Media watch – Tuesday

8 May 2018

MediaWatch

Media Watch is a focus on New Zealand media, blogs and social media. You can post any items of interested related to media.

A primary aim here is to hold media to account in the political arena. A credible and questioning media is an essential part of a healthy democracy.

A general guideline – post opinion on or excerpts from and links to blog posts or comments of interest, whether they are praise, criticism, pointing out issues or sharing useful information

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28 Comments

  1. Blazer

     /  May 8, 2018
    • Gezza

       /  May 8, 2018

      L’Estrange Corbet said that discouraging reports such as these made her question her commitment to New Zealand, saying she didn’t have to do it.

      “I don’t have to support people here, I don’t have to give anything back, but I do it because I want to give back.”

      • Blazer

         /  May 8, 2018

        she has exacerbated the situation with her defiant gutter journalism claims.A mere oops WFU ,an apology and all would be well.What kinda dame is she anyway!Not a classy..dame,that’s for …sure.Wonder what exactly she is…’giving back’…not those big profits on a $100 T-shirt that cost her $5 +..that’s for..certain.

        • Gezza

           /  May 8, 2018

          Well, be fair. The well-to-do can pay top dollar for the haute couture crafted by artisans. The proles are still good for some beer money to be picked up from the lowly paid offshore elves. And if you don’t like it she can always move offshore & use other artisans.

    • Gezza

       /  May 8, 2018

      L’Estrange Corbet gets it wrong going full cookie monster …
      https://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/103708883/from-woke-to-woeful-worlds-explanation-falls-short

  2. sorethumb

     /  May 8, 2018

    GUYON ESPINER​: KEEP PUSHING THE UGLIES

    The issue with Māori Language Week, as many critics point out, is that it is only a week. What about the other 51 weeks?

    On Morning Report, that is exactly the type of question co-host Guyon Espiner​ asks. It’s the type of blaring absurdity he points out each day, if the language is only notable for a week it will never thrive. Which is why, since this time last year, the reporters on RNZ haven’t stopped signing off in te reo.

    “The cool thing about Te Wiki o te Reo Māori is you get an excuse to use it even more,” he answers. “We said, ‘oh we don’t want to just let it go’.” And so each year, Espiner​’s challenge is to add more.

    When Espiner​ first started his role, he immediately made an impact by adding longer and different mihis to start the show. That’s when “the ugly strand” of listeners get in touch, to tell him he’s “talking gibberish”.

    “Each time I push the boat out I get a wave of negativity… After a while, it seems to die off a bit. So, I think ‘OK, great. They’re ready to hear some more’.”

    Espiner​ admits his enthusiasm for te reo hasn’t been with him forever. At TVNZ he “didn’t do too much” but he wants his children to grow up with the language.

    It’s far easier to learn a language when “it’s in your face”, he explains. That’s where Espiner is, too. In thousands of people’s ears five mornings a week.

    “I do think, if you’ve got a microphone you should do something good with it along the way.”
    ……………………….
    Duncan Garner, an ex-political editor turned radio and television host, is not usually shy of airing his opinions. But when, to start Māori Language Week on Monday, he told viewers that te reo should be taught in all primary schools, that’s when Garner says people started to lose it.

    “When I spoke out recently in support of the language, I did so in a very very personal basis,” Garner says. The journalist doesn’t see himself as being responsible for the language, but his daughters speak it fluently.

    “I got emails that would be the most abusive I’ve received all year, from New Zealanders who effectively treated me as a war criminal.”

    His short editorial was not received well by many of the viewers at home, leading Garner to say he doesn’t think the audience will appreciate more te reo Māori in the media.

    https://www.stuff.co.nz/entertainment/tv-radio/96744611/broadcasters-reveal-how-just-saying-mori-words-correctly-can-be-controversial

    How come on one ar Red Radio gives Espiner a reprimand?
    Note NZF aren’t supporting compulsory te reo in schools – have read the mood of the public?

