Media watch – Thursday

29 March 2018

MediaWatch

Media Watch is a focus on New Zealand media, blogs and social media. You can post any items of interested related to media.

A primary aim here is to hold media to account in the political arena. A credible and questioning media is an essential part of a healthy democracy.

A general guideline – post opinion on or excerpts from and links to blog posts or comments of interest, whether they are praise, criticism, pointing out issues or sharing useful information.

Previous Post

22 Comments

  1. Gezza

     /  March 29, 2018

    Hamish Rutherford – Stuff

    “… Curran, the enigmatic MP for Dunedin South, has made herself a type of cocktail party joke that she will probably never shake, for reasons which have little to do with RNZ, but her other title.

    The Minister of Open Government.

    When your very job title is the punchline of the joke, you are doomed.

    In reality her official portfolio title is less poetic – Associate Minister of State Services (Open Government) – but the other, more earnest moniker has stuck.

    If Jacinda Ardern is determined not to sack her, she cannot possibly escape the fact that a plank of her Government – to be more transparent than National – is utterly comic while Curran is its figurehead.”

    Quite like that 😀

    • Blazer

       /  March 29, 2018

      Being more transparent than National is a walk in the…park.

      • Gezza

         /  March 29, 2018

        She’ll be having future coffees in The Green Parrot, with her undiaried meeting attendees being told via dropboxes to look for a bloke with a beard, a dark raincoat, dark hat, beard & sunglasses, I shouldn’t wonder.

      • High Flying Duck

         /  March 29, 2018

        If it’s so easy Blazer, why is this Government making such an enormous cock up of it?

        For example:

        • NOEL

           /  March 29, 2018

          Don’t know why. There are enough cop outs in section 6 to 9 to be manipulated.

      • Trevors_elbow

         /  March 29, 2018

        Does that make Clare Minister for Fun Walks as well?

    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  March 29, 2018

      Never heard of him but obviously must be one of Winston’s weirdos. Where does he find them?

      • Blazer

         /  March 29, 2018

        up North…mostly.

      • Gezza

         /  March 29, 2018

        Ball’s a list MP from Palmerston North.
        Can’t be helped. He has to get them from somewhere.

        • PDB

           /  March 29, 2018

          Haven’t been there for a decade or so – does anybody know if it’s still the utter dump I remember?

          • Gezza

             /  March 29, 2018

            It might not be as utter. My neighbour’s daughter & son-in-law moved to PN just before Xmas. They’d checked the place out & quite liked it, plus housing & rent were cheaper. He’s looking for a place with a bit of land.

  2. sorethumb

     /  March 29, 2018

    NZ Geographic
    Blunder on Mt Zorro
    As the country’s commitment to bicultural partnership grows stronger, Maori sensibilities about landscapes as cultural taonga are going to become more significant in land-use decisions. We’ve already witnessed change here, most notably the declarations of the personhood of Te Urewera, Whanganui River and Mt Taranaki. These big-ticket recognitions are making possible similar shifts in understanding for other landscape features. Many climbers, for instance, will no longer stand on the highest summit of Aoraki out of respect for its ancestral importance to Ngai Tahu.
    A similar trend is happening in Australia. Late last year, it was announced that climbing Uluru/Ayers Rock would cease in 2019 —an outcome that has been sought for decades by the traditional owners. The most interesting aspect of that decision is the rapid decline in the number of visitors climbing the rock, as people have become aware of how deeply offensive doing that is to Aboriginal people.
    In Te Mata’s case, some of the track’s supporters have scoffed at the idea that the hill remains sacred to Kahungunu. In their mind, the existing recreational amenities have neutralised or destroyed any sacredness. But that assumed divide between using a place and revering a place is a narrowly Western mindset. Spiritual connection and public access do not necessarily exclude each other. In fact, many philosophers argue that to participate fully in the places we inhabit requires spiritual, emotional and physical engagement.
    Indigenous worldviews such as those of Maori and Aboriginal Australians provide inspiration for a richer relationship to place. For Aboriginal people, spiritual, historic and economic dimensions of landscapes are not mutually exclusive categories, writes anthropologist Nancy Williams. “They are complementary and reinforcing modes of perceiving and using land and natural resource.”
    For 21st-century New Zealanders, so often caught up in polarised resource-use battles—conservation vs development, ecology vs economy, nature vs culture—that kind of complementarity offers a path to resolution of hitherto intractable conflicts. That journey—or let’s call it a track—begins with better communication, more inclusive decision-making, broader measures of valuation and new myths of belonging.
    https://www.nzgeo.com/stories/blunder-on-mt-zorro

    How do we know when offence isn’t just about exercising power/status?

    • Gezza

       /  March 29, 2018

      When you talk to the kaumatua or tohunga about why it is sacred, what their people do, and when they say it doesn’t matter how much money you offer, that’s not what the issue is.

  3. sorethumb

     /  March 29, 2018

    Stories of the second Great Maori Migration
    http://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/ninetonoon/audio/2018633382/stories-of-the-second-great-maori-migration

    They talk about low home ownership rates and moving out of Auckland but Ryan doesn’t mention the elephant in the room (immigration). She seems to have a benign view of it all as they might move to the provinces which are “beginning to show signs of growth” -really?

  4. PDB

     /  March 29, 2018

    Hooton talks shit at the best of times but he has a great summary of the lack of leadership from Ardern here: http://www.nzherald.co.nz/business/news/article.cfm?c_id=3&objectid=12022002

    “It’s early days, but Jacinda Ardern risks being the first one-term Prime Minister since Walter Nash.

    Eighteen years ago, Helen Clark’s Government was about to be confronted by the Winter of Discontent. The next eight years are a warning not to prematurely predict a Prime Minister’s early demise.

    Still, the speed with which stuff-ups, miscommunications and genuine scandals are now piling up against Jacinda Ardern’s Government is unprecedented.

    In just two weeks, there have been at least eight, all either woefully mishandled by Ardern or reflecting the inherent instability of the first Government reliant on both NZ First and the Greens.”

    This is of particular interest regarding the RNZ story: ” Ardern risks further humiliation as more information emerges next week.”

  5. Gezza

     /  March 29, 2018

    New Zealand has imposed a travel ban on the Russians expelled by other allied nations, following the nerve agent attack on a former Russian double-agent and his daughter in the UK.

    Several nations, including every other Five Eyes partner, have expelled a number of Russian diplomats following the attack.

    The ban applies to the diplomats expelled by our Five Eyes partners and other close allies, affecting at least 100 Russian nationals.

    https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/politics/102704079/govt-considers-russian-travel-ban-following-uk-nerve-agent-attack