Marama Davidson’s acceptance speech

Some interesting extracts from Marama Davidson’s Green co-leadership acceptance speech.

I will be a leader who strives for consensus in everything I do. All of our contributions and views are essential in the work we have ahead of us.

Consensus with whom? Consensus in the Green Party? I presume that’s what she means, Greens promote consensus style democracy – when it suits. But that’s not how some of them work in practice, Green supporters and activists can be very intolerant of any person or party with whom they disagree.

Consensus with her supporters? Consensus with the New Zealand public? That would be radical for Green radicals.

History shows that smaller parties struggle to retain their support in coalition governments, lose influence and can sometimes fracture.

My number one goal as co-leader is to make sure that doesn’t happen to us.

That could be a big challenge for Davidson, promoting a more left wing radical social agenda without fracturing the Labour-NZ First-Green government.

We can’t clean our rivers, save our native species, lift our families out of poverty, build warm safe houses and new public transport if our party isn’t united and positive, governing and campaigning for change.

And there is a lot to change.

The National Government has left our country in a mess. It is worse than even we imagined.

So consensus with National on environmental issues seems out of the question. I think this is disappointing – sustainable policies on a sustainable environment would work much better with a degree of consensus across all parties.

Steven Joyce was right, there is a fiscal hole. We see it every day. In the sewerage in the walls of Middlemore Hospital where the Government was more interested in delivering a surplus than making sure our babies were born in safe conditions.

We see National’s fiscal hole in our homeless and unemployed,

In our impoverished families

In our lonely and isolated elderly

We see it our polluted rivers

In our threatened species

And in our climate pollution

But National didn’t just leave a fiscal deficit, they left a moral one too.

So I guess Davidson means consensus with allies, not with everyone.

More than ever we need to deliver on our policy programme and stamp our mark on the Government with bold and effective Green solutions to the fiscal and moral deficit left by National.

More than ever we need to be strong and united. Backing our Ministers and MPs to lead lasting Green change and working with our coalition allies to go even further, be even bolder.

We can make the change Aotearoa needs and grow our vote, returning after 2020 with more MPs and influence.

Remember Metiria? She nearly obliterated the Greens last election. Davidson is generally seen as a Metiria replacement. Will she learn from Turei’s big mistake, or try something similar.

I am a leader who, alongside James, can deliver that real change and grow the Greens by representing a broad cross-section of New Zealanders.

This seems to be Green self-delusion – that they represent a broad cross-section of New Zealanders. They got 6.3% of the vote.

I am very much looking forward to working with James and with our different backgrounds, skills and experiences I think we will make a strong leadership team.

Between us we represent the broad church of green voters. Our different backgrounds and experiences mean we empathise and understand the cross section of issues from economic to social. From human rights to environmental sustainability. We are a team that can reach all.

I think she is right here – Davidson and Shaw probably do represent ‘the broad church of green voters’ – but that’s far from ‘a broad cross-section of New Zealanders’.

James and I will work to regain the trust and support of those voters who left us in the last election, and we also need to be reaching out to new audiences.

A big task.

In order to be a genuine and relevant voice for modern Aotearoa, we need to reflect its diverse reality.

We need more members from all backgrounds and communities.

We need to be present in multicultural, Māori and Pasifika communities, in provincial and rural communities, and in the suburbs, with women, young people and workers.

I have the connections and credibility in these communities. I’m proud to have helped lead the work to start to diversify the party over recent years and as Co-leader I will prioritise it.

A fairly selective diversity. ‘With women’ pointedly excludes half the population. Her National bashing also by association excludes about half the voting population. Farmers and small business owners don’t feature in her diversity, but are a very important part of the New Zealand fabric.

As an activist for social and environmental justice, I stood with many communities on the frontlines of the climate change and inequality crises and the struggles for indigenous rights.

Indigenous rights are important, there are still wrongs and flow-on effects effects that need to be righted. But the rights of the non-indigenous also need to be considered.

