Legal ring fencing of the word ‘teacher’ proposed

It may become illegal to use the word ‘teacher’ unless you have a specific university degree – namely ” a three-year Bachelor of Education, a Bachelor’s degree with a one-year Diploma of Teaching, or a conjoint degree that combines study in teaching subjects with teacher training”.

This sort of silliness could be a coalition killer.

Newshub: Proposed Bill to restrict use of word ‘teacher’

A Bill which would make it illegal to use the title ‘teacher’ without a formal qualification is before a select committee.

Submissions for The Education (Protecting Teacher Title) Amendment Bill, fronted by New Zealand First MP Jenny Marcroft, closed on Friday.

It aims to “lift the status of teachers” by removing the ability of those without the qualification to represent themselves with that title.

“Clarity around the use of the title of teacher is essential in order to avoid any misunderstanding by the public about the qualifications,” the proposed Bill reads.

It would become an offence, punishable with a $2000 fine, to connect the word with any unqualified person or business.

Qualifications which could use the title are a three-year Bachelor of Education, a Bachelor’s degree with a one-year Diploma of Teaching, or a conjoint degree that combines study in teaching subjects with teacher training.

Those who aren’t qualified can still use the titles of lecturer, tutor or educator.

Educator sounds more school orientated to me than teacher.

I guess this is trying to emulate restrictions on the use of the word ‘doctor’ or the words ‘sir’ or ‘dame’, but it is risky using legislation to limit the use of such a widely used word like teacher.

National education spokesperson Nikki Kaye says the Bill “jeopardises many of our current teachers and early childhood teachers”.

“It has the potential to undermine and devalue our many educators who contribute to the wellbeing of our country.

“The impact of the Bill is not even isolated to the education sector. Are we going to fine every music teacher, dance teacher, and swimming teacher?”

“Even the Attorney-General has come out against the bill as it breaches the Bill of Rights, yet the Government continues to support it.”

But Ms Marcroft says it’s “nonsense” that there’s currently no differentiation between those that have “significant skills and training” and those who don’t.

“If we are going to have strong partnerships with whānau and communities to improve the educational outcomes of all tamariki, we must ensure the professional status of teachers is recognised,” she says.

“The Bill will elevate the public status of teachers and provide parents with a clear distinction between teachers who are fully trained and qualified, and those who are not.”

It’s highly questionable trying to legally limit the use of a common word used in a wide variety of ways.

Oxford dictionary: doctor

A person who is qualified to treat people who are ill.

North American A qualified dentist or veterinary surgeon.

A person who holds the highest university degree.

They are well established uses.

Oxford dictionary: teacher

A person who teaches, especially in a school.

That’s far more general.

This legislation seems to be a misguided attempt to fix a problem that doesn’t exist.

What about home teaching?

If the Government wants to assign a unique word to teachers they should make one up rather than legally ring fence a widely used and interpreted word.

Enough of that, now I must move on to teach you lot how to comment properly – perhaps you should have to be qualified?

Leave a comment

93 Comments

  1. artcroft

     /  April 16, 2018

    Indeed. If I say “My aunt taught me to swim.” am I leaving my aunt open to a $2000 fine? Should I now say “My aunt instructed me in swimming”.

    Reply
    • Blazer

       /  April 16, 2018

      only if you…drown.

      Reply
    • Zedd

       /  April 16, 2018

      Was your Aunt being paid ?
      I sure this is about the ‘Professional term; Teacher’ not a domestic issue !

      Reply
    • robertguyton

       /  April 16, 2018

      “taught” isn’t under review, “teacher” is.

      Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  April 16, 2018

        If your aunt advertised herself as a swimming teacher or instructor, I would expect her to have some sort of training.

        Reply
  2. David

     /  April 16, 2018

    Look its great the coalition is focused on the things that matter to NZers, this has been an issue far more pressing than faffing around with the 20% of kids that leave school with literally no useful skills.

    Reply
  3. Callum

     /  April 16, 2018

    The term registered teacher is already protected, why don’t the unions concentrate on promoting that? Same way certified builders, registered electricians and chartered accountants do. Doctor is a red herring, it is actually a generic term for a range of medical and non medical professionals. We have a health minister who is a Dr, but not a medical doctor.

    Reply
  4. Alan Wilkinson

     /  April 16, 2018

    It should be illegal to elect idiots to Parliament.

    Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  April 16, 2018

      The legislation could be redeemed by replacing the word “teacher” by “union fuckwit” wherever it occurs.

      Reply
      • Alan, I have given you an upvote for your redemption suggestion as it clearly and usefully touches a nerve, albeit perhaps not too elegantly. But then stabbing a nerve, even with such precision, is rarely elegant.

        Reply
      • David

         /  April 16, 2018

        Alan you are on fire this morning, brilliant.

        Reply
  5. duperez

     /  April 16, 2018

    I understand stuff like this having the potential to add to a package of coalition killers. It is perfect in that it is so minor yet can be built into another ‘this is the end of civilisation as we know it.’

    Reply
    • PDB

       /  April 16, 2018

      It clearly shows a govt who has their priorities all up the shit and are acting like they are still in opposition. Much like their spending budget with first year students, endless committees & Shane Jones getting billions of taxpayer $ to waste and then trying to blame National because the govt haven’t budgeted for ongoing public service costs to the point where they are trying to create an illusion of years of neglect by National.

      Reply
      • duperez

         /  April 16, 2018

        It clearly shows a govt who has their priorities all up the shit to those who think that there is nothing else happening. I’m not certain that is the top priority for the Government and/or they’ve got nothing else in train but I realise it will be top priority for those who want to attack them.
        Having an attack target every day is manna. Whether the attacks are mindless and manic is another thing.

        Reply
        • PartisanZ

           /  April 16, 2018

          Tau toko duperez …

          Regrettably, in this fucked-up Westminster system – to which the Fifth Estate of Social Media has now been added – there’s a very fine line between minor adjustment legislation – (which National became past-masters at hiding much more important changes inside of) – and “the end of civilization as we know it” daily attack targets …

          The thinness of that line is, IMHO, a measure of the IQ-EQ of the attackers … along with the declining relevance and applicability of the Westminster system …

          In watching the Health Select Committee the other day I was heartened by the ability to comment via FaceBook in real time and actually message the Committee, although replies to messages like “Could the MP regularly coughing please turn away from HIS microphone” weren’t responded to at all or until much later …

          Still, its movement in the right, socially progressive direction … Now if we can just stop calling it ‘Westminster’ and ‘Parliament’ and create our very own unique Aotearoa New Zealand versions of it …

          Reply
        • PDB

           /  April 16, 2018

          “to those who think that there is nothing else happening”

          What is ‘happening’ that hasn’t gone to a committee or advisory group (most things), has been knocked on the head (Kermadec santuary, water tax), has been blamed on the previous govt (lack of budget to give nurses a decent pay rise/ other unbudgeted public service running costs), or will happen some time in the future but likely to be changed when the opposition is back in govt (off-shore drilling permits)?

          Basically we are left with wasted taxpayer money (Shane Jones fund, airforce taxi service etc), more taxes, inept ministers and seemingly dodgy dealings & lies (Curran, NZL First blackmail, Sage, Labour party over sexual harassment claims etc).

          Far better for the govt to talk about who can call themselves a ‘teacher’ don’t you think?

          Reply
          • PartisanZ

             /  April 16, 2018

            So you’d call Genter’s/Swarbrick’s ‘Misuse of Drugs (Cannabis & Other Matters) Amendment Bill “government” legislation, would you?

            This despite it being submitted for ballot before the Greens became part of government?

            Sure, this government are delaying and putting things aside … just like National did with poverty, inequality, housing and a bunch of other issues …

            But I don’t reckon this is a government thing … Its a NZFirst thing … That’s the party who let their ‘Right Brigade’ down so badly at the election …

            Reply
          • PDB

             /  April 16, 2018

            No doubt Labour will vote in favour of it as will the Greens thus the govt will all be onboard. I’d be surprised if Labour and/or Greens oppose.

            Reply
          • Alan Wilkinson

             /  April 16, 2018

            Weird this got past Winston’s veto. I presume his vendetta against Seymour okayed it.

            Reply
          • duperez

             /  April 16, 2018

            PDB
            Far better for the govt to talk about who can call themselves a ‘teacher’ instead of other stuff? For sure there’s nothing else happening.
            I personally want them to get the whole country focused on one thing to the exclusion of all other things. It’s something important which we previously gave a little bit of attention to – changing the flag.

            Reply
  6. PartisanZ

     /  April 16, 2018

    Use of the word “lawyer” is restricted, isn’t it?

