Media watch – Monday

4 June 2018

MediaWatch

Media Watch is a focus on New Zealand media, blogs and social media. You can post any items of interested related to media.

A primary aim here is to hold media to account in the political arena. A credible and questioning media is an essential part of a healthy democracy.

A general guideline – post opinion on or excerpts from and links to blog posts or comments of interest, whether they are praise, criticism, pointing out issues or sharing useful information.

Previous Post

48 Comments

  1. Gezza

     /  June 4, 2018

    $30k for Obama’s chauffeurs

    Taxpayer foots bill for eight chauffeurs used for Barack Obama’s golf holiday here.

    Barack Obama’s NZ visit cost the taxpayer more than $30,000
    https://www.stuff.co.nz/auckland/104437322/barack-obamas-nz-visit-cost-the-taxpayer-more-than-30000

    Bloody Key! It’s his waster of a golfing buddy. Neither of those two sods is short of a bob. Why couldn’t they pay for themselves! We’d bloody have to!

    Bludgers, the pair of them! >:D

    • Traveller

       /  June 4, 2018

      A third of a back bencher salary is my context there

      #PeakPoliticina reached. Start with NZ and do a cull

      • Gezza

         /  June 4, 2018

        😳

        Wot? Neither of the beggars is a backbencher. More like backscratcher!

    • NOEL

       /  June 4, 2018

      Cheap Geeza when you compare with the new bludger couple who are destined to come here. Past visits bt that families member are around 30 million everytime the step off the plane.

      • Just a Key beat up

        • Blazer

           /  June 4, 2018

          History will show Key was NZ’s worst P.M.
          His legacy- selling NZ off to foreigners,destroying the Kiwi Dream and indebetedness for future generations to…repay.

          • Your abject hatred of him counts in as much as it demonstrates how polarising effective and great and beloved politicians are.

            (Cheeky question – When will the Ardern/Gayford clan be invited to spend the weekend with royal family? My guess – never )

            • Blazer

               /  June 4, 2018

              cheeky answer…not sure,but would they be in good company?
              Assad enjoyed his stay there….apparently!

            • Gezza

               /  June 4, 2018

              Blazer wins that one !
              You know it, trav. 😉

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  June 4, 2018

              Assad has changed sponsors from Blair to Putin so probably won’t be shacking up in the Palace anytime soon either.

            • Gezza

               /  June 4, 2018

              Just changed palaces

          • Trevors_elbow

             /  June 4, 2018

            You need treatment…. KDS has taken over your entire being… I pity you

    • David

       /  June 4, 2018

      And what did Hilary cost us ? Well she bought our PM a gift and we chucked many millions to her “foundation”.

      • Gezza

         /  June 4, 2018

        Another bloody outrage! Bludgers -the lot of them.

  2. Bad weather up north by the look of things.

    It’s been frosty mornings but fine days in the far south,

  3. Alan Wilkinson

     /  June 4, 2018

    Paul Moon eviscerates the Human Rights Commission on free speech and religion:
    https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=12063987

    Honestly, that pack of wankers should just be abolished.

    • Gezza

       /  June 4, 2018

      From the article:
      “Anyone hoping that the current purge of the Human Rights Commission will go far enough to flush out the hubris at its core is likely to be disappointed.

      Indeed, despite staff changes, and a damning report into its culture, the commission will continue with its march towards introducing a damaging change to our society: its plan to make what it calls “disharmonious speech” aimed at religions an offence.

      What makes this audacious and unwanted encroachment on our right to speak and think freely all the more insidious is that this proposed ban on “disharmonious speech” would not apply equally to the criticism of all religions.

      The open season on attacking Christianity, for example, would remain, with its followers responding, as their faith requires, by turning the other cheek. Instead, the commission is explicit that this proposed free-speech ban would only apply to the sort of disharmonious comments that are “targeted at the religion and beliefs of ethnic minority communities” in New Zealand.”

      You’re not wrong, Al.

      • PartisanZ

         /  June 4, 2018

        ” … proposed free-speech ban …”

        “Ban”? I would like to know what is meant by this?

        Can HRC actually ‘ban’ things?

        Don’t they spend their time making rulings and recommendations on ‘discrimination’ that has already occurred …?

        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  June 4, 2018

          Presumably they would lobby for a law change if they can’t find one already to hang it on via their interpretations.

