Report on preventing youth crime

A report written by justice sector science advisor Dr Ian Lambie, titled It is never too early, never too late: A
discussion paper on preventing youth offending in New Zealand, urges agencies to adopt “developmental
crime prevention” model.


Principal Youth Court judge welcomes new report on tackling youth crime

A report on addressing youth crime in New Zealand is a blueprint for change that needs to involve all agencies
and communities, says Principal Youth Court Judge John Walker.

The report found the number of offenders in the youth-justice system is decreasing, but more needed to be
done to understand youth offending.

“With its focus on rehabilitation, reintegration and restorative justice, the report highlights that New Zealand
has an innovative youth justice system that works well to address offending by people aged 14 to 17.

“However, if we really want to be serious about getting to the root causes of youth crime, it shows we need to
tackle those issues when they’re children, not when they turn up in the youth justice system at 14. Too often
in the Youth Court we’re playing “catch up”, dealing with long standing issues that could have been addressed
many years before.”

A key issue the report highlights is that the causes of youth crime are intergenerational and linked to problems
within families and communities, Judge Walker says.

“When the research shows that 80 percent of child and young offenders grow up in homes where family
violence is present, breaking this cycle of violence from one generation to another is critical.

“To address the underlying issues and the well-entrenched behaviours we see in young people and young
adults, we must target every point in the timeline. We need to be pre-emptive, responsive, and adopt longterm
strategies.

“Regular visits to check on the health of toddlers, programmes to help parents and address the mental health
of mothers, tackling challenging behaviour by children and supporting early childhood centres and schools are
just some of the options the report highlights for addressing the issues that lead to youth offending.”

Judge Walker says young people do not grow up in a vacuum.

“Communities play an integral role in providing the framework within which young lives can be
reclaimed. What this report pinpoints is that change does not happen just by what we do, but by what
we do alongside others.”

Leave a comment

17 Comments

  1. NOEL

     /  June 14, 2018

    Might want to ask himself why only a small percentage of victims attend family group conferences.

    Reply
  2. Alan Wilkinson

     /  June 14, 2018

    Children totally embedded in dysfunction can really only be rescued by removing them from that perpetual disaster. Maybe time to sponsor boarding schools for them. In the UK they are saying this is a better and cheaper solution than traditional welfare.

    Reply
    • Blazer

       /  June 14, 2018

      Sounds like a project worth a try..Al.

      Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  June 14, 2018

        I suspect that little S, whom my mother hoped would break free from the family profession of crime, would have benefitted from this.

        Reply
    • except these vulnerable kids would invariably end up butt***** by a predatory adult, catholic priest etc

      Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  June 14, 2018

        Not inevitable. Both CBHS and CC had boarding pupils and I am unaware of any accusations of sexual assaults on them by staff.

        Reply
  3. High Flying Duck

     /  June 14, 2018

    This report seems to advocate for exactly the policies Bill English put in place around social investment that have been wholesale dismantled by the Labour Party.

    Reply
    • Blazer

       /  June 14, 2018

      a very charitable interpretation of English’ plan which is really nothing…new at all.

      Reply
      • Trevors_Elbow

         /  June 14, 2018

        EDS on display… AGAIN. You really need to get out and stop fixating on the ‘bad men’, the wick triumvirate of English, Key and Joyce…. Its quite pathetic you absolute refusal to see any good in English’s work around targeted help for those in real, desperate, genuine need…

        Your Marxist glasses are dragging your entire brain down in to the swamp of near insanity…

        Reply
        • Blazer

           /  June 14, 2018

          ‘ the wick triumvirate of English, Key and Joyce’…you forgot the 4th horseman…Brownlee…now ‘solitaires the only game…in…’ 😉

          Reply
      • High Flying Duck

         /  June 14, 2018

        Social investment was absolutely new and innovative. It mirrored the calls in the above report almost exactly – target at risk families and provide support at the earliest life stages to break prevent problems emerging.

        Labour believe this is stigmatising and so should not be done.

        Social investment:

        “Social Investment is about improving the lives of New Zealanders by applying rigorous and evidence-based investment practices to social services.

        It means using information and technology to better understand the people who need public services and what works, and then adjusting services accordingly. What is learnt through this process informs the next set of investment decisions.

        Much of the focus is on early investment to achieve better long-term results for people and helping them to become more independent. This reduces the number of New Zealanders relying on social services and the overall costs for taxpayers.

        Social Investment puts the needs of people who rely on public services at the centre of decisions on planning, programmes and resourcing, by:

        – Setting clear, measurable goals for helping those people;
        – Using information and technology to better understand the needs of people who rely on
        social services and what services they are currently receiving;
        – Systematically measuring the effectiveness of services, so we know what works well and
        what doesn’t;
        – Purchasing results rather than specific inputs, and moving funding to the most effective
        services irrespective of whether they are provided by government or non-government
        agencies.

        The way in which these principles are implemented will vary, and may include:

        * a particular focus on vulnerable or high-risk groups;
        * investing up-front to support people most at risk of poor outcomes later on in life;
        * greater input from outside the public sector in analysis, innovation and service provision;
        * working with local organisations to commission services within communities;
        * new citizen-centred services that cut across existing departmental service channels; and
        * interacting with each household through a single trusted relationship.”

        Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  June 14, 2018

          Who has never read a book under the desk ? Playing a card game for a few minutes is no worse than that.

          Reply
  4. Blazer

     /  June 14, 2018

    verbose waffle….simplicity mon ami ,simplicity….

    Reply
    • High Flying Duck

       /  June 14, 2018

      If you are replying to the above, it is a cut and paste of the Treasury page on the policy.

      Reply
      • Blazer

         /  June 14, 2018

        I am available as a consultant to review and assess any social investment initiatives.
        I will only charge around 500k for a report.Keep that confidential though ,would you.

        Reply
  5. Gezza

     /  June 14, 2018

    Good parents, good neighbours, good Plunket nurse system.

    Reply

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