Media watch – Friday

23 February 2018

MediaWatch

Media Watch is a focus on New Zealand media, blogs and social media. You can post any items of interested related to media.

A primary aim here is to hold media to account in the political arena. A credible and questioning media is an essential part of a healthy democracy.

A general guideline – post opinion on or excerpts from and links to blog posts or comments of interest, whether they are praise, criticism, pointing out issues or sharing useful information.

Previous Post

23 Comments

  1. Gezza

     /  February 23, 2018

    Barry Soper: Surely a handshake isn’t too much to ask
    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=12000000

    Well, he’s right – isn’t he?
    I note Julie-Anne Genter – Minister for Women – let her side down.

    Posted: https://yournz.org/2018/02/23/should-a-handshake-be-expected/

    • Gezza

       /  February 23, 2018

      From the article:
      The Minister of Diplomacy Winston Peters was unaware of the incident but said when he’s met some female ministers offshore, he knew the protocol adding you’ve got to be as polite as you can which doesn’t always require a handshake.

      He passed it on up to the Prime Minister for further reaction.

      So, that was Winston speaking as Minister for Foreign Affairs. Anyone care to venture what he would’ve said in Opposition, speaking as leader of NZ First? 🤔

  2. robertguyton

     /  February 23, 2018

    To much to ask…of the Iranians?
    No, not too much.

    • Gezza

       /  February 23, 2018

      Possum – out of interest, what would your hapu iwi expect if the Iranian delegation visited your marae? Would they expect them to follow the powhiri kawa, & hongi with nga wahine?

  3. Blazer

     /  February 23, 2018

    It’s not a big deal.Don’t shake hands,so what.Many cultural differences exist,thats life.Imposing your own traditions on others is hardly…diplomacy.

    • Ray

       /  February 23, 2018

      Blazer has got to the heart of the matter.
      This is the third time this year Blazer and I agree, do you feel a slight edging to the right Blaze.

    • robertguyton

       /  February 23, 2018

      Do you mean, Blazer, that our cultural tradition of supporting a woman who was denied a handshake, by denying your own handshaking obligations, is not a big deal?

      • Blazer

         /  February 23, 2018

        when did shaking hands become…an obligation?.Plenty of people I wouldn’t …shake hands with.What if the customery introduction wasa kiss on both cheeks….should everyone have to endure that…too?

    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  February 23, 2018

      Does that apply to the Iranians?

    • David

       /  February 23, 2018

      The export education industry should be shut down outside of universities and polytechnics, the whole thing is predicated on immigration advantages and cheap labour in ethnic eateries and other businesses and its shredding NZs reputation.
      Why would someone from India spend 10s of thousands to be educated here at some dodgy back street facility with 2nd rate tutors when there are brilliant facilities at home…not to mention online. Joyce should have fixed it and started too but it was cheap labour, Labour promised to fix it but doubt they will either.

      • Blazer

         /  February 23, 2018

        Pretty accurate summation..there David.

      • Gezza

         /  February 23, 2018

        I’ve noticed how the Nats love to call it “export education”. We don’t export this education! Just makes it sound better than “student imports”.

  4. Alan Wilkinson

     /  February 23, 2018

    The worm turns. With a Lefty Government the MSM operates as its PR agent and buries all the bad news into a single sentence down the bottom of the report with a big good news heading:
    https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/101690712/kiwi-communities-rally-for-refugees-in-era-of-human-rights-abuses-report

    Under National the story would have been all about the single buried sentence:
    the Amnesty International report … raises red flags about the health and well-being of children; insufficient mental health services; poor conditions within detention facilities and disproportionate Māori representation in the criminal justice system

    • Gezza

       /  February 23, 2018

      A well-balanced story that reports on Amnesty International’s upticks for NZ, but also notes their criticisms (matters about which there have been countless news reports – & which aren’t the focus of this story) & you start whining, Sir Alan?

      I’m sure the Coalition Government will be being held to account when they’ve actually started failing to deliver on promised policies or any of these negative factor trends worsen.

