Ardern at Waitangi

In the little I heard about Jacinda Ardern’s speech at Waitangi yesterday – remarkably the first time a woman has been allowed to speak on the occasion – she seems to have been thoughtful, sensible and engaging.

She said she would continue to engage over several days at Waitangi in future years. That’s fine, but she could do with remembering even the treaty toured the country.

RNZ – PM to Māori at Waitangi: hold govt to account

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has delivered an historic speech at Waitangi, standing on the porch of the whare rūnanga.

Ms Ardern delivered her speech during the formal welcome – a first for a female prime minister – touching on the future, her hopes for her child, and her hopes for the future of Crown-Māori relations.

She said she did not take lightly the privilege extended to her to speak from the porch, as a Prime Minister and as a woman. She said she was particularly proud to stand alongside the largest contingent of Māori MPs in the Labour party, and each and every one of them represented their people, she said.

 

“As a government we have been here for five days. We did not come simply for the beauty and hospitality of the North. We came because there is work to do, much mahi to do and we will only achieve what needs to be done together.

“So in this five days we have talked about education, health, employment, roads, housing. But now we must take the talk to action. This is the beginning for our government and I thank you.”

“We have to also start thinking as a nation of what extends beyond the negotiating table. That is not the end of our relationship nor is it the end of the Crown’s responsibility.

“We created the portfolio as an acknowledgement that our relationship goes beyond the negotiating table.”

“My first time here I was probably no more than 7 years old.

“My father brought his two daughters to the treaty grounds … he wanted us to learn the history of the place we were living and lucky enough to call home.

“I can’t help think of the kinds of things I would want my child to think about as they come on to these grounds and to this place. My hope is that they know this place’s history. That they know of the 28 October and the declaration of independence.

“My hope is that they would know of the history of [Waitangi] and those stories may be hard to hear but I am certain they are even harder to tell. That is our history and we must always be honest about our history.”

“I hope that they know the value of kaitiakitanga – that we have a role as guardians of our environment … and I hope they know that we value the ability to speak frankly and openly to one another – kanohi ki te kanohi – face to face.

“We should never shy away from that because if we don’t speak freely how do we change?

“If we value that about ourselves as a nation 364 days of the year, why would we not value it here at Waitangi? Speaking frankly and openly is not a sign of failure, but a sign of the health of our nation.

“I also hope that my child will know that we have the power to change and we must change.

“We as a government, we know what we have to do. We know all of the failings that we have as a nation but we won’t always know exactly how to change it.

“There will be no marae too small for us.

“So when we return in one year, in three years, I ask you to ask of us ‘what have we done?’ Ask us what we have done to improve poverty … ask us, hold us to account.

“Because one day I want to be able to tell my child that I earned the right to stand here, and only you can tell me when I have done that.”

Speaking to Morning Report, Ardern said she felt like she had been given the privilege of being a part of history.

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69 Comments

  1. robertguyton

     /  February 6, 2018

    But, Kitty, did she giggle like a netball captain, showing her teeth???
    Jacinda is doing us proud!

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  February 6, 2018

      Don’t start …
      You know what they get like …

      Reply
    • PDB

       /  February 6, 2018

      It’s a shame then that it has been National-led govts that have done far more for the treaty process in the past 30 years than Labour-led govts. Not to mention Foreshore & Seabed legislation and the 2007 raids by Clark’s govt.

      Reply
      • PDB

         /  February 6, 2018

        For example take just the last 2 govts;

        Stuff: “Despite both ruling for nine years National settled 59 claims to Labour’s 15.”

        Reply
        • PartisanZ

           /  February 6, 2018

          While there may be something in what you say PDB, we are also dealing with a process that is trans- or pan-political to some [considerable] extent …

          Claims are ‘progressing’ for protracted periods and may finalize at times not necessarily coincident with or dependent upon National or Labour being in government …

          Also, there’s a degree to which both natural justice and international jurisprudence is driving this process too …

          Today, nothing could be truer than Sir James Henare’s words [paraphrased], “we have come to far not to go further, done too much not to do more” …

          Reply
  2. David

     /  February 6, 2018

    Very hopey-changey. With added hope and change. Add a sprinkle of ‘did I mention my baby?’ Simmer for 3 years and see how it turns out.

    Reply
    • PartisanZ

       /  February 6, 2018

      And we wouldn’t want “hope and change” would we … ?

      Reply
      • David

         /  February 6, 2018

        Of course you want it, that why she is selling it to you!

        Law 45 in the rules of power;
        Promise change, but never deliver.

        Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  February 6, 2018

      Simper, you mean, David. I have never heard such a load of bum-crawling in my life. Pass the bucket.

      Was that Titewhai Harawira in the First Communion gloves, playing handies with Jacinda ?