I have demonstrated the ability to pull together teams, inspire the best in everyone, and elevate the voices of those who are not otherwise heard.

She may well help inspire better from National MPs, but in reaction rather than cooperation.

And I intend to make that a defining feature of my leadership, elevating voices and working alongside our friends up and down the country campaigning for change.

Good on her for that. It’s good for a minority party to work with minorities and promote minority rights.

I will make sure those without a political voice are heard, and I will be the only leader of a political party in Parliament that brings to the table deep sustained experience in these communities.

Some of those communities. Davidson does not try to represent many of the ‘silent majority’, just selected minorities. That’s not a bad thing, but believing she represents all New Zealanders would be a mistake.

As the most progressive party in Parliament, it is the role of the Greens to continue to be a loud and active voice on behalf of our communities.

‘Progressive’ is highly debatable here. Some see some Green policies, especially the more radical leanings of Davidson and her core supporters, to be regressive.

The next few years will be critical for Aotearoa and the world as we grapple with the crises of climate change, inequality and environmental degradation.

Labelling them crises may not encourage wide support, and excluding the official name of the country could also be divisive.

In this country, two men own more wealth than the poorest 30 per cent of the adult population.

The richest 10 per cent have more than half of the wealth, while 90 per cent of the population owns less than half of the nation’s wealth.

Depends on how you define ‘wealth’. This is populist bashing of people with paper money.

We are losing our indigenous biodiversity at an alarming rate – three-quarters of native fish, one-third of invertebrates, and one-third of plants are threatened with, or at risk of, extinction.

Addressing this is likely to be widely supported.

We have among the highest rates of homelessness, child poverty, suicide among young people, and incarceration in the developed world, alongside among the highest per capita carbon emissions in the world, and rivers so polluted you can’t even swim in them.

Some issues of serious concern there, that have to be addressed much better.

These environmental and social crises are the direct result of a flawed and broken economic model.

I’m not sure that fits with consensus views. It sounds more like a promotion of a revolution, a change to a radical and untested alternative that would be out of step with most of the developed world.

Parliament needs to turn our faces to the streets, to communities right up and down this country, and understand the hardship and struggle that so many of our people are facing.

Yes – to all of the communities, the many struggles people face.

New Zealanders have been waiting far too long for a fundamental shift in our politics, for the return of care and compassion, for a real commitment to our natural world.

Except there is little sign of a fundamental shift in voting preferences.

For an economic system that measures its success by the wellbeing of the people and the environment, not simple GDP growth and the massive accumulation of wealth and power in the hands of a few.

A minority party fighting for the many against the few.

The Green Party vision for Aotearoa would restore us as a world leader through the greatest challenges of our time.

Restore? New Zealand omitted again. I support at least debating whether to rename our country or not, but not to ignore the widely accepted name of New Zealand. (She does refer a couple of times to ‘Aotearoa New Zealand’ and also to ‘New Zealanders’ – Aotearoan doesn’t seem to have caught on yet.

It would ensure all children grow up in healthy, liveable cities, in warm, dry homes that are affordable for their parents.

A vision for a country where all people have a liveable income and people don’t have to work two or three jobs just to survive.

Worthy ideals to aspire to, but they are ideals that ignore realities.

And that recognises the central importance of honouring our founding document, Te Tiriti o Waitangi and celebrates our unique and vibrant diversity.

Our whole diversity. We all should have a good look at what Te Tiriti means and should mean in modern New Zealand Aotearoa.

Parliament needs leaders and parties that champion minority rights. But they will alienate more than succeed if they believe they represent popular opinion and wishes while picking the minorities they want to represent, and at the same time alienate large groups of others.

If Davidson championed issues that faced the majority of New Zealanders in the middle who face struggles and challenges of their own, if she didn’t omit non-females and non-Māori and those who value the input and diversity of past and recent immigrants, then she could do well, and might widen support for the Greens.