    “Registered teacher” is a good idea though Callum, along with Medical Doctor, Doctor of Philosophy or, like Muriel Newman, Doctor of Mathematics … just so there’s no confusion about whether she has any special qualifications in social policy … She hasn’t!

    Where people teach informally, leading wananga and workshops, the word “facilitator” or title “expert facilitator” could be used more widely, along with “instructor”, “organiser” etc …

    The proposed Legislation, I notice, is a NZ First ‘titbit’ no doubt aimed at appeasing some long-lost faction of their perceived voter base …?

    This is a waste of our Legislative Assembly’s time …

    Then again, so much legislation, debate and questioning is also a waste of ‘our’ time …

    Reply
    • PDB

       /  April 16, 2018

      MP’s should look in their own backyard first at the misuse of the words ‘Right Honourable’ for many of their members who are anything but….Winston Peters would be a good starting point.

      Reply
      • PartisanZ

         /  April 16, 2018

        You want Westminster? You take the Feudal Landlord, pseudo-Christian, Masonic Lodge bullshite that comes with it …

        Reply
  7. Any thought to flying, diving or any other sport requiring experienced ‘undegreed teachers’
    Another union try at relevance

    Reply
    • PartisanZ

       /  April 16, 2018

      George, I’m pretty sure the Education Act 1989 specifically covers only Early Childhood, Primary and Secondary education institutions in NZ … ?

      I honestly don’t think flying, diving, skiing, boxing, outdoor pursuits and myriad other sports ‘schools’ are affected.

      But perhaps they should call themselves something other than ‘schools’?

      You appear to be taking a rather reactionary “anti-smacking” line on this?

      Reply
  8. Pickled Possum

     /  April 16, 2018

    Teachers whats in a name???
    From January 2013 to February 2017, there were 26 alcohol or drug convictions, 24 driving convictions, three for fraud or dishonesty and two for violence.
    Of the six teachers referred to the tribunal, four had their registrations cancelled.

    One charge was unspecified and one teacher was convicted on a raft of charges which included aggressive behaviour, physical handling, offensive behaviour, violence, sexual behaviour or contact.

    https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/education/91489770/lessons-learned-more-than-70-waikato-teachers-have-criminal-convictions
    Tell me again HOW the fark being a teacher ‘with formal qualifications’ is going to make this better. Waste of money! Waste of time and Waste of space.

    Reply
    • duperez

       /  April 16, 2018

      That huge number of teachers in trouble might suggest to some that the ‘profession’ is in as much disarray as their registration and formal qualifications systems.

      I’m not sure what percentage of the teaching force show human frailties in those ways. (Any is too many.) You reckon they should aim for zero %? Or shouldn’t that be a goal because it’s likely to not be achieved? 😉

      I wonder how the percentage of teacher miscreants compares to that of the law profession with all its requirements for qualification and registration.

      Reply
      • PartisanZ

         /  April 16, 2018

        Goes back to the old adage for me … which I believe I coined …

        The problem with schooling is school itself …

        Reply
      • Pickled Possum

         /  April 16, 2018

        Duperez
        “That huge number of teachers in trouble”
        that is ONLY in Waikato over a timeline of 4 years.
        Could the teacher’s council keep some illegal behaviour
        but not serious enough to go to court? under the radar?
        Has only Court convictions reached the daily news?

        I know of a teacher who beat a school child on school grounds on school time
        but was able to get away with it because the child was the perceived problem
        and the teacher was a respected person who was battling depression at the time.
        That person is still teaching!!
        The undercurrent of violence in his spirit is unpalatable to me.

        A ‘bad’ teacher is as hard to get rid of as fleas on a pig dog.

        Not all convicted teachers make bad teachers,
        ‘who better to know the wheat than the baker’ saga some reckon.

        If you’re a baker, making bread, you’re a baker. If you make the best bread in the world, you’re not an artist, but if you bake the bread in the gallery, you’re an artist.
        Will context make the difference?

        Does the teacher that tried to used a gang member to coerce a parent
        to cover up her stealing, warrant the growling she got?
        and still went on to teach? prob still is.
        or should she have been throw on the unemployment heap?

        English words have a myriad of meanings
        is this is just a bill about something we can’t quite see at the moment.

        Reply
  9. PartisanZ

     /  April 16, 2018

    I wonder what this is really about?

