.
              Nonsense. That’s not where it’s used now. It may never be as mainstream as English here. English is a far more developed & adaptable language. But there’s insufficient evidence for that prediction to be accepted as inevitable.

          • Griff

             /  January 20, 2018

            I made a list of points .
            Including.
            The trend .
            Cost.
            Fitness for purpose
            Results so far.

            Combining all these points I attempt to lay out a case for an eventual outcome.

            Whataboutism is not arguing.
            What about English is not a defense of Te reo .
            Try attacking one of my points or my logic in constructing a projected outcome based on the information .

            • Gezza

               /  January 20, 2018

              1. The trend is a current trend. It shows the number of speakers is declining. That does not mean its (virtual) extinction is a certainty.
              2. Cost is not a problem. Strategy is. The funding for teaching te reo Maori is not delivering improvements. There needs to be a proper, detailed evaluation of the reasons for that.
              3. Fitness for purpose. You have not defined the purpose. Therefore this is a pointless statement. And highly intelligent aspie with excellent analytical & communication skills as you are, you should know this.
              4. Results so far. See my points 1, 2 & 3.
              5. Maori is the native language of this country. It is perfectly acceptable for the government of this country to put funding into the teaching of it.

            • Griff

               /  January 20, 2018

              Edit you tried
              Trend
              http://socialreport.msd.govt.nz/cultural-identity/maori-language-speakers.html
              Current level and trends

              In the 2013 Census, 21.3 percent of all Māori reported that they could hold a conversation in Māori about everyday things. This was a decrease from 23.7 percent in 2006 and 25.2 percent in 2001. Of the 148,400 people (or 3.7 percent of the total New Zealand population) who could hold a conversation in Māori in 2013, 84.5 percent identified as Māori.

              Demographics.( from above)

              “Why not? What purpose are you talking about?”
              English allows you to communicate on the world stage.
              The subset of the world population I can communicate with even my
              rudimentary grasp of written English is immense.
              Today I have communicated with.
              A sikh at the local dairy , A professor in Bonn A research scientist in America. I have left comments on blogs that will be read by thousands around the world
              Who can you te reo with?
              20% of Maori and declining ….
              English as spoken in this country will absorb many words from te reo maori.
              Maori in its pure form is doomed to continue its decline.

            • Gezza

               /  January 20, 2018

              The purpose of Te Reo Maori is not to allow people to communicate on the world stage. Neither is Farsi, Hindi or many other languages. The UN is a world stage. They use translators.

              (Your grasp of English is not rudimentary. It is actually superior to the average, from what I’ve read of your posts. And I’ll bet you never say sumpthink when you mean something, like our PM.)

              Maori in its pure form may continue to decline. Or it may no longer remain in its pure form. That is a debate going on within te ao Maori.

              It’s one thing to analyse numbers & trends make predictions from a purely logical & statistical & even historical perspective but history is full of examples of such predictions failing because they fail to take account of other factors, including emotions, that most humans employ, & the actions of key inspiring people who refuse to accept that dire predictions based on known facts are inevitable & can mobilise support for their cause against the odds.

            • PartisanZ

               /  January 21, 2018

              Griff, how do you feel about spending taxpayers money to preserve historic sites of Maori significance, along with ‘European’ New Zealand buildings, our monuments to colonization?

              People say te reo has no usefulness or practical application. The numbers and trends don’t look good …

              There was a huge festival in Kaikohe yesterday, an alternative to the Ngapuhi Festival lost this year to Whangarei, and although I didn’t go I’d wager te reo was spoken extensively there, was practical and very applicable as a means of communication and cultural identity strengthening …

            • Griff

               /  January 21, 2018

              I have two archeological sites fenced off on my kaiwaka block.
              There are also a cravats on the beach section about disturbing archeology .
              Both of the property’s have extensive pre contact remains.
              Kaiwaka has gardens and kumara pits The beach section is an extensive stone working site along with a few scattered middens..
              I have no issue with minimizing the degradation over time and try to avoid impacting anything of significance.I have also made the effort to research what I am dealing with and the history behind the occupations

      • sorethumb

         /  January 20, 2018

        This is the thing about separation of nation and state. They are the institutionalised other. They weren’t getting interest in their programs so they demand to be added on to ours. In fact that was one of their arguments: when they got funding to set up their own stations that didn’t mean that the mainstream stations “job was over” (or similar).