      Reply
      • phantom snowflake

         /  February 6, 2018

        Tsk tsk Kitty Cat! Such a Sourpuss hehe. You continue to attack Jacinda Ardern’s sincerity. I can tell you that I have two young relatives at Western Springs College, a school which she has had a lot of involvement with, and the kids love her! They’re sharp, and would smell BS a mile off. Hell, I even like her, and I’m someone who’s unlikely ever to vote Labour. You are charged with the heinous crime of Political Tribalism, of being unable to see that the ‘other’ tribe could have any redeeming qualities. If convicted you will be sentenced to be summarily declawed, and to spend a week with John Key the shallow poll-driven populist with dollar signs instead of eyes. Away with you!

        Reply
        • robertguyton

           /  February 6, 2018

          It’s only fair.

          Reply
          • I am not convinced that children are automatically experts at detecting motivation in adults-their life experience is too limited for this to be the case. Look at the things that children believe, like Santa and the Tooth Fairy.

            Jacinda is playing to the gallery, and it’s obvious.

            The problem with being everyone’s friend will be when the friend does things that her new best friends don’t like. Familiarity breeds contempt. She is the PM and as such should comport herself with dignity, not be one of the girls. Her obvious attempts to gain Maori votes are incredibly unsubtle.

            I would love to spend a week with John Key-he seems a most interesting man and not at all what you have described him as. If he was, he would not have been an MP, never mind a PM. Did you know that he donated his salary to charity ? ( MPs must take the salary by law and, contrary to what some people think, have no say in this or in how much it is) Being in Parliament must have cost him an enormous amount of money-even if he had kept the salary, he would have been taking a massive drop in income.

            I wonder how many Labour MPs donate their salaries-many National ones have.

            Reply
            • phantom snowflake

               /  February 6, 2018

              But..but the Tooth Fairy must be real. It’s a Capitalist Archetype!

            • “I wonder how many Labour MPs donate their salaries-many National ones have.”

              That’d be zero as the salary they receive is way beyond their wiildest dreams pay grade. The main reason they have such leadership squabbles. 😛

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  February 7, 2018

              There was a saying that being an MP meant a salary rise for Labour MPs and a salary drop for Labour ones. I only know one MP, later a Minister, for whom it was a rise. She was not Labour, as it happened.

          • Blazer

             /  February 7, 2018

            a big ‘PR’ lie perpetuated by the media…John Key donated a ‘PORTION'(undisclosed ,could be $5) of his salary to charity.As do countless….others.

            Reply
            • Blazer

               /  February 7, 2018

              ‘“I wonder how many Labour MPs donate their salaries-many National ones have.’…name the National ones that have….bet you can’t.Make it up as you go…in true blue..style.

            • It is not a lie

            • Blazer

               /  February 7, 2018

              it is a lie.Became urban folklore ,but a lie…nevertheless.

            • phantom snowflake

               /  February 7, 2018

              Blazer we might have to defer to traveller on this one, she would know, being part of John Key’s inner circle who used to dine with he and Bronagh at the ‘Ponytail Cafe.’

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  February 7, 2018

              Blazer is very quick to call people liars, isn’t he ?

              He will never believe that other people might be right about something that he doesn’t want to believe.

              ‘used to dine with he ‘ ?

  3. PartisanZ

     /  February 6, 2018

    How many people know what its like to be 60 years old and still feel 40? Or be 40 and still feel 20? Things have changed but you don’t realize it …

    “As for Clark Gable [Gayford], he told us tomorrow is another day. He was wrong. The new day is today. We’re in it now.”

    ‘Simon Wilson: Something has changed at Waitangi’ – NZHerald

    From the mists of injustice, protest, activism, claim, redress and reconciliation … the shape of our post-grievance future begins to emerge ….

    Reply
    • David

       /  February 6, 2018

      It’s like the dawn of a new age.

      Reply
      • PartisanZ

         /  February 6, 2018

        Maybe it is? Comparable perhaps to the rise of Homo Sapiens … and the decline of Neanderthal Man …?

        Reply
      • Gerrit

         /  February 6, 2018

        Yep we had one of those in 1969 as well. Remember the dawning of the age of Aquarius?

        Reply
        • PartisanZ

           /  February 6, 2018

          The dawning of a 2000 year long Age … where dawn takes about 50 years to break …

          Expect to “see the light” anytime soon …

          Reply
          • PartisanZ

             /  February 6, 2018

            Bummer it didn’t happen overnight eh? I can relate to that …

            Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  February 6, 2018

          Gerrit, I found the record of Hair in an opshop-the original LP. it’s a little scratchy, as one would expect, but it’s very good for its age,What time capsule. No, I am not going to tell you where I keep it : D

          Reply
          • Kitty Catkin

             /  February 6, 2018

            Parti, did she really attribute the last line of Gone With the Wind, spoken by Scarlett O’Hara, to Clark Gayford ?