    It’s NZ First legislation, so one would hardly expect it to be pro-union?

    The only form of school it mentions specifically is ‘Charter Schools’, which Labour-led are ‘assimilating’ anyhow … and which one would expect NZ First to support, surely …?

    Makes me wonder what affect it might have on Kohanga reo?

    And whether that mightn’t be the hidden agenda?

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  April 16, 2018

      God knows what it’s about. This government is a total head-scratcher. Callum’s “registered teacher” suggestion covers the situation I would’ve thought.

      Reply
      • Callum

         /  April 16, 2018

        Not my suggestion, it is in the. bloody legislation they are wasting time amending.

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  April 16, 2018

          Oh. My mistake. I’ll let Sir Alan apologise to everybody for my error. It’s his turn.

          Reply
          • Alan Wilkinson

             /  April 16, 2018

            Send in the pukekos. Gezza needs rescuing.

            Reply
            • Gezza

               /  April 16, 2018

              Christ, Al. You are absolute shit at apologising.
              No wonder I have to apologise for you so often.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  April 16, 2018

              You can be my permanent apology, G.

    • PartisanZ

       /  April 16, 2018

      I don’t even think it’s ‘government’ or ‘coalition’ legislation …

      It’s some kinda wonky NZFirst initiative … Be good to know when it was drafted?

      If submissions have closed, it’d be good to know HOW THE FUCK it ever passed its first reading …?

      Mighta been seen as ‘coalition affirming’ legislation, perhaps?

      Shit, there’s plenty of that going on!

      Look at the perfect ‘coalition affirming’ dovetailing of Labour’s ‘Clayton’s’ Cannabis Amendment Bill with the Greens’ largely realistic, decent and compassionate version?

      There’s your extent of ‘coalition affirming’ legislation right there! NIL!

      Reply
    • robertguyton

       /  April 16, 2018

      Kohanga reo has mahita or kaiwhakaako, not teachers.

      Reply
      • PartisanZ

         /  April 16, 2018

        I can’t definitively find information to confirm or deny that robert. Got a link?

        The Education Council certainly implies to me that ECE includes Kohanga reo and is therefore subject to teacher certification …?

        https://educationcouncil.org.nz/content/teachers-m%C4%81ori-medium-settings

        However, I also know from experience that it’s possible via distance learning to be studying for Teacher Qualifications and teaching in school at the same time …

        Where does THAT fit into all this?

        Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  April 16, 2018

          That’s like saying a bakery sells gateaux and not cakes.Or a bookshop sells printed material, not books and magazines.

          Reply
  10. Zedd

     /  April 16, 2018

    This is all about ensuring a level of competency.. in the Teaching Profession.

    When I was working in TAFE (Aust. Polytech) they had a category of ‘Guest Lecturer’ (often unqualified, hired for their knowledge/experience in a specific field) who I think, got a different pay rate.

    Just because you have knowledge of a subject, does not ensure you have the skill to pass that knowledge on to a class of students. That requires ‘further knowledge/experience’.. calling ‘TEACHING’ :/

    Reply
    • PDB

       /  April 16, 2018

      Maybe only call a person a ‘teacher’ if they are actually effective at ‘teaching’….I’m sure the unions will be excited to have this implemented and the teachers paid according to their ability or lack of.

      Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  April 16, 2018

      A bit odd then that University lecturing doesn’t require teaching qualifications, merely expertise. The more difficult the topic, the less difficult it is to teach it?

      What a load of cobblers. The best secondary teacher we had was a transfer from industry – because he knew and loved his subject. Some of the worst were the career teachers.

      Reply
      • PDB

         /  April 16, 2018

        A lot of it depends on the subject I’d assume? Some subjects require far more real-life/ hands on experience to fully develop understanding of the subject than that offered at teaching college and the like.

        Reply
    • PartisanZ

       /  April 16, 2018

      It just gets more and more bizarre …

      It seems incredibly UNLIKELY this legislation will change the availability of the NZ Education Council’s ‘Limited Authority to Teach’ provision, which allows non-qualified teachers to teach classes in schools and is, I believe, very important for provincial areas that can no longer attract registered teachers for certain subjects … along with urban areas where teachers can no longer afford to live … ?

      IMHO the word “teaching” and “teacher” is and must remain much broader than “registered teacher” or “person with a Limited Authority to Teach” …

      I come back to the question: What the f%#k is this really about?