          • PartisanZ

             /  June 4, 2018

            Yeah … Right … or more correctly ‘Right Paranoia’ …

            And this “proposed free-speech ban” gets enforced … How!?

            • PartisanZ

               /  June 4, 2018

              Oh yeah, I forgot, by the new State Agency for Censorship, which, via Centralized Super-Computer technology, somehow reviews and redacts all printed and new-technology audio-visual and written material before it’s “published” … and sends out ‘field operatives’ to silence ‘freedom of speech’ activists …?

              The real ‘Freedom of Speech’ activists are, of course, those in the Don Brash et al ‘Right Brigade’ …

              If only we’d listened to Allan Titford …

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  June 4, 2018

              its plan to make what it calls “disharmonious speech” aimed at religions an offence.

              this proposed free-speech ban would only apply to the sort of disharmonious comments that are “targeted at the religion and beliefs of ethnic minority communities” in New Zealand

              In other words I could be prosecuted for calling Islam a stupid religion which it is.

  4. Alan Wilkinson

     /  June 4, 2018

    Getting rid of schools – the ultimate mass production?:
    https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=12063813

    • PartisanZ

       /  June 4, 2018

      Excellent piece … “maybe the hardest part of learning something new is not embracing new ideas, but letting go of old ones.”

      I’ve been saying the same for many years … and for a long time on here … The problem with school is school itself …

      What to replace school with? The possibilities are endless, limited only by our imaginations …

      Start with play-based learning until at least age 7 …

      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  June 4, 2018

        The main problem with abolishing schools is parents. So the answer is more choice for those with the will and skills. As charter schools were trialling till the unions killed them or vouchers would offer if the Left would allow them. Because the essence of socialism is the right of Government to control every aspect of your life and to make everyone think the same, live the same and “earn” the same.

        • duperez

           /  June 4, 2018

          Yes, the main problem with abolishing schools is parents.
          Hill Cone wants alternative approaches where there are lots of books and art materials and mattresses for making into forts and the kids bright and delightfully eccentric.

          She then opines that there should be more schools like the one described but it would be hard to keep such schools afloat in the face of bureaucratic and financial challenges and realises why there aren’t more similar.

          Do most parents want schools where kids are ‘all over the shop’? Don’t most parents want compliance and conformity? Why the proliferation of school uniforms into primary schools particularly in the past 25 years?

          Do parents want to trust professional educators to come up with and operate ‘alternative’ programmes and approaches? When the overwhelming drive now is to control what happens in schools because whoever works there and the boards who run them can’t be trusted?

          The model Hill Cone talks about seems to be more or less the sort of approach of Summerhill School. Ironic to see that type of model put forward as desirable and worthy when everything put forward by governments here in recent years are diametrically different to that. Not just put forward but championed forcefully by their followers.

          http://www.summerhillschool.co.uk/summerhill-policy-statement.php

          • PartisanZ

             /  June 4, 2018

            It’s such a huge issue, with so much habituation and so many vested interests … and so many possibilities …

            Already there are dozens of Charitocracy child/youth ‘mentor’ programs supplementing school activity – one in Northland provides a single mentor for a child from 5 – 20 years of age – but they are all based around ensuring success in the traditional or orthodox educational and economic sense …

            It’s not such a huge leap to envisage those we presently call ‘teachers’, teacher-aides and mentors becoming mobile ‘educators’ encouraging and advising home-based family learning or neighbourhood educational clusters or learning-communities-of-choice … Indeed, its already happening in the somewhat ‘privatized’ realm of ECE …

            Educational ‘Plunket’ … (but without the past-present-day ‘control’ factor) …

            The old institutional ‘schools’ could become community resource centres, providing all sorts of things and involving all ages, perhaps especially facilities like science and language labs, art rooms/resources, ‘trade’ workshops, computer suites, performance venues, gyms, swimming pools, playing fields and gardens …

            Also, some of these activities, notably sports, could go back to being club-based or even workplace-based, as they originally were …

            Who knows … and we’ll never know until we try … or until society has evolved so far beyond the business & colonial administrative management, factory/warehouse model that it becomes impossible to sustain our already groaning, archaic school system?

            Could any alternative ‘system’ avoid becoming formulaic? Could it be economically more ‘productive & efficient’ than the current model?

            Can we change our perception to see beyond financial ‘productivity & efficiency’?