            Reply
            • Yes and the context was so inappropriate also.

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  February 7, 2018

              It’s inappropriate and gibberish. It makes no sense at all.

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  February 7, 2018

              Even if she said Clark Gable, that was wrong, what a stupid mistake, It’s one of the most famous lines in cinema history,

    • PartisanZ

       /  February 6, 2018

      What!? … another run-for-cover Pakeha *CROC*

      Who, pray tell, is or ever was proclaiming “happiness filled” …

      Are relationships based on treaties such as marriage “happiness filled”?

      Why then would the Maori-Pakeha Tiriti relationship necessarily be “happiness filled”?

      It can certainly be better though …

      A variety of opinion from Hone in that interview …

      Reply
      • Gerrit

         /  February 6, 2018

        Me, I proclaimed that all is happiness filled with Aderns 5 day sojourn up North. This proclamation is based on the gushing MSM press.

        My marriage is happiness filled, yours?

        I guess the perpetually aggrieved will never be happiness filled.

        *CROC* needs an explanation as does “run for cover Pakeha”. Care to provide?

        Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  February 7, 2018

      Gerrit, Hone is never happy unless he has something to whinge about.

      Reply
  4. Gezza

     /  February 6, 2018

    Ardern now has the chance to show that her Labour government is not the Clark government of old.

    There are two leadership concepts Māori place huge value on. The first is ‘kanohi kitea’ best translated as visible leadership. It was visible leadership that allowed the late Hon. Parekura Horomia to retain his seat in Ikaroa Rāwhiti despite the iwi of the east coast being among the worst affected by his government’s foreshore and seabed legislation. Whatever the hui, if it mattered to his people, Horomia made time to be there and he was loved for it.

    Waitangi matters to Māori. Under the korowai of her key Māori advisors, five days in Te Tai Tokerau will demonstrate that Ardern understands the importance of kanohi kitea and is prepared to invest the time to practice it. Time will tell if the rest of Labour’s Pākehā leadership are too.

    The second concept is ‘rangatira ki te rangatira’, meeting chief to chief. The best example of how Labour has failed to live up to this while in government was in 2005 when they appointed the then MP for Taupo Mark Burton as Minister for Treaty Negotiations. Under Burton, settlements pretty much ground to a halt until he resigned from cabinet in 2007 and was replaced by Dr Michael Cullen. Māori leaders didn’t appreciate dealing with someone who was seen as not being of sufficient rank for the job.

    In this regard National have out performed Labour. Christopher Finlayson is held in the highest regard and under his stewardship the settlement process has taken a quantum leap forward.

    But National has taken the concept of ‘rangatira ki te rangatira’ to the extreme, preferring the Iwi Leaders Forum as their primary point of contact with te ao Māori.

    Like Key before him, English is a big fan of the forum thanks to what he describes as their “forward looking, business focus”. But to say that National has engaged meaningfully with Māori as a result of this relationship is like saying you’ve consulted with New Zealanders because you’ve had a hui with the Business Round Table.

    Ardern’s five days means the prime minister will spend time among some of our most neglected communities as opposed to the conference centres often frequented by the forum.

    The decision for Ardern to speak on the māhau at Waitangi’s top marae will not have been made lightly. Negotiations to hammer down the detail of how this will work are still ongoing. But that Ardern is willing to put herself out there is an admirable expression of rangatira ki te rangatira.

    It’s not for me to comment on the tikanga implications of Ardern speaking on a marae, but in my experience Ngāpuhi are exponents of the saying huri te ao, huri te tikanga – as the world evolves, so too does tikanga.

    (ex The Spinoff)

    Reply
  5. Corky

     /  February 6, 2018

    I didn’t see Titiwhai. If she wasn’t present, was she told to stay away?

    Reply
  6. Corky

     /  February 6, 2018

    Crikey. Some twats need Spec Savers.

    ”Corky / February 6, 2018
    Yes, he can claim some credit. His absence applied the heat to Nagapuhi. It highlighted the train wreck that was the Waitangi organising committee.”

    Reply
  7. Alan Wilkinson

     /  February 6, 2018

    We should never shy away from that because if we don’t speak freely how do we change?

    Without a trace of irony when most women are barred from speaking on marae?

    Reply
    • Pickled Possum

       /  February 7, 2018

      Morena Al Woman are not barred from speaking on the marae, only certain parts of it.
      The marae atea is the place of Tumatauenga The Maori God of War.

