Open Forum – Friday

4 May 2018

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46 Comments

  1. sorethumb

     /  May 4, 2018

    Oaths and Declarations (Members of Parliament) Amendment Bill

    This bill amends the Oaths and Declarations Act 1957 to allow members of Parliament to make their oaths or affirmations of allegiance in languages other than English and te re Māori.
    ………………
    Supported by Labour and Green – Rejected.

  2. sorethumb

     /  May 4, 2018

    Removing English words from signage where possible and getting Maori food trucks out on the streets are some of the ideas raised for making Wellington the Te Reo capital of New Zealand.

    Wellington City Council is working to raise the status and use of the language through its draft Te Reo Maori policy, Te Tauihu.
    https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=12044369

    Only “boring bigots ” would object to that?

  3. lurcher1948

     /  May 4, 2018

    As I said in various ways Duncan Garner is a soul brother of Mike Hosking.Hoskings daily rant today was the right of BIG OIL to legally manipulate petrol prices and stuff the long suffering customer and half an hour later Duncan the soul brother said basically the same.The fact that BIG OIL advertises on their companies shows is no reason for suspicion

    • Blazer

       /  May 4, 2018

      I would not be surprised to see Mr Bridges working for a foreign oil company,after he fades out of politics.Key to an aussie bank,English to another aussie conglomorate…….big business looks after their ….friends.

      • Using that ‘logic’ will Ardern work for a media or PR company after she leaves politics?

    • Corky

       /  May 4, 2018

      What manipulation of prices? What has Megan Woods done about this situation? Why nothing..just like Mikey called it.

  4. sorethumb

     /  May 4, 2018

    Recalling Aotearoa – Indigenous Politics and Ethnic Relations in NZ
    Spoonley Fleras

    The sovereignty bombshell New Zealand’s vaunted racial harmony of the 1970s was under siege, prompting the Race Relations Conciliator in 1982 to describe the situation as a ‘time bomb’, primed to explode unless something was done to defuse the situation. But nothing could cushion New Zealanders against the bombshell that detonated in 1982, the reverberations of which continue to resonate to the present. Publication of Donna Awatere’s Maori Sovereignty in a series of three articles in the feminist journal Broadsheet (and in a book in 1984) has proven one of those defining historical moments that chal-lenged people’s perception of society in ways both enlightening and dis-maying. Awatere’s thesis was as blunt as it was straightforward: Aotearoa is under Maori sovereignty, and this sovereign Maori right to self-determination exists by virtue of unceded Maori lands and fisheries. Maori sover-eignty was never surrendered with the Treaty but was suppressed by a combination of Pakeha deception and Crown complicity. In rejecting the legitimacy of Pakeha occupancy or rule, Awatere argued, the days of White supremacy and cultural imperialism were numbered, as was its monopolis-tic control over authority and ownership. Pakeha who were willing to abide by Maori rules would be tolerated as a ‘regrettable necessity’; others were expected to evacuate Aotearoa since they had no business being on Maori land. Minimally, Maori sovereignty sought the end of Pakeha mono-culturalism and its replacement by a genuine biculturalism that ensured equal consideration for Maori in determining the course of New Zealand society. Alternatively, it demanded the acknowledgement of New Zealand as Maori land and its return to the tangata whenua. In the final analysis, Awatere concluded, it was not a case of sovereignty or no sovereignty as a basis for Maori survival, but that of sovereignty or nothing without sovereignty (Awatere 1984).

    • sorethumb

       /  May 4, 2018

      It is wrong to conclude that this was “Maori” reacting. Today we would call Awatere a “social justice warrior”. The same ideologies then as now, but now they are turning people off.

    • sorethumb

       /  May 4, 2018

      I didn’t realise she was the Act MP???? How embarrassing.

    • Gerrit

       /  May 4, 2018

      Not much has changed in 34 years. Anyone expecting change in the next 34 years?

        • phantom snowflake

           /  May 4, 2018

          What you doing? Someone else already posted this yesterday.

          • PartisanZ

             /  May 4, 2018

            If a Lobster has 1/3,000,000th of the brain capacity of a Human Being – which is probably being generous to the Lobster – and if it takes a Human Being X number of times to comprehend an article about Jordan Peterson: How many times does it take a Lobster to comprehend the same article?

