Remarkable admissions from Police Minister Nash

The Government has already received growing criticism for arrogance unusual this early in a first term, and have been already shown to have ignored or not south advice before making important decisions on a number of occasions.

So Minister of Police Stuart Nash’s brash admissions yesterday in Parliament are remarkable in their arrogance and lack of attention paid to advice.

NZH: Police Minister Stuart Nash admits he didn’t read advice on phasing rollout of new police

Police Minister Stuart Nash has admitted he didn’t read official advice on options for phasing in 1800 new police officers over five years.

The Government says it will deliver 1800 new officers over three years. There are concerns that will put more pressure on the prison system.

Nash was questioned on the advice from police by National’s Chris Bishop in a a parliamentary committee on Thursday. He responded:

“I didn’t read any paper that said phasing in over five years. For me, phasing in over five years was just not an option I was prepared to consider.”

“I don’t read papers like that because there is a coalition promise that I will work to deliver. Any paper, any suggestion, that we are not going to meet our coalition deal of 1800 police over three years, certainly one that suggests its going to take five years, I’m just not even interested in seeing.”

Bishop: “You are kidding? Are you seriously saying to the committee that you received a paper about phasing options for the coalition commitment that you are talking about and you didn’t read it?”

“Not even interested,” Nash responded.

Nash said he had not ignored that advice but preferred police advice over that of Justice and Corrections.

“We get advice from all over the place … you have to make a decision on whether you take that advice or whether you take other advice.

“On the balance of probabilities I’ve taken police advice over Justice and Corrections advice.”

Nash said he “absolutely believed” that more police would reduce crime and the number of people in prison.

This looks like another policy that the Government are pushing rejecting any advice warning of potential issues.

The odds are that some Ministers will end up implementing policies that improve things, but there are also high chances of ignored consequences.

I wouldn’t be surprised if this came up again in Question Time today. (As ‘Albert’ noted this won’t be happening today. It’s Friday – my head was still in Thursday when wrote that).

 

 

 

25 Comments

  1. Albert

     /  June 15, 2018

    I would be surprised if there was a question time on a Friday.

    Good to see you checking things out here this early in the day.

  2. Blazer

     /  June 15, 2018

    Nash is correct in saying he can accept or reject advice.Nothing unusual about that at all.
    The previous administration is on record expressing their disdain for Treasury advice,as well as dismissing expert reports as ‘old’ and irrelevant.

    • High Flying Duck

       /  June 15, 2018

      It’s hard to “accept or reject” before you even read the advice.

      • Blazer

         /  June 15, 2018

        always reject unwelcome advice.As O.W said…’the only thing you can do with good advice…is pass it on to someone else…it is never of any use to one'(paraphrase)

        • Kitty Catkin

           /  June 15, 2018

          How did he know what sort of advice it was, unless he’s psychic ?

          • Kitty Catkin

             /  June 15, 2018

            He must be able to skim read and go quickly down it to see what’s in it.Then he could dismiss it.

  3. NOEL

     /  June 15, 2018

    Isn’t Davis the Corrections Minister?

  4. Gezza

     /  June 15, 2018

    Police Commissioner Mike Bush got a couple of sound bites on 1ewes at 6 last night, I think in the item about Kelvin Davis saying prisoners could sleep on mattresses in prison gymnasiums if there were not enough prison beds.

    He was obviously asked whether the extra 1800 police would mean more arrests & thus more prisoners and was saying he was confident better policing would mean fewer prisoners, from memory. So I took it police are likely to be charging fewer perps.

    • Kitty Catkin

       /  June 15, 2018

      I hope that he meant that they’d be stopping it before it started (crime)

  5. PDB

     /  June 15, 2018

    “Nash said he “absolutely believed” that more police would reduce crime and the number of people in prison.”

    If the new police were doing their job the prison population would initially sharply rise then (if criminals did actually stop committing crimes because they deemed it too risky) would taper off over time – a sharp rise that the new govt is not prepared for.

    At least bedding places would make a killing: Kelvin Davis: “One option for prisons is “mattresses on the floor””.

    Worst NZ govt in decades, if not all time.

    • Kitty Catkin

       /  June 15, 2018

      I am not sure that it’s only the worst NZ government of all time !

  6. Blazer

     /  June 15, 2018

    A Police man on the beat,actually walking reduces crimes like burglary …shoplifting ,bigtime.Old fashioned though.

    • Gezza

       /  June 15, 2018

      Yes, that’s my assumption. Community policing & community police stations where the locals get to know & like the local coppers is better than having them cruising round in cars & only turning up to break up gang fights or haul off domestic violence perpetrators.

      • Kitty Catkin

         /  June 15, 2018

        Cars mean that they can whizz off to a nearby street much faster than the old-fashioned bobby on the beat can. They can also cruise around far more places.

        The bobby on foot would be better for the business areas.

        • Gezza

           /  June 15, 2018

          I’m not saying take them out of cars – I’m saying cars-only policing makes them too remote. If you want to stop burglaries & car thefts & dairy robberies & meth labs & purse snatchers & antisocials like taggers (who cost thousands to tidy up afterwards) you need to convince people that telling a local police officer will result in some immediate action to catch them in the act.

          Shutting down Community Police Stations to save money is crappy policy. Trying to get police onto a local criminal or vandalism act as it’s happening via a national comms centre is a pain in the arse. You’re trying to get a car there NOW & they’re trying to get all YOUR feckin details.

          • Kitty Catkin

             /  June 15, 2018

            Ring the local copshop…if you still have one.

            I CAN see the virtues of national 111 centres, but dear me, on the odd occasion when one has a dimwit on the other end it’s maddening. One of these couldn’t find Hamilton’s Garden Square on a map even when I told him the streets around it, the bloody fool.I can see why they want to know who YOU are in case they need you again, and most of them are perfectly efficient.

            The problem with both foot and car patrols is that they can’t be in every place where something’s happening. Better heads than ours have probably struggled with this one :-/

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  June 15, 2018

              A cop car happened to pass as I was ringing them to tell about what I was afraid was a domestic with the girl getting the worst of it. I jumped up and down and flagged them down and the car did a U turn. The people must have wondered how the hell a couple of police had turned up so fast.

            • Gezza

               /  June 15, 2018

              10 years ago at 10pm there was one 2-cop Incident Car covering the entire area from Plimmerton to Johnsonville.

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  June 15, 2018

              ???

            • Gezza

               /  June 15, 2018

              Look at that area on a google map. So if you were reporting a local incident that needed police there right away – the odds were that they’d already be at an incident somewhere else & you were wasting your time.

              As I did twice. The second time, someone was crashing a stolen car into the side of a commercial building, then trashing the seats & setting fire to it as I was watching, & I said forget it, they’re too far away for me to give you any useful description, there were 5 of them, they’ve just split up & walked off.

            • PDB

               /  June 15, 2018

              We don’t need more police we need more………mattresses

        • Gezza

           /  June 15, 2018

          Ring the local copshop…if you still have one.
          No, we don’t. We used to have a Community Constable. I thought we had very little crime in the local district, but then I noticed the local free Kapi Mana rag which covers the Porirua, Tirahi Bay, Paremata, Plimmerton, & Tawa and a few other areas used to publish details of local criminal activity every fortnight – when we had Community Police. And that was quite an eye opener, especially when you’d see details of burglaries & theft ex-car etc in your own street, which you otherwise had no idea were happening all the time. We have a few local crims but often it’s low-lifes coming from Porirua. They stopped publishing this info when the Community Constables were dispensed with.