      Reply
      • PartisanZ

         /  April 16, 2018

        Should read “allows non-qualified persons to teach …”

        Reply
      • robertguyton

         /  April 16, 2018

        Charter schools or any facsimile there of.

        Reply
        • PartisanZ

           /  April 16, 2018

          Natural ethics makes me an advocate of alternative ‘schooling’ and almost any educational alternative to ‘schooling’ that does no harm or that even does LESS harm than State schooling …

          It’s automatically implied: “The maximum of freedom for each, combined with the maximum respect for the life and freedom of every other” …

          The ‘modern’, slightly adapted Victorian factory-school is almost the antipathy of Natural Ethics …

          Reply
        • David

           /  April 16, 2018

          “Charter schools or any facsimile there of.”

          Robert, how do you, of all people ,end up at a point where any alternative to a state school system modeled on factories to produce state-approved pupils is something you are against?

          Reply
      • PDB

         /  April 16, 2018

        Appears to have been initially submitted due to some charter-school bashing and is now going through to somehow attract more people to become teachers.

        “Over the last few years we have had attempts to undermine the professionalism of teachers. Charter schools is one of the really clear ways that you can see that. There was the ability to employ unregistered teachers and yet still call them teachers in those charter schools. We don’t debate the titles of doctor or lawyer, so I think the time for ensuring we are really careful around the use of the word teacher, is here.”

        “Stuart said raising the status of the title of teacher is important.
        “At the moment we have a real difficulty in attracting and retaining teachers into the profession and part of that is around the fact many teachers don’t feel valued for the expertise and skills they have got.”
        Schools are reporting difficulty in recruiting staff.”

        https://www.newsroom.co.nz/2018/04/05/102736/protecting-the-title-of-teacher-could-breach-the-bill-of-rights

        Reply
        • PDB

           /  April 16, 2018

          To add: “Parker’s report said the restriction would limit the ability of people such as ballet or yoga teachers to conduct their business.”

          Reply
          • PartisanZ

             /  April 16, 2018

            In that case, one can only pray that the Select Committee process will sort out these issues … ?

            Select Committee is the only (potentially) truly sensible part of Westminster I can see – aside from the Party political infiltration so obvious from the likes of Matt Doocey on Health Select the other day … His questioning of ALCP co-leader Michael Appleby, a highly qualified lawyer, was patently Party-biased to the point of abysmal! He might as well have made a speech about donating to National at someone’s funeral …

            One can probably read the submissions? I’d be interested to know what teachers and other submitters had to say … but I’m not gonna waste any more time searching on it …

            If the idiots want to do this with our (so-called) democratic process … so be it.

            Reply
  11. Looks like they are starting to rewrite the dictionary. “teacher” is a very generic word. The word just needs qualifying further. Like “school teacher”. As mentioned already the term “registered teacher” already exists and applies to those who hold a piece of paper that says they received tuition in how to teach”. Unfortunately it takes more than a bit of paper and that tuition to make a good teacher. It takes a nurturing mentality as well for example.
    The problem with “registered teacher” is that the teachers have to pay a fee each year to remain on the list. Many did not bother. Better it was a normal part of the State’s Education system to freely maintain this list.

    Reply
    • PartisanZ

       /  April 16, 2018

      “Freely maintain this list” …

      Oh dear, did you miss Rogerednomics and Ruthanasia …?

      The extraordinary thing is that teacher appraisal didn’t get ‘devolved’ to Board of Trustee level?

      Very selective “freedoms” came along with the neoliberal paradigm …

      Reply
  12. David

     /  April 16, 2018

    It’s simply an attempt to turn teaching into a guild.

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  April 16, 2018

      I would expect anyone who taught anything like ballet, yoga or other things that need some skill to have some sort of qualification to demonstrate that they know what they are talking about.

      Reply
      • David

         /  April 16, 2018

        “I would expect anyone who taught anything like ballet, yoga or other things that need some skill to have some sort of qualification”

        A 3 year degree in Yoga? All this will create is a papermill to churn out low quality certificates to comply with a need for ‘qualification’.

        Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  April 16, 2018

          I did not say a three year degree, who on earth would ? Please don’t put words in my mouth,

          I said ‘some sort of qualification’.

          Reply
          • David

             /  April 16, 2018

            That is my point, if the law requires some sort of qualification, that’s all it will be ‘some sort of qualification’.