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  June 4, 2018

              Teaching is surely going to be radically disrupted by the internet. There is no need for limited local expertise when there is unlimited global expertise to tap into. Just free up the system with education vouchers and let the market sort out all the solutions.

            • PartisanZ

               /  June 4, 2018

              I suspect teaching already has been radically disrupted by the internet, in positive and negative ways …?

              “Vouchers” doesn’t seem like a bad idea, provided everyone has the same opportunity … I’d like to hear others opinions on vouchers?

              Might dovetail too conveniently with your “more choice for those with the will and skills” though Alan …

              And with a market-style approach this inevitably becomes “will and skills and money” …

              To which I’d counter, “more choice and encouragement for those without the money and supposedly without the will and skills”.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  June 4, 2018

              Vouchers substantially reduce the money hurdle for those without it. Since it transfers the funding from the institutions to the pupil it enables choice and innovation and will be bitterly fought to the death by the unions.

              The most critical factor is then parental will. Skills can be bought.

          • Gezza

             /  June 4, 2018

  5. duperez

     /  June 4, 2018

    Yesterday I heard a documentary podcast which (incidentally) presents a nice contrast to the world as it was and the styles of would-be USA President Bobby Kennedy and the incumbent.
    50 minutes long but I found it an interesting listen.

    “The Day Hope Died: Remembering Robert Kennedy
    Why did Bobby Kennedy leave such a lasting impression on US politics and society?”

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0688gb1

  6. Alan Wilkinson

     /  June 4, 2018

    At the risk of inflaming Griff and hazarding his future knighthood, the world is rushing for the exit as Jacinda mounts the stage:
    https://www.stuff.co.nz/environment/climate-news/104442923/saving-the-planet–and-the-great-paradox-of-going-green

    • Griff

       /  June 4, 2018

      Really Alan .
      You are easily lead my friend.
      In case you did not notice the entire argument of that piece crashes down when you look at what is happening here around you .
      We have a labor goverment who is shifting our country towards a carbon free future.
      Even you must be aware that national will not backtrack on what is happening in New Zealand.

      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  June 4, 2018

        Oh, I certainly recognise that Jacinda has mounted the stage. Just that her international audience is voting with their wallets which will leave a future government quietly closing the curtains and putting the chairs up at the back of the hall. NZ will go no further and faster than the rest of the world or that makes economic sense. The rest is just rhetoric.

        • Griff

           /  June 4, 2018

          ROFL
          Flyover USA A.K.A trumpie land is not the world Alan.
          I see your hero is trying to bale out the coal industry yet again.
          Way to go socialist market intervention to keep the money flowing to his donors .
          https://slate.com/news-and-politics/2018/06/trump-coal-subsidies-will-help-inaugural-fund-donors.html

            • Griff

               /  June 4, 2018

              I know its hard Alan
              Examine what you linked to with a critical eye and you might just wake up to the crap you are being fed.
              Spot the switch .

              Coal and nuclear plants are in trouble because across much of the country they’re having trouble competing with cheaper forms of electricity generated by natural gas and renewable energy.

              Renewable energy is “cheaper” only intermittently, and only because of massive federal subsidies and state renewable energy mandates.

              What happened to gas being cheaper ?
              Switch from the real problem for coal, cheap gas, to attacking renewable subsides.

              The question is actually the introduction of subsides to keep afloat uneconomic coal and nuclear plants.
              Only works on suckers who stop thinking instead believe what they are fed no matter how stupid.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  June 4, 2018

              I have trouble following your “logic”. The argument for retaining coal and nuclear power plants is the vulnerability of gas pipe lines to attack or sabotage. Nothing to do with whatever you are trying to say.

            • Griff

               /  June 4, 2018

              ROFL
              Yes Alan.
              Wanna buy a bridge mate?

              They already tried the same crap with a different excuse a few moths ago.

              It was turned down as bullshite then.

              The major security threat for electricity is to power lines not gas pipes or distributed renewable energy.
              You know all about that…. you lost power because some nut shot out a few insulators on the pylons up north recently.

              As to your link and renewable cost .
              More crap fed to the cohort of stupid rwnj’s to keep them ignorant.

              Its about subsidizing dying industry’s for his mates .

    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  June 4, 2018

      How is the poll going?

    • MaureenW

       /  June 4, 2018

      More about how Facebook shares your personal info .. personally I wouldn’t underestimate the power of those with the globalisation / open borders agenda and how far their tentacles spread