            • PartisanZ

               /  May 4, 2018

              Yes, a lot’s changing … or alternatively a Lot (the Biblical person) is staying the same …?

            • sorethumb

               /  May 4, 2018

              but his point still stands and that is that hierarchies are a natural and necessary way for society to function. Hierarchies of competence.

            • phantom snowflake

               /  May 4, 2018

              but his point still stands and that is that hierarchies are a natural and necessary way for lobsters to function. [There, fixed it for you.]

            • PartisanZ

               /  May 4, 2018

              “Natural” up until now … and perhaps even “necessary” up until now …

              Stone once reached the same ‘tipping’ or ‘change-point’, then Bronze, then Iron …

              Human socio-cultural evolution, which brought about ‘hierarchies’, may have reached the ‘hierarchies’ change-point?

            • sorethumb

               /  May 4, 2018

              And mammals.

            • sorethumb

               /  May 4, 2018

              Last time we discussed hierarchy, Japan Rail came to mind as a hierarchy of competence.

            • PartisanZ

               /  May 4, 2018

              But there shall come a day when Japan Rail shall be viewed as the hierarchy of inappropriateness … moving scores of millions of people around each day to do largely meaningless work dictated them by money!

            • Griff

               /  May 4, 2018

              I think you miss his admission that those who reject hierarchy are equally as important to a functioning society.
              I have not bothered looking into his work closely as it seems to be used by the alt right in an aggressive attack on the left.
              The USA culture wars and the rest of their liberal conservative divide does not translate into our political landscape.
              Often republican supporters on NZ blogs ignore the overt religiosity of the American political system. In NZ the religion of a politicians is seldom mentioned. We have had more atheist or agnostic leaders over the last four decades than we have had openly religious ones. In the USA your religion is valid a political question. The same difference operates when it comes to sexual identity we have had openly gay lesbian even transgender MP’s who gained respect from both sides of the political divide.
              Our present leader is in a defacto relationship something that would make you ineligible for high office in the USA due to the influence of the religious here it is only a issue for a small minority of backward thinking weirdos.

            • phantom snowflake

               /  May 4, 2018

              Wot P-Zed sed!!

          • sorethumb

             /  May 4, 2018

            Gerrit may not have seen it.

            • Gezza

               /  May 4, 2018

              He may just be too busy working out a good rumour & a plan for spreading it?

            • sorethumb

               /  May 4, 2018

              He may be in the garden spreading manure?

          • sorethumb

             /  May 4, 2018

            money buys rice balls

            • Gezza

               /  May 4, 2018

              If rice would just man up itself it wouldn’t need to buy them.

      • sorethumb

         /  May 4, 2018

        Whatever the reality of race relations there is also an input from people of ill-will and their vision is sick.

        The Black civil rights movement gained momentum through the 1950’s and 1960’s and it was to supply Maori activists with a new rhetoric as well as new strategies. Interestingly, that rhetoric did not necessarily come from those black American activists. It came from the French Carribean in the form of writers and activists such as Aimé Césaire and Frantz Fanon.
        //
        It was a voice that took the arguments of an international politics of liberation : the Marxism of Gramsci the notion of hegemony the critiques of colonialism offered by Fanon and Césaire the liberation theory and the possibility of a transformative education of Freire and Illich and put them into a New Zealand vernacular.
        http://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/thetreatydebates/audio/2491827/treaty-debate-1-2010

        and revisionist historians who Michael King suggested showed bias.

      • PartisanZ

         /  May 4, 2018

        @Gerrit – “Not much has changed in 34 years. Anyone expecting change in the next 34 years?”

        Years are like days in this socio-political realm.

        I’m expecting monumental and important changes in the next 22 years leading up to our Bicentennial in 2040. Our impending Bicentennial is going to make ALL the difference, as it did in 1940 although then somewhat stultified by WW2 …

        Among those changes are a Bicultural, Bi-National or Consociational Constitution based on Te Tiriti o Waitangi and English law, but disposing of much of the garbage of Westminster … plus the first operations of such forms of government as it defines …

        This will, of course, make us a Republic with a new flag … Aotearoa New Zealand.