But if she pretends to represent the many while being divisive and excluding large chunks of New Zealand society she and the Greens are likely remain a small minority party fighting for small minorities.

Leave a comment

82 Comments

  1. lurcher1948

     /  April 9, 2018

    Someone on a blog elsewhere doesn’t like her or his… country

    We hear it is National’s fault for everything wrong, for every strike, for every hospital. I have always considered Middlemore Hospital as the worst in the country, in part because it is surrounded by true shit hole suburbs. In other news, the new Pale Green half leader warms to those who rip off benefits.

    Reply
  2. sorethumb

     /  April 9, 2018

    I Let me say clearly now: the housing crisis is not the fault of recent migrants; the unemployment rate is not the fault of recent migrants; and asylum seekers are not a threat to us.
    The housing crisis is primarily a predictable result of successive government’s decisions to leave housing to the free market and refusing to institute a capital gains tax. The Green Party does however want to put restrictions on home ownership for people who are not permanent residents because offshore speculation in our housing market has contributed to the increased price. We didn’t support the National government’s decision introduce (25th July 2011) “Residential Property Development” to the list of acceptable investment types for wealthy overseas investors to apply for be a leader who strives for consensus in everything I do. All of our contributions and views are essential in the work we have ahead of us.
    Jan Logie
    http://blog.greens.org.nz/2014/06/03/immigration-the-green-party-perspective/
    ……

    UKIP London Assembly Member David Kurten said the role of mass migration in “driving up house prices and driving down wages, while putting immense pressure on schools, hospitals and GP surgeries” was already “obvious to everyone” outside of the “Westminster bubble”.

    http://www.breitbart.com/london/2018/04/08/housing-minister-admits-migration-pushed-house-prices-20-per-cent/

    Reply
    • alloytoo

       /  April 9, 2018

      Jan Logie ignores the fact that the housing crisis is as a result of successive Labour mayors resisting all efforts to expand the urban boundary and successive opposition parties for refusing to fix the resource consent act.

      There was no free market those two factors stifled it.

      Reply
  3. sorethumb

     /  April 9, 2018

    What a pity Winston was a charlatan – at least the fishing industry got their monies worth.

    Reply
  4. Zedd

     /  April 9, 2018

    The members have spoken too.. 🙂

    Reply
    • sorethumb

       /  April 9, 2018

      The problem is a stacked membership. People join and then say “not for me” – that’s what they want.

      Reply
  5. Alan Wilkinson

     /  April 9, 2018

    A vision of utopia without a clue how to get there. Greens doomed to wander in the wilderness.

    Reply
    • However they have core supporters of a similar ilk. National must stand for never even pretending to deal with these people. Marama DAvidson.

      Reply
      • robertguyton

         /  April 9, 2018

        National will suck up like crazy to The Greens, if that’s their only hope of regaining their old seats. The Greens, thankfully, will spurn them. Looks like Opposition for a very long time, National!

        Reply
        • PDB

           /  April 9, 2018

          Not much point sucking up to a corpse Guyton – Davidson’s backward looking appointment can only take votes off Labour and nowhere else.

          Reply
          • robertguyton

             /  April 9, 2018

            How can a person be so out of touch with reality and still breathe; that’s the question PDB’s comments provoke!

            Reply
            • PDB

               /  April 9, 2018

              Glad you’re starting to take a good look in the mirror Guyton. Are you a fair weather fan of the govt? You seemed to magically disappear the last few weeks when the govt went from disaster to disaster…

            • robertguyton

               /  April 9, 2018

              You missed me, PDB!
              Touching.
              I’m not anyone’s fan, though I do like to balance the scales whenever there’s some heavily-biased commentary going on. Personally, I have little real faith in politics and the discussions are mainly churn. Philosophy! Now that’s where the action is!

            • Trevors_elbow

               /  April 9, 2018

              Engaging respectfully… brilliant how you highlight Petes comments about intolerant Greens, Robert

            • robertguyton

               /  April 9, 2018

              The Greens are too, too tolerant, in my view, Trevors_elbow. I’m not so inclined.