    • Gezza

       /  May 8, 2018

      Note NZF aren’t supporting compulsory te reo in schools – have read the mood of the public?
      Just targeting votes from an ageing segment of pakeha whingers. Usual story.

      • sorethumb

         /  May 8, 2018

        We are looking into a fog there: we do not know. Is this a cause for old Pakeha only. Our culture is our inheritance?

        • Gezza

           /  May 8, 2018

          There’s a whole generation of schoolkids coming thru who’ve been exposed to more Maori language cultural symbolism, customs & history from the Maori not just Pakeha perspective than we ever were. They’re used to it. While some will be getting ear bashed at home by white cultural supremacists, others won’t. Our generation will soon be dust. It’ll work itself out.

          • sorethumb

             /  May 8, 2018

            Our culture pisses all over “theirs”. Actually our culture is not just ours it is anyone’s who wants it.
            In the first half of the nineteenth century, however, individual iwi considered carrying their martial culture beyond the shores of New Zealand. At least three expeditions of conquest were planned: to Samoa, to Norfolk Island, and to the Chatham Islands, which did not become part of New Zealand until 1842. All these proposed expeditions were dependent on finding transport to those places: and that meant finding a European ship’s captain whose vessel was available for charter; or it meant Maori commandeering a vessel for the purpose.

            In the event there were no expeditions to Norfolk Island or to Samoa because the necessary transport was not secured. But there was an invasion of the Chathams Islands. Two Taranaki tribes then based in Wellington, Ngati Tama and Ngati Mutunga ki Poneke, hijacked a European vessel in 1835 and had themselves—a total of 900 people—delivered to Chatham Islands. There they takahi’d or walked the land to claim it; ritually killed around 300 Chatham Moriori out of a total of around 1600, and enslaved the survivors—separating husbands from wives, parents from children, forbidding them to speak their own language or practise their own customs, and forcing them to violate the tapus of their culture, whose mana was based on the rejection of violence.
            Was this a superior form of colonisation to that imposed by European on Maori? Did it respect the dignity and customs of the colonised? Did it acknowledge the mana whenua of the tchakat henu or indigenous people of the Chathams? It did not. It was what might now be called an exercise in ethnic cleansing. When Bishop Selwyn arrived in the islands in 1848, it was to discover that the Maori called Moriori “Paraiwhara” or “Blackfellas”; and it was to report that the Moriori population continued to decline at a suicidal rate as a consequence of kongenge or despair. Moriori slaves were not released and New Zealand law was not established on the islands until 1862, twenty years after they had become part of New Zealand. And it is that twenty years of neglect of fiduciary duty on the part of the Crown that is the basis for the Moriori claim to the Waitangi Tribunal, heard in 1994, but still not reported upon.

            Michael King

            For starters

            • Gezza

               /  May 8, 2018

              Our culture pisses all over “theirs”.

              Yes. That’s part of the problem. But only some of you have your dicks out. And a few are of them constantly urinating on ours. It’s very helpful. Pissing contests usually aren’t.

              You might not have noticed but we’re not burning witches at the stake, boiling people to death, flaying them to death, hanging drawing & quartering them n stuff like that now. Hanging rebels en masse. That’s not our culture but it was. And they’re not generally doing those things either. That’s not their culture today either.

              So you really need to catch up – quite a lot, I think. And put it away, instead of waving it around.

            • sorethumb

               /  May 8, 2018

              But “their” culture is derived from primitive times.
              Compare science to te ao Maori.

            • sorethumb

               /  May 8, 2018

              It is academics in the humanities who are claiming cultural relativism. Maori culture is an archaic culture yet it’s proponents claim it is equal to Western culture. Our culture is an evolved amalgam of many cultures (Greek, Arabic etc,etc and etc)
              He!!

            • Gezza

               /  May 8, 2018

              But so is ours. It’s the end product of thousands of years of absorbing stuff from other cultures. It’s still basically British culture here. American culture is different. What will Maori culture be in another 200 years? What will Pakeha New Zealand culture be in another 200 years. What will Kiwi culture be in another 200 years?