        Before that, a Te Tiriti o Waitangi consultation process incorporating elements of ‘truth and reconciliation’ … partly accomplished by the public opening-up and de-legaleesing of Waitangi Tribunal proceedings …

        Within 34 years (and hopefully a lot earlier): The development of a massive cannabis and industrial hemp industry – domestic and export – in Aotearoa NZ …

        Several things I don’t anticipate seeing in the next 22 or even 34 years are: 1) Autonomous Motor Vehicles, and 2) A four-lane Highway between Auckland and Whangarei …

        • sorethumb

           /  May 4, 2018

          Sounds like Catherine Delahunty would be involved in that?

  5. Gezza

     /  May 4, 2018

    Mike Hosking says companies are now being forced to prove their innocence when accusations are made & no longer get the presumption of innocence
    http://www.newstalkzb.co.nz/on-air/mike-hosking-breakfast/video/mikes-minute-there-is-no-petrol-scandal/

    • Blazer

       /  May 4, 2018

      is there anything Hosking doesn’t have the answer…to?

    • PDB

       /  May 4, 2018

      That is the world of today – being accused as good as guilty.

      • Gezza

         /  May 4, 2018

        Hasn’t it always been like that though? Jesus the Nazarene. McCarthyism. At least with Trump any exoneration will have been the result of a thorough investigation that left no stone unturned.

      • Kitty Catkin

         /  May 4, 2018

        Back to the good old days before the Magna Carta.

  6. lurcher1948

     /  May 4, 2018

    PG YOU down there in the deep south in BORING DUNEDIN ME as an old poster here in WELLINGTON im wondering it its worth posting as im feeling our love affair of the freedom of speech is working out too hard on your blog, DO YOU WANT AN ECHO CHAMBER like kiwiblog

    • PDB

       /  May 4, 2018

      What are you on about now Lurch?

  7. lurcher1948

     /  May 4, 2018

    I have had gout for a week and are feeling a bit weary and in pain SORRY PG for sounding aggressive so tired of been sore,have posted on facebook if i can put my running shoes on tomorrow IM RUNNING,RED and me

    • PDB

       /  May 4, 2018

      How’s your missus? Doing OK still?

      • Kitty Catkin

         /  May 4, 2018

        Gout has been a joke for centuries, but I know people who have it and I know what agony it is.I wonder if it’s time to change its name and get rid of the image of claret-swilling Colonels with a bandaged foot on a stool.

        Give Old Velvet-Ears an ear ruffle from Auntie Kitty. And, of course, give one to Jess.

        • Kitty Catkin

           /  May 4, 2018

          Tell Red that my Maltese stood up to a large Pitbull who jumped the fence and was seen looking through the clear glass front door. I heard mine barking, growling and snarling and came out to find him going ballistic. The pitbull wandered off after a while, it didn’t bark back at him. Brave wee doggy !

        • Gezza

           /  May 4, 2018

          Aw what the heck give yourself an ear ruffle from yaw old mate Gez as well Lurch.

  8. Kitty Catkin

     /  May 4, 2018

    I can’t remember who said that the chemical attack footage was in fact film of a dust storm. But the Indian dust storm looks just like it !

  9. PartisanZ

     /  May 4, 2018

    “The values of Domination, Individualism and Exclusion, what Laenui calls the DIE culture that predominated under colonial rule, have given way to traditional Hawaiian values of Oluolu (comfort, non-domination, compatibility), Lokahi (group consciousness and effort), and Aloha(inclusiveness, with a sense of humanity, love, caring). Laenui refers to this Hawaiian-based culture as OLA, which, he points out, is also a Hawaiian/Polynesian word for life and health.” …. ORA …

    https://wakeup-world.com/2018/01/30/we-need-radical-imagination/

  10. sorethumb

     /  May 4, 2018

    Patriarchy’s Evolutionary Plausibility
    One of the consequences of these evolutionary pressures has been the emergence of the social practices cited as evidence of patriarchy. This is because among the key mating preferences of women, across cultures and through history, has been attraction to male dominance (particularly, over other males), high social prestige and control over resources. Dominance, prestige and resources are competitive goods, only known to be possessed if they’re shown to be possessed. Given these female preferences, fitness enhancement impels males to display their relatively greater possession of these goods, compared to other males. Thus, even before our ancestors had social institutions, whatever might have been thought of as public space was going to be primarily occupied by males.
    http://www.michaelmcconkey.com/patriarchys-evolutionary-plausibility/