            • Gezza

               /  April 9, 2018

              Could be up up up the Khyber yet.

            • Gezza

               /  April 9, 2018

              Whoops. Wrong place. Read on. Pretend you didn’t even see it.

            • robertguyton

               /  April 9, 2018

              Advice that could apply to all of your comments, Gezza 🙂

            • Gezza

               /  April 10, 2018

              Sorry Robert. Dunno what you said there, I’ve stopped reading your rubbish.

        • Trevors_elbow

           /  April 9, 2018

          6.3 to 4.8 is not a long way to fall Robert…

          Besides next time out you will have to explain all your actual doings as a party… you will have a record and it will no longer be theoretical the impact the Greens have and more importantly dont have…. it will be a giverning recird with all the problems of your coalition partners attached

          Vote Green get Winston in charge…

          Enjoy

          Reply
          • robertguyton

             /  April 9, 2018

            The Green’s support will swell substantially, T_e, as the terms pass. We swooped close to the edge recently, but from here on, it’s up, up, up!

            Reply
            • Gezza

               /  April 9, 2018

              Could be right up up up the Khyber yet.

      • Blazer

         /  April 9, 2018

        smart thinking there Trav,never ever…the Greens or NZF…stick with..ACT.A principled opposition is a …fine thing.

        Reply
    • robertguyton

       /  April 9, 2018

      We are not wandering in the wilderness, we’re sitting on the Government benches.

      Reply
      • alloytoo

         /  April 9, 2018

        As socialists, and socialism has never led to a positive environmental outcome.

        Reply
        • robertguyton

           /  April 9, 2018

          Already, The Greens have made huge gains for the environment, alloytoo, you’re just too blinkered to see them. The changes made by Eugenie Sage along with those she’s got “in the pipeline” are staggering, though your channels probably haven’t brought you the news…yet. We thought the early days of the Key Government were a steamroller, but compared with this one, Key’s was a toy in a sand-pit!

          Reply
          • PDB

             /  April 9, 2018

            The Greens have made huge gains for the environment?

            Such as? Taking camera’s off fishing boats in order to appease Winston’s fishing mates? Ditching the Kermadec sanctuary for the same reason? Giving their parliamentary questions to National so they don’t have to grow some balls and actually question anything Labour/NZL First are doing?

            Reply
          • David

             /  April 9, 2018

            “The Greens have made huge gains for the environment, alloytoo, you’re just too blinkered to see them.”

            Enlighten us. Please be specific on the exact changes you have actually made.

            Reply
            • robertguyton

               /  April 9, 2018

              David, as above, “The changes made, along with those “in the pipeline” are staggering, though your channels probably haven’t brought you the news…yet.”
              Be patient and watchful. You’ll soon get the picture. You too, PDB *edit, maybe not.

            • David

               /  April 9, 2018

              Show the news channel we can all tune into to get the picture now.

      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  April 9, 2018

        Really? Where you get to do what? Vote as instructed and otherwise keep quiet? Make silly utopian speeches at party meetings? Fantasise about exercising state power over everyone who actually wants to do something.

        Reply
        • robertguyton

           /  April 9, 2018

          Is the speed limit on our roads an example of your ” exercising state power over everyone who actually wants to do something’, Alan?
          Are you promoting a free-for-all on the roads, so as not to oppress “those who want to do something (go very, very fast)?

          Reply
          • Alan Wilkinson

             /  April 9, 2018

            Everything the government runs is a stuff up. The private sector makes cars that can travel at 200km/h. The govt builds highways with an 80km/h speed limit and collects speeding tickets. The Greens want us to bike at 20km/h.

            Reply
            • robertguyton

               /  April 9, 2018

              So…is that a yes, you recommend speed-free for all on the roads?

