General chat

“Is there any way we could have a thread for the more lightweight stuff like music and general chat?”

Do it here. Please no personal attacks or bickering. Anything abusive, provocative or inflammatory may be deleted

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22 Comments

  1. phantom snowflake

     /  May 28, 2018

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  2. phantom snowflake

     /  May 28, 2018

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  3. Kitty Catkin

     /  May 28, 2018

    There are tuis at the bottom of MY garden…and one came quite close to me. It was so busy stuffing berries down its neck that it came within arm’s length. I could see its white collar quite clearly. Two rosellas flew across the street.

    I heart birds.

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  May 28, 2018

      I never thought to video the scene. 😟
      Went to the supermarket this morning for supplies & we’d had a bit of sleet. It sounded like really heavy rain started while I was in there, and when I came out – the car, the carpark & the roads were covered in thick hail. Drove home carefully as it was that thick it was slippery stuff. And standing on the hail-covered lawn in the freezing Southerly wind by the back door was this shivering, hungry-looking bunch of four purple-&-black stream urchins all looking up miserably at me.

      I sprinkled wheat on the ground for them & saw them picking through the hail looking for the grains. It was too tragic to watch – plus the wind was freezing – so I sprinkled some on the concrete as well (it blew away) and came inside. 😥

      Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  May 28, 2018

        SLEET in Wellington ? Noooo !

        It was brilliant sun all day here after a bit of cloud in the morning.

        Poor urchins ! No doubt they will find the wheat with their better than human sense of smell,

        We had a little Southerly on and off. Some people were dressed as if they were going on an Arctic expedition, but it wasn’t really bad and when it dropped, the sun was pleasantly warm.

        I haven’t bothered to put the heater on, it’s not really cold although frost is predicted as it was last night (didn’t happen, it drizzled all night) I did bring out frost cloths for the Cape gooseberries and a plant with a name like crassula. (I have never seen this written down)

        Reply
  4. Gezza

     /  May 28, 2018

    Brought to you tonight by Wellington’s famous Howling Southerly & Freezing Cold Duo.

    Reply
    • Conspiratoor

       /  May 28, 2018

      Don’t take this the wrong way G but that is a pathetic white blob floating in a sea of digital noise and darkness. Give this a go…

      https://www.popsci.com/how-to-photograph-the-moon

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  May 28, 2018

        Firstly, thanks for that. I’ll bookmark that & have a good look over it.
        Secondly, shut your face. Bastard. (No offence).

        It was the wind & moving clouds & colours & Jupiter (so bright) that I really wanted to capture – on a video clip not a single shot photo.

        There are various tricks and tips for taking snaps of my favourite astronomical object but I won’t ever buy a seriously expensive enuf camera to make an art of it.

        The problem with all the cellcams and even my mini zoom cam is they all have auto-focus and auto light settings. Pain in the bum when you can’t set them manually.

        Reply
      • Gezza

         /  May 28, 2018

        The thing I’m finding fascinating at the moment c is that there are other stars easily visible to the naked eye in the photo fields I’m taking, but my cameras can’t even pick them up. It shows just bright Jupiter is. It always looks yellow to the eye, if not the camera.

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        • Gezza

           /  May 28, 2018

          *just HOW bright

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        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  May 28, 2018

          Consider there are billions of stars in the sky but your camera only has millions of pixels.

          Reply
          • Gezza

             /  May 28, 2018

            Yep – sigh. First big buzz I got was looking at the stars of The Pot thru dad’s 7×50 binocs & then those in the handle – and discovering the middle one wasn’t a star: it was a white cloud of some kind – hello Orion Nebula. You soon get lost with binoculars. Stars everywhere.

            The Jewel Box just off Beta Crucis (Mimosa) in the Southern Cross was another happy little discovery with those.

            The best views of anything that really interests me come from hubble and other space or astronomical telescopes though.

            And the incredible variety of rainbow halos the moon gives off so often from here in Welly.

            Reply
            • Conspiratoor

               /  May 28, 2018

              I see beteljuice in that pic G. The orange giant soon to run out of fuel and blow to bits

            • Gezza

               /  May 28, 2018

              No I don’t think that’s Betelgeuse.

              The central parts of the cluster is framed by bright stars making up an “A”-shaped asterism.[8] The upper tip of this asterism is HD 111904 (HR 4887, HIP 62894), a B9 supergiant and suspected variable star. It is the brightest member of the A asterism at magnitude 5.77. The brightest star in the cluster is the variable DS Cru (HD 111613, HR 4876), which lies well beyond the A asterism. It is a B9.5 α Cyg variable supergiant with an average visual brightness of magnitude 5.72, but is thought to be a foreground object.[9]

              The bar of the “A” consists of a line of four stars. On the right (south) is BU Cru, a magnitude 6.92 B2 supergiant and eclipsing binary. Next to it is BV Cru, a magnitude 8.662 B0.5 giant and Beta Cephei variable. Next in line is DU Cru, an M2 red supergiant that varies irregularly between magnitude 7.1 and 7.6. The last of the four is CC Cru, a magnitude 7.83 B2 giant and ellipsoidal variable.[9]

              Each leg of the base of the asterism’s outline is marked by a blue supergiant star. HD 111990 (HIP 62953) is magnitude 6.77 and B1/2. The star κ Cru itself is magnitude 5.98 and B3.[9]

            • Gezza

               /  May 28, 2018

              Betelgeuse, also designated Alpha Orionis, is the ninth-brightest star in the night sky and second-brightest in the constellation of Orion.

        • Gezza

           /  May 28, 2018

          I should set up a camera on a tripod (mic stand) sometime & see what difference that makes. Mostly I just see something neat that I want to catch and try and hold the cellcam as steady as possible. Look at this smokey moon.

          Reply
        • Gezza

           /  May 28, 2018

          Reply
          • Conspiratoor

             /  May 29, 2018

            I see you’ve been over on the west coast pinching pipis again G

            Reply
          • Gezza

             /  May 29, 2018

            Sacre blue!
            Antilunatist!
            Astronomistine! 😠
            Vive la lune! 🌜 🌙 🌛 🌗 🌘 🌑 🌓 ✊🏼 👋🏽

            Reply
  5. phantom snowflake

     /  May 28, 2018

    Reply
  6. patupaiarehe

     /  May 28, 2018

    All the talk of astronomy & the hubble telescope above reminded me of this old favourite. Enjoy…

    Reply
    • Corky

       /  May 29, 2018

      Great cover picture.The alchemical symbolism shown here is germane to all endeavours aimed at discovering truth.

      To perform his transformation the alchemist attempts to understand and connect with the unseen reality behind the manifested world.

      Reply

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