      I’m not happy about our bringing in more Muslim refugees & immigrants & hope we keep any increase to a really low number, because if the communities get too large & concentrated we’ll have problems with those who won’t adapt.

      But for heaven’s sake cheer up.

      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  February 23, 2018

        Come off it, Sir Gerald. The contrast with how it would have been presented and run a year ago is stark and blatant. This is the Amnesty report on NZ 2017/18. Can you really claim the Stuff article fairly represents it or would have been written this way with a National Government in power? If so, you have Nelsonian vision.

        NEW ZEALAND
        New Zealand
        Head of state: Queen Elizabeth II, represented by Patricia Lee Reddy
        Head of government: Jacinda Ardern (replaced Bill English in October)
        New Zealand received criticism about its mental health services, detention facilities, high rates of Indigenous Māori representation in the criminal justice system, and about poor health and wellbeing among children.
        JUSTICE SYSTEM
        The Waitangi Tribunal, a permanent commission of inquiry, found that the government had failed to prioritize the reduction of the high rate of recidivism among Māori and had breached its Treaty of Waitangi obligations. The commission called for urgent practical action to reduce the number. The National Preventive Mechanism found that Māori were disproportionally represented in all detention centres. Mental health and disability in detention continued to be a concern. Separate reviews by the Ombudsman and an independent expert commissioned by the Human Rights Commission highlighted the high use of prolonged solitary confinement and restraint practices in places of detention and the overrepresentation of ethnic minority groups in these incidents. The use of “tie-down beds and/or waist restraints in at-risk units was found to amount to cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment. The separation of children and young people in “secure care” units in “care and protection” residences was found to be inappropriate.
        REFUGEES AND ASYLUM-SEEKERS
        The government announced the framework for its pilot community sponsorship programme for refugee resettlement, to begin at the end of the year. The new refugee category allows community groups to sponsor 25 refugees to enter New Zealand.
        CHILDREN’S RIGHTS
        A UNICEF report raised concern over the health and wellbeing of children in New Zealand, due to the high rates of teen pregnancy, neonatal mortality and the high teen suicide rate. The UN Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination recommended the establishment of an independent inquiry into abuse suffered by children, the vast majority Māori, in state care between the 1950s and 1990s.
        INTERNATIONAL JUSTICE
        The authorities declined to hold an independent inquiry into allegations that the New Zealand Defence Force committed crimes under international law during a raid in Afghanistan in 2010, resulting in civilian deaths. Lawyers filed a civil lawsuit calling for a judicial review on behalf of the alleged Afghan victims.
        RIGHT TO HEALTH
        The Auditor-General found that problems with access to housing, rehabilitation and other services led to patients being kept in mental health units for years.

        • Gezza

           /  February 23, 2018

          Christ! What a disaster National left the state of things in!

          Lucky they’ve been let off by the msm because things are looking up & they’ve obviously had enuf of exposing the last government’s bullshit!

    • Gezza

       /  February 23, 2018

      I gotta go out for a few hours. If he hangs around, can somebody else keep Sir Alan under control please.

      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  February 23, 2018

        Keep turning Left, Sir G, and you are bound to get home eventually even if you have to walk up the stream with your eels.

  5. Zedd

     /  February 23, 2018

    I heard on ‘Democracy Now’ (Indep USA news) that at ‘Mr Ts listening session; he suggested that Teachers should be armed & trained, as ‘first responders’ to possibly take down, any ‘shooters’ in future.. “How F’ing Ridiculous” (paraphrased response from a parent) “they are there to teach the children, not act as their defence shield.”

    btw: I would note that the ‘all powerful’ NRA stands for: National RIFLE association, not National MACHINE-GUN association. Why are they so adamant that, that every Joe/Jo Citizen should be able to own/carry Military-style weapons, AR15 etc. in major cities, that with a simple attachment can be turned into a Machine-Gun ??
    Thats CRAZY MAN ! 😦