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  April 9, 2018

              Absolutely: Hans Monderman suggested that an individual’s behavior in traffic is more positively affected by the built environment of the public space than by conventional traffic control devices and regulations. A reason for the apparent paradox that reduced regulation leads to safer roads may be found by studying the risk compensation effect.

              https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shared_space

              Before common sense was outlawed here we used to have LSZs where drivers employed it. You might care to explain why drivers are expected to judge the safe speed below the speed limit bu somehowt cannot judge it when it is above the official speed limit?

            • robertguyton

               /  April 9, 2018

              Well, Alan, your “go any speed you like, lads” proposal sets you at the looney edge of NZ society. Logically, you’d support legalizing all drugs for all ages, yes? Now we are veering dangerously close to ACT’s ‘incest is okay’ territory (was it the present ACT leader who hinted at this? I think it was).

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  April 9, 2018

              You really hate the thought that people might be the best judges of their own welfare and safety, don’t you Robert?

            • robertguyton

               /  April 9, 2018

              Your wild extrapolation is typical of people like you, Alan. Free for all heroin, is it (you didn’t say)?

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  April 9, 2018

              Says the guy who has just posted a sequence of wild extrapolations.

              Tell us how the War on Drugs has been an outstanding success, Robert.

            • robertguyton

               /  April 9, 2018

              You won’t commit to a view on heroin, Alan? Bit feeble, isn’t it?
              The so-called “War on drugs” has been ugly, I suppose and it’s not one I support. Do you think heroin should be available to all, Alan? Do you think an age limit would be advisable? How about saturation advertising from the producers? Toys with every packet? Any limits at all for you, Alan?

            • Conspiratoor

               /  April 9, 2018

              Alan and robert, two random musings if I may. There are no road rules in India except ‘might is right and it is carnage. However i’ve noticed when the lights are out at local intersections, the traffic controls itself without incident

            • robertguyton

               /  April 9, 2018

              And cows are allowed to wander freely through the cities!
              Alan! Can we have that too? And consigning our dead to the rivers (if we want to!)

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  April 9, 2018

              Robert, in fact I would much prefer people were free to kill themselves with their drug of choice rather than gangs and mafia were rewarded with a massive income source. Prior to the war on drugs we had a few harmless old Chinese with an opium habit and some hippies tripping out on weed and acid. Now thanks to Nixon and the likes of you we have massive drug and crime problems and an industry dependent on them.

              Just to reiterate what I have said many times is that the proper role of government is to protect liberty, life and property – mainly from Red and Green fascists.

            • Blazer

               /  April 9, 2018

              @Con..except for give way to…cows.

            • robertguyton

               /  April 9, 2018

              Curiously, Alan, your views and mine on those issues, are practically identical. I expect we think very similarly on many issues involving freedom of choice – frustrating, I expect you’ll think. Your “red and Green fascists” though, is idiotic.

            • robertguyton

               /  April 9, 2018

              “You really hate the thought that people might be the best judges of their own welfare and safety, don’t you Robert?”
              I do?

          • ” Now we are veering dangerously close to ACT’s ‘incest is okay’ territory (was it the present ACT leader who hinted at this? I think it was)” Robert Guyton says…

            That is a nasty little smear Robert. Just goes to show you’re not only a nasty piece of work but lazy and incompetent. Too lazy to look up who said it and why and in what context…..

            The present ACT leader is David Seymour and he didn’t say what you imply he did in the quote I grabbed. And it was not ACT policy as you imply…. but ya don’t care your just a smearer…

            The actual comment was a part of a philosophical discussion when Jaime Whyte was ambushed by journos who exposed his political naivety.

            http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11210373

            Go educate your self about who said what and why.. before you start with the bullshit “do you still beat your wife” comments.

            Reply
            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  April 9, 2018

              A Lefty who can contribute anything other than emotion, diversion and abuse (usually simultaneously) is a rare thing, dave.

            • I find it interesting Al, that Pete sets rules about how we engage on this blog and then a long comes Robert just spewing smears, insults and doing so in response to any and all questions directed towards the Greens policies or achievements… with no censure…

              Bizarre is Robert, just bizarre

            • I didn’t have time to babysit yesterday.

