ANZAC Day 2018

25th April 2018 – ANZAC Day

ANZAC Day began as a mark of respect of the anniversary of the landing of New Zealand and Australian soldiers (Australia and New Zealand Army Corp) at Gallipoli in 1915. It was first marked in 1916, but since then has widened into a commemoration of Word War 1, World War 2 and all New Zealand military action overseas.

Most of us have relations who took part in the World Wars and other hostilities, and this is a good time to reflect on what they had to do and how many of them must have suffered – some paying the ultimate price, others returning with physical injuries and many with mental scars.

The post war generations are lucky to live in a time when there has been no compulsion to take part in armed conflict – the luckiest generations in human history

This post is for remembrance, family stories or whatever you feel is appropriate for the occasion.

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45 Comments

  1. Blazer

     /  April 24, 2018

    yes we will remember the needless slaughter…thanks Churchill and the empirical motives that ignited WW1.

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  April 24, 2018

      We must, though, remember the real courage of the ones who went, even though they didn’t have to, as well as those who didn’t try to get out of it when conscription came.

      One NZ woman died in action. A man’s world ? yeah, right. I’ll believe that women want gender equality when there are equal numbers in dangerous wars and women are conscripted, legally obliged to go and risk their lives.

      The person who made that little poster must have not realised that it’s a verse of a poem.It looks nice, but the words are horribly misplaced in a travesty of Binyon’s heartbreaking work..

      They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old;
      Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn,
      At the going down of the sun, and in the morning,
      We will remember them.

      Laurence Binyon ‘For the Fallen’.

      Reply
    • Trevors_Elbow

       /  April 24, 2018

      You cant stop can you BOL. Never. Not once.

      Just shut up and leave it alone.

      If you want to debate wars and their causes, ask for a guest post and separate it off. Actually come with something in depth and setting out a point of view – so the rest of this blogs readers can engage you point by point

      For some of us remembering the fallen and those who served is special and a time to think on peace. Not to have ideologues like you make it all about your ideology.

      You’ve been challenged – I expect you won’t take the time to actually have a crack and ask Pete for a guest slot…

      Reply
    • NOEL

       /  April 25, 2018

      When I was in Primary School the Gallipoli was promoted as some sort of great victory.
      By Secondary School revisionist historian were denigrating the it as an example of an ill conceived campaign.

      It’s the qualities of comradeship in adversity and heroism that is remembered today.

      Reply
    • Traveller

       /  April 25, 2018

      I feel disappointed but unsurprised that this contributor cannot respect those of us who value living in a country defined by the people who have fought battles for the freedom we have to express ourselves.

      Reply
      • Patzcuaro

         /  April 25, 2018

        Great interpretation of the fern

        Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  April 25, 2018

          I would bet that nobody here thinks that war is anything but a ghastly thing, the worst possible way of solving conflicts, started by those who won’t be fighting in them.

          BUT we do remember and respect the men who went and who died hideous deaths and those whose lives were damaged forever by what they experienced. I have heard old men reliving the Somme and the others. It was dreadful to hear, so what must those memories have done to the men who had them ? It’s all but impossible to imagine.

          Do I respect them ? Of course I do. I also appreciate the chivalry that men have; they go but we women don’t have to. Remembering the ones who went and died is all that we can do for the ones who went to the world wars.

          Reply
  2. Zedd

     /  April 25, 2018

    When I was in Aust. they had another line, at the end of the ‘Ode to the Fallen’;
    “Lest we forget” (repeated by the crowd) 😦

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  April 25, 2018

      “Lest we forget” was said at the Tawa ceremony.
      The crowd’s getting to young to know they should join in on the last “We will remember them”.

      Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  April 25, 2018

        They always do that here.

        The Last Post is the saddest thing in the world.

        Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  April 25, 2018

          I think that ‘we will remember them’ is repeated by the crowd. now that i think of it.

          Reply
        • Gezza

           /  April 25, 2018

          Nup. Sad, yes. But not as sad as the PDT, imo. >:D

          Reply
          • Kitty Catkin

             /  April 25, 2018

            One’s moving, the other isn’t, alas, but I wish that they WERE,

            Reply
        • I’ve played the Last Post. It’s incredibly poignant. It’s also beautiful in that it reflects not only death but also the hope of resurrection.

          Reply
          • Kitty Catkin

             /  April 26, 2018

            It is almost unbearably moving.

            The local cemetery commemoration has a piper who begins out of sight. Also terribly moving,

            Reply
  3. Gezza

     /  April 25, 2018

    Ok, no snarking, cos it was a long time ago and I was just starting out. This was my first attempt at songwriting with a four track.