            Reply
            • Gezza

               /  April 16, 2018

              I think we need to be careful not to buy into this too far. It smells a bit like a right wing beat up of “faceless bureaucrats” in general from the sort of people who then scream blue murder about “the authorities” not doing their job when some unqualified person causes death, disaster, mayhem or financial distress to some rentier landlord.

            • Gezza

               /  April 16, 2018

              Aw sorry – wrong place. That was meant for Al, further down. Just to see what he said next.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  April 16, 2018

              Bureaucrats’ mission in life is to protect the incompetent from themselves thus ensuring they remain incompetent.

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  April 16, 2018

              It should have been obvious that I didn’t mean that someone teaching yoga would need to have a degree in teaching that would cover all aspects of teaching in a school and had nothing to do with yoga.

  13. Pickled Possum

     /  April 16, 2018

    Are the teachers going to be called Educators like in Amerrycar where the school ‘police’ have rights to treat an 11-year-old autistic child the same way they would treat an adult?

    “Kayleb Moon-Robinson —who is diagnosed as autistic— had barely started sixth-grade last fall in Lynchburg, Virginia, when a school resource officer filed charges against him. Kayleb was charged with disorderly conduct for kicking over a trash can and then with felony assault on a police officer because he struggled to break free when the cop grabbed him. The Center for Public Integrity analyzed national data and found that Virginia schools refer more students to law enforcement than other states and that nationally schools refer black and special-needs kids to cops and courts disproportionately.”

    Kayleb mother said,
    “Educators stood by, while the cop took her son in handcuffs to juvenile court. The officer filed a second misdemeanour disorderly conduct complaint. And he also submitted another charge, a very grown-up charge for a very small boy: felony assault on a police officer. That charge was filed, Doss said the officer told her because Kayleb “fought back.”
    https://www.publicintegrity.org/2015/04/10/17089/virginia-tops-nation-sending-students-cops-courts-where-does-your-state-rank

    Reply
  14. Pickled Possum

     /  April 16, 2018

    School where we send our children to get all the common sense educated out of them.

    Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  April 16, 2018

      I was fortunate to go to a school where half the teachers were mediocre but the kids were great. My children experienced two high schools, one which had great leadership and unfortunately one which had crap leadership. Two different worlds.

      Reply
  15. Zedd

     /  April 16, 2018

    As part of my job (Supervisor) I was required to run ‘training sessions’ for new staff & when new policies were released. My boss sent me to a course ‘basic methods of instruction’ to learn HOW to do it; prepare outlines, class notes & how to actually ‘teach’ not just lecture OR talk AT people !
    I certainly learned a lot from this experience…….. there are teachers & then there are Teachers (with a big T) 😀

    Reply
  16. Blazer

     /  April 16, 2018

    ‘those who can…do…those who can’t…teach’..Anon.

    Reply
  17. Alan Wilkinson

     /  April 16, 2018

    How occupational licencing harms the poor and blocks social mobility:
    https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/opinion/occupational-licensing-is-a-big-reason-the-poor-dont-become-rich

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  April 16, 2018

      This is NZ, not the USA.

      Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  April 16, 2018

        Why do you think the economic impacts would be different?

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  April 16, 2018

          First year of teritary study is free.

          Reply
          • Alan Wilkinson

             /  April 16, 2018

            No it isn’t. Just the fees. You still have to live – and have done well enough through school to qualify. Registrations apply to all kinds of non-professional work that keep the unqualified out permanently.

            Reply
            • Gezza

               /  April 16, 2018

              I’m sure it’s easier here. Would you trust your cars to an untrained mechanic, your house-wiring to an unregistered electrician, etc? I don’t know if you have to be registered to work at Maccas or Starbucks.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  April 16, 2018

              Yep, me.

              Registration means little. Competence and trustworthiness is much more important. Untrained people can learn on the job with proper supervision and management. Regulatory bureaucracy makes that impossible.

            • Gezza

               /  April 16, 2018

              Airline pilots?

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  April 16, 2018

              They learn on the job as amateurs and as co-pilots. They don’t walk into the job from training school.

        • Kitty Catkin

           /  April 16, 2018

          It may or may not be, but we do many things differently here, so can’t assume that they are the same.

          Reply
  1. Legal ring fencing of the word ‘teacher’ proposed — Your NZ – NZ Conservative Coalition

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