              I have warned Robert in the past about attacking and provoking people without debating the issues before. He should know the risks he is taking if he ignores that.

              Some of his comments are so absurd they are best ignored.

            • robertguyton

               /  April 9, 2018

              ” New Act leader Jamie Whyte has back-tracked on comments that incestuous relationships between consenting adults should not be illegal. Speaking on RadioLive this morning, Mr Whyte admitted he had regretted the comments published in an article on The Ruminator Website. “I regret the comments, …”
              I see… nothing to do with the ACT Party then (what care I for which leader said what).

            • Read the link I posted you knob and see the truth not what you want it to be. never ACT policy, never anything to do with Seymour. And a piece of rank naivety by Whyte who stupidly answer a entrapment question.

              I’ll say it again you’re a knob and a smear merchant….

  6. Gerrit

     /  April 9, 2018

    And nothing on how green technologies will increase the economic pie.

    If lifting people out of poverty and increasing their well being relies on the increasing taxation on the productive sector, than the whole idea of reducing poverty is doomed from the start.

    Reply
    • Blazer

       /  April 9, 2018

      are financing,insurance and buying and selling property part of this…productive sector?

      Reply
      • Gerrit

         /  April 9, 2018

        Yes if it is not state owned than taxes are due.

        Reply
        • Blazer

           /  April 9, 2018

          are you not aware of S.O.E’s paying dividends to the state coffers.Btw have you booked your accomodation in Italy for the AC…yet?Bol.

          Reply
          • Gerrit

             /  April 9, 2018

            Dividends are not taxation.

            Taxation is due on the dividend but it is like a beneficiary paying income tax.

            Why deduct tax from a state derived dividend. Paper trail only.

            Never was going to travel to Italy to see the AC. Simply said that the cup would (if nothing changed) be sailed there. Whilst it has changed back to NZL favour, I still think there is a 10% chance it wont be hosted here. Lots of contentious wharf extension to be granted resource consent (with much opposition) for, and compromises still to be made before a certain date, for; one construction work to start and two another date set for it to be completed.

            Reply
  7. PDB

     /  April 9, 2018

    Leaves the door open for a party solely focused on environmental outcomes whether members are to the right, center or left of the political divide. So many ex-Green supporters I know don’t support the socialist agenda the ‘NZ Green party’ represents & Davidson’s elevation to co-leader wont win them back. Chances of it happening though? Very low.

    The fact she deliberately left out ‘men’ as a demographic she will represent/ fight for and her emphasis on “two men” owning more wealth than the poorest 30 per cent of the adult population (rather than two people) suggests her sexist beliefs. JAG only decided to bash old, white men so obviously Davidson feels there is room to expand on this theme.

    Question is, if she truly represents her membership and things like freedom of speech etc, will she get the Greens to vote against the waka-jumping bill or is she all hot air?

    Reply
    • robertguyton

       /  April 9, 2018

      PDB, you know nothing of The Greens and your opinions of them are laughable. Their successes so far and ahead are going to leave you battered and torn, like a flimsy rag caught in a gale.

      Reply
      • PDB

         /  April 9, 2018

        Guyton: “PDB, you know nothing of The Greens”

        Big claim there Guyton, one which is in keeping with all your posts – simply wrong. With a mickey mouse party like the Greens everything is laughable.

        Answer this: Do you personally support the ‘waka-jumping’ bill? If so, why? I can tell you now the majority of the green party membership doesn’t but will the Greens do something about it?

        Reply
        • robertguyton

           /  April 9, 2018

          “you know nothing of The Greens” is a “big claim”?
          Really?
          Seems a trifle to me. Your ignorance is palpable.
          Still, you’re daft comments are kinda entertaining, in a stumbling-ox sort of way. Your understanding of The Greens, PDB?
          I could etch it with a crow-bar onto the head of a pin.

