Q&A: Greenpeace and fossil fuels

Greenpeace was declined charity status this week because of their activist activities and law breaking – see Greenpeace declined charity status.

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has given mixed signals about what the Government’s position is on the use of fossil fuels and on oil and gas exploration. She has said that climate change is the issue of the time, and received a petition against exploration that Greenpeace presented to Parliament recently, but she has been vague about what they will actually do.

This morning on Q&A theor director Russel Normal is interviewed about fossil fuels.

Farewell fossil fuels?
Greenpeace executive director Russel Norman is on the programme today to explain why New Zealand must end all new oil and gas exploration.

11 Comments

  1. Alan Wilkinson

     /  March 25, 2018

    The petrochemical industry has many products other than fuel. Let economics control resource allocation and usage, not ideologues and politicians.

    • PartisanZ

       /  March 25, 2018

      Alan, you mean “Let a narrow branch of economics controlled by corporate-capitalist, ruling-elite ideologues and their politician, lobby-group and ‘think tank’ lackeys control resource allocation and usage … not a more expansive ‘economics tree’, eco-nomics or evonomics informed by ethical ideals, social responsibility and unimpeded (or less impeded) politicians, alternative thinkers and NGOs …

      ‘New Ecological Economics: Superorganism and Ultrasociality’ – Evonomics

      http://evonomics.com/ecological-economics-superorganism-lisi-krall/

      • PartisanZ

         /  March 25, 2018

        Given the Lobster-Darwinian, narrow-view, tunnel vision, militarized economics we have, and its history, yours is also a lot like saying, “Let war control resource allocation and usage …”

        • Gezza

           /  March 25, 2018

          Given the chronically parlous state of all arms of our Defence Forces could you explain to me what you mean by our militarised economics?

      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  March 25, 2018

        Nope. Economics is controlled by practicality and consumer needs. You are talking about finance and political manipulation.

  2. NOEL

     /  March 25, 2018

    Was obvous when the Labour opposition was critical of the National government sitting on the Carbon Zero options report, which option they would choose.
    Not surprising then that exploration is no longer considered necessary.

  3. Zedd

     /  March 25, 2018

    It seems that many folks are willing to agree that the ‘over use’ of fossil fuels in recent decades is contributing to climate change, sea level rise, increased acidity of the oceans, melting of icecaps & glaciers etc. There is also a concern about the increase in non-biodegradable plastics (made from oil) in the land fills & the oceans.. BUT what is being done to really prevent it getting worse; “BUGGER ALL !”
    Every week I go to the local supermarket, (on foot with a large shopping bag on my back) & see the carpark full of 4x4s & many folks still filling up their trolleys with ‘single use’ plastic shopping bags; that will end up in the land fill etc.

    WAKEUP & realise that, what all the ‘Greenies’ are saying is true, we only have one planet & there is not a magical place where all the pollution disappears to, when we toss it in the bin/landfill/oceans !! 😦

    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  March 25, 2018

      How do plastic bags get from landfill to the ocean? I don’t see any connection. How do media swallow blatant nonsense?

      • Gezza

         /  March 25, 2018

        From factory to ocean: how your plastic bags contribute to the Great Pacific Plastic Garbage Dump
        http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11809973

        They blow into watercourses Alan. The blow all over landfill tips on windy days. Even the ones ones that get caught on the tip fences get ripped loose eventually.

        I see submerged plastic shopping bags (and other, bigger, more robust brand store bags, drifting down my stream quite frequently. Along with plastic bottles, plastic fast food containers. And since a building project got started nearby, 20 litre plastic paint pails, stopping compound pails, roof tiles, blocks of insulation, carpet cutoffs, plastic piping.

  1. Q&A: Greenpeace and fossil fuels — Your NZ – NZ Conservative Coalition