    Whoops – interruption. Parade coming past….
    The village service here was very well-attended, with Police, Fire Service, Army, Navy, 2 Air Force, pipe band, bugler, glorious sunny day. Well planned and presented service. Main speech by a Medical Corpsman who served in Afghanistan. Life of one of our fallen from the Boer War told. This will be repeated every year now until 1930.

    Reply
  4. Traveller

     /  April 25, 2018

    “…….it was just war”. Your song wonderfully captures the way in which the human spirit survived and overcomes tragic events. Poignant. Thanks.

    Always struck at how small ANZAC COVE is. I took this photo 10 years ago

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  April 25, 2018

      I see the PDT 🙄 is off his meds again.
      God, there’s some !@$#%*! sad bastards about. 😕

      Reply
    • PartisanZ

       /  April 25, 2018

      @traveller – “Always struck at how small ANZAC COVE is.”

      Hence, as Noel points out, “an example of an ill conceived campaign.”

      Reply
  5. seer

     /  April 25, 2018

    Reply
  6. Kitty Catkin

     /  April 25, 2018

    PDT, you are a sad and soured person and I feel sorry for you. I don’t know why you’re like this, but I hope that you will seek help for it.

    Reply
  7. Jacinda said on 1ewes that is was “sumpthink special being asked to lay a wresth on behalf of all New Zealanders” 😐

    I honestly wonder if people who say things like sumpthink & ungyins might be a little deaf.

    Reply
    • PartisanZ

       /  April 25, 2018

      You’re talking about probably 50% or more of the Kiwi population Gezza …

      No wonder so many people relate to Jacinda …

      A PM who talks just like they do!

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  April 25, 2018

        We have a bigger problem with glue ear than I thought, PZ. Poor literacy & phoenetics education, too.

        I wouldn’t mind so much if she wasn’t going overseas and meeting foreigner leaders who speak English better, and mispronunciations like those didn’t make one sound as thick as pigshit.

        It’s the equivalent of a Maori saying Ay owe tee ah row uh.

        Reply
  8. PartisanZ

     /  April 25, 2018

    “Our boys across the barbed wire …
    Tempted … and snared …”

    Reply
    • PartisanZ

       /  April 25, 2018

      Gone the sun … from the sea … from the hills … from the sky …

      Reply
      • PartisanZ

         /  April 25, 2018

        To paraphrase Albert Einstein …

        “So long as there are irredeemable, intractable, irremediable men, there will be wars”

        Reply
  9. Missy

     /  April 26, 2018

    Well, as you are all waking up Anzac Day is coming to an end here in London, and it was (as always) incredible, but at some points rather surreal.

    For the first time the Paparazzi managed to get themselves out of bed and into Hyde Park Corner for Dawn Service. As they weren’t accredited media they came and stood in the public part, and some of them were rather disrespectful and rude talking the whole way through the service and taking photos – upsetting many who were there.

    Meghan appeared to embrace and appreciate the cultural aspects of the Dawn Service, (it was organised by NZ this year, so a very NZ flavour). This was a wonderful introduction for her into the culture and traditions of two of the Commonwealth Realms that she probably hasn’t had much to do with previously.

    I wasn’t at the Cenotaph Service, but did go to Westminster Abbey again (I love that service), and as we entered the Great West Door we had to run (for the first time ever) the Paparazzi Gauntlet, so a few of us turned the table on them got our phones out and started snapping with a couple constantly calling out to them to smile, look happy, look over at us, and to try to show some happy feelings. Let’s just say the British Paparazzi were not impressed with that! It was fun though.

    At the beginning of the Service when Prince William, Prince Harry, and Meghan arrived as the Dean was introducing them to the High Commissioners apparently the Australian High Commissioner suggested to William that Alexander might be a good name for the new baby, and then the Dean said that Jerry thinks the baby should be named Jerry, William responded that Jerry was a strong name. Are we in line for Prince Jerry named after the NZ High Commissioner? Most likely not, but a lovely bit of humour on such a serious occasion.

    The service at the Abbey was, as always, incredible, it is such an amazing place and it is such a privilege to attend services there.

    The services today in London received unprecedented Press coverage, mostly due to the presence of Meghan Markle at both the Dawn Service and Westminster Abbey, she didn’t attend the Cenotaph. Whilst the majority of the articles centred on Meghan’s attendance and were very tabloid, it was good to see some publications look more into the history of Anzac Day and the contributions of NZ and Australia to conflicts in the world.

    Reply

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