          Reply
      • Gezza

         /  April 9, 2018

        Their successes so far and ahead are going to leave you battered and torn, like a flimsy rag caught in a gale

        Fair enuf. What are they? Can you list them please? 😳

        Reply
        • PDB

           /  April 9, 2018

          To be fair they have gone a whole couple of days since they put their own foot in mouth. Since JAG’s anti-old white men statement and Sage lying about who she met with (she confused two people – the one she said she met with but didn’t was a man and the other she did actually meet was a woman – easy mistake to make).

          RNZ: “It’s very confusing for her [Sage], because for her not to be able to distinguish between the chief executive of the EPA, a middle aged male, versus the chief executive of the Ministry for the Environment, a female, is beyond belief.”

          Reply
        • robertguyton

           /  April 9, 2018

          Thanks for your polite request, Gezza. Be patient, u 2 will c.

          Reply
          • Gezza

             /  April 9, 2018

            Dear Mr Guyton

            I have been patient. I asked yonks ago for your list of their successes so far. So far all you’ve done is blow it out your arse!

            I’m not interested in your list of their future successes as they could be failures.

            Just the list of their successes so far would be good.
            Thanks in anticipation of your speedy response & list.
            Yours, etc.

            Reply
            • robertguyton

               /  April 9, 2018

              Gezza – in an earlier occupation, I fed adults who were unable to feed themselves and thereby developed an aversion to spoon-feeding in any form. Please accept my sincere declination.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  April 9, 2018

              Fail.

            • Gezza

               /  April 9, 2018

              More farting does not impress Robert.

            • Gezza

               /  April 9, 2018

              More farting does not impress, Robert.
              (Just to be clear who I was talking to, Sir Alan)

      • David

         /  April 9, 2018

        “Their successes so far and ahead are going to leave you battered and torn, like a flimsy rag caught in a gale.”

        Where you this guy in a previous job?

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muhammad_Saeed_al-Sahhaf

        Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  April 9, 2018

      Two men and, one must assume, two wives or partners.

      Who are these two men ?

      Needless to say that I can’t think of any women who are rich in their own right off the top of my head, but there are plenty of them. Paula Ryan ?

      Mrs Davidson seems to have a very good opinion of herself !

      Reply
  8. robertguyton

     /  April 9, 2018

    Frame it how you will, Gezza, I don’t mind. I’ve no interest in feeding the rabid anti-Green appetite here with even the smallest tid-bit over which they can puff and blow but what I do want to share is my confidence in them and my certainty around what they’ve already achieved. Fail, Alan? Failed to provide a list? Sweet, I care not at all. To be clear, The Greens are reeling-in the successes, though they are invisible to you and I’m delighted to be able to report on their victories.

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  April 9, 2018

      Flatulental, until you can name the successes and how you define them as being successful.

      Reply
      • robertguyton

         /  April 9, 2018

        Let’s test the waters with one then;the removal of funding for large irrigation schemes such as that proposed for the Hurunui.

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  April 9, 2018

          That’s an achievement. How is it a success?

          Reply
          • robertguyton

             /  April 9, 2018

            They succeeded in implementing their promise.

            Reply
            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  April 9, 2018

              We never doubted they could be destructive, Robert.

            • Gezza

               /  April 9, 2018

              Ok. So on that criterion, you would credit the former National-led government with a lot of successes too, yes?

            • robertguyton

               /  April 9, 2018

              National succeeded in implementing many of their wishes, along with changing the tenor of politics in New Zealand, yes, Gezza. Isn’t that obvious?

        • PDB

           /  April 9, 2018

          Guyton: “the removal of funding for large irrigation schemes”. Wouldn’t surprise me if some of the Shane Jones bribe fund is instead used for some of this.

          How about that water tax then? Delivered on that didn’t they?

          Reply
  9. Reply
  10. Gezza

     /  April 9, 2018

    Please don’t read this comment.

    Reply

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