‘This Is Me’

To me the solo vocals are a bit ordinary and same old, certainly didn’t grab me, and the lyrics didn’t seem to fit the melody well at times.

But I think the the mass vocals are great, enhanced by the visuals – it’s good to see people obviously enjoying the performance.

NZ Herald has the story behind it: School leavers’ stirring rendition of ‘This is Me’

An inspirational rendition of Golden Globe winning song “This is Me” has been belted out by 400 Kiwi school-leavers ready to take on university.

The students, mostly graduates of south Auckland schools, sang the song from the hit “The Greatest Showman” as part of a UniPrep programme at Auckland University of Technology (AUT) South Campus last week.

The hit song – which is also in line for an Oscar – is performed on the show by Broadway star Keala Settle, who is of Maori descent and who still has family in New Zealand.

This Is Me is from the recent musical release The Greatest Showman starring Hugh Jackman, Zac Efron and Michelle Williams.

The 400 school leavers sang in unison with the aid of conductor Igelese Ete.

 

Leave a comment

16 Comments

  1. You’re right – the mass vocals are great, they’re really strong, tuneful and compelling. The lead singers are very weak. It’s their breathing, adopting their version of a “quiver” for effect, their failure to enunciate clearly and their new-pacific ( the future of our voice) brotown accents. They’ve probably never had the opportunity of voice training.

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  February 11, 2018

      I loved them. That takes guts.

      Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  February 11, 2018

        I heard the contestants in an opera contest a while ago. All articulated beautifully as well as singing beautifully except one girl. Her voice was exquisite, but her enunciation was very poor and unless she improves greatly I can’t see her really making it.

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  February 11, 2018

          The world is full of untrained singers who are poor enunciators & can’t be heard over the cacophany of their band & have still made fortunes.

          Reply
          • Kitty Catkin

             /  February 11, 2018

            It’s different in opera.

            Reply
            • Gezza

               /  February 11, 2018

              I know. A lot of English-speaking people who luv it probably don’t understand the language it’s being sung in.

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  February 11, 2018

              Not the point. It’s obvious that the singer is not only singing the words, they are enunciating them-I can follow them if it’s a language I know and the words are always clear when it’s a great singer. This girl had been trained. Clear enunciation is essential for opera.

            • Gezza

               /  February 11, 2018

              Righto. I don’t really care. I don’t like opera.

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  February 11, 2018

              I used not to, either, but now I wonder at myself being such a philistine as to not love opera,

  2. duperez

     /  February 11, 2018

    I wasn’t about the quality of the singing and presumed as the leads came from the throng they weren’t trained pros.

    What I liked was the quality of the experience, all the young and hopeful, with dreams for the future starting a new chapter of their life experience. The vitality and excitement is what appealed to me.

    And while it was ‘This is me’ and it was them, it is us, it is our, New Zealand’s future.

    Reply
    • PDB

       /  February 11, 2018

      Yep – no doubt straight back to their smart phones & life on social media as soon as the last note rang out…

      Reply
      • duperez

         /  February 11, 2018

        Yeah, no doubt, which doesn’t mean they don’t have dreams and the moment wasn’t meaningful for them.

        I wouldn’t expect the smiles on their faces and the light in their eyes to outshine any cynicism staring back at them.

        Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s