            • duperez

               /  May 8, 2018

              I’m so pleased my culture isn’t derived from some primitive culture. Or got to be what it is by evolving through interaction with other inferior cultures.
              The biggest achievement has to be how through all time it remained steadfast and escaped being refashioned, while staying so superior. Wow! 🎖

  3. Blazer

     /  May 8, 2018

    morena…sorethumb. 😉

  4. sorethumb

     /  May 8, 2018

    Willie Jackson responds to Kiwifruit industry labour shortage
    https://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/morningreport/audio/2018643910/willie-jackson-responds-to-kiwifruit-industry-labour-shortage

    Im baffled that someone who has spent so much time on air is so inarticulate.

    • Gezza

       /  May 8, 2018

      Willie’s a clown. He thinks he’s still on the Willie & JT show & everything’s a comedy & everything’s an excuse.

      • Gezza

         /  May 8, 2018

        He’s been exactly the same in The House. I don’t know what he’d be like to work with off air as a Minister, whether he can actually sit down & pore over details & read detailed reports & have sensible discussions and answer sessions with advisers & lobbyists. Maybe he can. But when he has to get up & speak, or go on radio, or tv, a torrent of often seemingly vacuous verbiage just spills out until he’s interrupted.

        So far, from what I’ve seen & heard, he hasn’t been able to bust out of his years of being on radio where he just had to fill up every free second of airtime with something so constant blather was his style & some people liked it because a lot of it was genuinely stuff that made ya smile. Good ol, Willie, sort of thing – just what I’d expect you to say! 😀

        They picked a media personality for their public profile & hopefully appeal, (same with Coffey), but now he’s a Minister. He hasn’t transitioned yet.

  5. Blazer

     /  May 8, 2018

    America land of the..free…

    • sorethumb

       /  May 8, 2018

      why does everyone want to get there?

      • Gezza

         /  May 8, 2018

        They don’t realise they’ll end up in prison in some states for the crime of not having any money to pay Court Fines that the state goverment is relying on to stay afloat. It’s a strange place but it looks great in the movies and Mar A Largo.

  6. sorethumb

     /  May 8, 2018

    Gezza / May 8, 2018
    There’s a whole generation of schoolkids coming thru who’ve been exposed to more Maori language cultural symbolism, customs & history from the Maori not just Pakeha perspective than we ever were. They’re used to it. While some will be getting ear bashed at home by white cultural supremacists, others won’t. Our generation will soon be dust. It’ll work itself out.
    …..

    Winery presents options to fix Te Mata Peak track
    10:31 am on 7 May 2018
    The winery promised to remove the track it created following a public backlash, including from local iwi, who were not consulted.
    https://www.radionz.co.nz/news/te-manu-korihi/356789/removing-the-track-is-not-as-simple-as-we-thought

    Campaign seeks funds to save Te Mata Peak track
    1:44 pm on 26 April 2018
    Ngāti Kahungunu and the Environmental Defence Society argued the path disfigured the mountain which depicted the reclining figure of an ancestral chief.

    An independent review of the non-notifiable resource consent process carried out by Matthew Casey QC in January heavily criticised the council for failing to fully take into account the cultural implications of its decision.

    However, the path remained popular with the public, and was being used even after it had been officially closed.

    Te Mata Peak Peoples’ Track Society was formed this month to represent the thousands of people who want the track to stay.

    https://www.radionz.co.nz/news/te-manu-korihi/356016/campaign-seeks-funds-to-save-te-mata-peak-track

    • Gezza

       /  May 8, 2018

      I’m sure it’ll all work out. Betcha.

      • sorethumb

         /  May 8, 2018

        To be honest I find it hard to take their beliefs seriously. I think it is just us and them and this MWV is our card to have it over them.

        • Gezza

           /  May 8, 2018

          Mine Warfare Vessel??

          Have you donated?