      The wahine’s karanga is the first voice on the marae, this cannot be disputed. Therefore the woman is responsible for laying tapu upon the proceedings. Therefore the woman is the first bearer of the mauri of the marae. And when the karanga is happening and the ope is walking onto the marae atea, it is women who lead the way, not men.

      When it comes time to sit on the paepae however men sit in the front. Why? Because in the old days (and even today) it was natural for speakers to whiu makutu, or throw around curses. As bearers of life, women needed to be protected, thus they sit behind to be sheltered. He whakatauki whakamahuki: “He tao rākau ka karohia. He tao kupu, e kore e karohia” (A wooden spear may be dodged, a spear of words cannot be dodged.) But when the man has finished his whaikorero, it is women who led the waiata tautoko, the song of support.

      After the hariru comes the hakari, and who prepares that? The wahine. Some may say that this relegation to the kitchen is a further sign of oppression. But remember how an intense tapu is placed upon everybody with the karanga? Well the hakari is there to whakanoa, to remove the tapu and free all present from the restrictions associated with tapu. Therefore women have two of the most important jobs of all; to place the tapu and to whakanoa the tapu.

      Reply
  8. Alan Wilkinson

     /  February 6, 2018

    My only direct observation of Waitangi this year was that the 21 gun salute was five minutes late.

    As for Gezza’s Spinoff article above, it seems to me the main principle for Ngapuhi is “follow the money and make sure the other guy doesn’t get his hands on it before you do”.

    Reply
    • duperez

       /  February 6, 2018

      … fancy that, Ngapuhi having such a universal principle! 🙂

      Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  February 6, 2018

        Indeed, that is why they are unable to settle or even negotiate their treaty claims.

        Reply
  9. Alan Wilkinson

     /  February 6, 2018

    “Because one day I want to be able to tell my child that I earned the right to stand here, and only you can tell me when I have done that.”

    Since Lord and Lady Bledisloe gifted the site to the nation we are all entitled to stand there. However NZers are currently charged $20 for the privilege. I hope Jacinda paid.

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  February 6, 2018

      I think you perhaps you accidentally misrepresented the context.

      Reply
    • PartisanZ

       /  February 7, 2018

      How the f*#k did Lord & Lady Bledisloe come to own Waitangi!?

      Not sure why the Waitangi Trust FoH people don’t automatically tell everyone, but you can join ‘Friends of Waitangi’ for $5 and entry is free for life after that.

      “The previous Governor-General, Lord Bledisloe, had seen the Māori decision to build the whare as their testimony to the sincerity of British honour and integrity, but in fact Māori saw it as a reminder to Pakeha that the agreement they had entered into had not been honoured.

      Many Māori, however, including leaders such as Te Puea and the Māori King, Korokī, boycotted the 1940 Waitangi commemorations because of the raupatu, or land confiscations of the nineteenth century, which had not been settled.

      Ngāpuhi attended the 1940 ceremony, but displayed red blankets in protest at the compulsory acquisition of what had been deemed ‘surplus lands’ in Northland. As Sir Apirana Ngata reflected – many Pakeha considered him as a Māori voice of reason and evidence of Māori progress – ‘I do not know of any year the Māori people have approached with so much misgiving as this Centennial Year … In retrospect what does the Māori see? Lands gone, the power of chiefs humbled in the dust, Māori culture scattered and broken.’

      The protests were largely ignored. Only the positive aspects of Ngata’s speech had much interest to the press. For most Pakeha the Treaty was not about obligations not met, but the vehicle for British settlement and government.”

      https://nzhistory.govt.nz/culture/centennial/the-centennial-and-the-treaty-of-waitangi

      Reply
  10. sorethumb

     /  February 7, 2018

    She waffled a whole lot of platitudes. We ate not walking in the same direction (or whatever she said).
    The separation of nation and state has consequences: who decides who or what constitutes the character of that nation? I still haven’t got my head around that but it seems to essentialise and strengthen an identity. As a thought experiment Ngati Cambell and Ngati Mc Donald are two nations and rather than dissolve into history they have Ngati Campbell studies and etc

    Reply
    • PartisanZ

       /  February 7, 2018

      The supposedly lost ‘integration’ of nation and state you seem to be pining for was more illusory than real. As my link evidences, Pakeha ruling elites of the era, along with their legitimizing press, they decided who or what constituted the character of the nation …

      For the dominant culture, in 1940, all was joyful British sincerity, honour and integrity, and happy Maori assimilation …

      For the colonized … see my above link …

      There isn’t ‘an’ identity … one identity … There never was …

      How many of the 1905 ‘Originals’ All Blacks defected to Rugby League?*

      Even in the days of the great ‘Black Panther’, George Nepia, defection to the ‘professional game’ was the end of playing rugby union … for life …

      Yous ‘one’ national identity people have been totally sucked in.

      * six

      Reply

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