TE UPOKO-O-TE-IKA

Wellington’s daily newspaper has been running under a different name for the last week and a bit.

Embracing te reo at a symbolic level is one thing. Catering for a target marker is another. Perhaps they surveyed customers and got an indication that this would be popular, but newspapers are struggling to not drop their circulation too much and struggling to make money. This is risky – if they miss out on sales because people don’t recognise what newspaper is for sale, and if the precipitate more losses in circulation, it will be hard for them to get them back.

They do still call themselves the Dominion Post in the small print at the base of the Stuff website pages.+

The Dom Post circulation was down 10% in the year to 31 March 2018, to about 44,000 copies – details here.

 

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32 Comments

  1. chrism56

     /  June 25, 2018

    I am a Dom Post subscriber but looking at dropping it – not because of the letters on the masthead, but because there is so little news in it. Most seems to be either reprints of stuff I read elsewhere or opinion pieces by people who can’t even get basic facts right. I am old-fashioned enough to know that much of the “news” is just drivel about celebrities or speculation that have no factual basis. Didn’t help going to tabloid format with the mentality to match. The puzzles page is the now the most important one.
    That is why circulation is dropping.

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  June 25, 2018

      The name change is silly from a commercial point of view. I subscribe to The Listener whose name was obviously given to it when the only form of broadcasting was radio and which now still has television and radio listings but is mainly articles. But if it suddenly changed its name to something quite different, and particularly a Maori name, it would certainly affect sales. People would probably think that the shop no longer sold it,. I would assume that a magazine with a Maori name was like Mana and others of that kind. The Australian Women’s Weekly is now monthly, but has kept the old name.

      Reply
  2. Trevors_Elbow

     /  June 25, 2018

    The Dominion was almost mandatory reading when I started work a long time ago in Wellington.

    It has morphed over the years to be more and more Left leaning… and has become more and more tabloid.

    Used to have some very well research in depth investigative journalism… now its just fit for outer wrapper for the fish n chips…

    Its dying and if it wasn’t lying around in cafes I wouldn’t read it anymore…

    A great pity to see a bastion of Wellington life dying on the vine, but the move online plus its dreadful editorial style is killing it as surely as paraquat on a plant

    Reply
  3. George

     /  June 25, 2018

    Worked in the pressrooms of the Evening Post and the Waikato Times. And the daily runs back then were at least double what they are now.
    And the long deceased Truth and the Auckland Star.
    And the current crop going tabloid gives an indication of the quality therein

    Reply
    • PartisanZ

       /  June 25, 2018

      It’s because we can get … and share … so much better quality opinion on here!

      Reply
  4. sorethumb

     /  June 25, 2018

    Food for Thought

    Paul Spoonley
    Audio 31 Jan 2010
    Paul Spoonley talks about the New Zealander of the 21st century, and the great tussle between biculturism and multiculturism. AUDIO

    Chris Laidlaw.
    How would you define a 21st Century New Zealander
    Spoonley
    Well that’s not an easy one at all. Um I think we’ve [they] been remaking ourselves [unmandated] through the 1970’s and 80s. And what it’s thrown up is that we’ve moved away from that colonial past where we were (essentially) monoculturural and monolinguial and we’re moving into this 21st century. Now weve got partly a base in terms of biculturlism . The, really the unaddressed question is multiculturalism. So I would see the New Zealander of the 21st century as much more bi or multicultural, much more bi or multilingual . And of course what we need to recognize is the tendency of New Zealanders to migrate themselves [it still home though in most cases] We’ve got one of the largest diasporas in the world. It might be that the New zealander in the 21st century might not be resident in NZ for example.

    Laidlaw
    The big question seems to have been in the last 20 years is hat we have been so preoccupied with biculturalism that we have forgotten about the multicultural. The latter has been too hard because the former hasn’t been dealt with. How true is it.

    Spoonley
    Well I think it’s absolutely true, because if you look at similar countries to NZ such as Australia and Canada, they’ve developed multicultural policies in the 1970’s We ofcourse began to investigate biculturalism and we invested a lot in that activity and I think weve done reasonably well. But what it has done is multiculturalism which is asian and Pacific migration these days hasn’t really been addressed. One thing we havent got right is how immigrants fit into that discussion.

    Soft idea of citizenship. Australia tightened up , we (meaning him) are quite relaxed about citizenship. Immigrants quite like that in many ways. Yes I’m sure they do.
    Samoan over stayer took a case to the Privy Council Samoans where NZ citizens. Spoonley thinks dual citizenship is a good thing as people keep trans national linkages. An advantage in attracting people to this country. Japanese ask “how do you convey a sense of national identity and citizenship in your country. We Dont. Do you have many flags? “We don’t really”. Do you have an oath. Do you say something at the beginning of the school day?” We don’t do that either. So what’s the evidence of nationanlity in your country and how do you convey that to the immigrants who are coming in? We don’t [Laidlaw and Spoonley chuckle] Some people might see that as a negative, I personally see that as a positive.

    Reply
  5. sorethumb

     /  June 25, 2018

    Cont.
    Laidlaw
    but it has some of it’s origins in the whole question of crown versus Maori? In the notion that some form of sub nationalism occurs, here and therefore the broader nationalism is a harder thing to define.

    Spoonley
    Absolutely. I think one of the most powerful books in to be produced in New Zealand in the last thirty years was the Donna Awatere book on Maori sovereignty. And the point that I made in the te Papa lectures the other night was that you could divide sovereignty. The assumption always was that you had citizens , the nation was equivalent to a state. You owed your loyalty to that state. But somehow if you could divide the soveriegnty of that sate and give a little bit of it to Maori is a very radical idea. And if you think about that in terms of liberal democracies around the world, very few countries have actually taken that step and done that. Now admittedly the in the UK they have Scotland sovereignty has been subdivided, and that has implications for national identity as well.

    Laidlaw
    If you look at Scotland (and Wales as well) the fear in Westminister is this sub nationalism becoming nationalism. In it’s own rights (in other words independence) . I suppose the same fear exists here when we talk about Maori subnationality. Theres parrallels there.

    Spoonley
    Yes there is and sometimes you get some sort of extreme comments about what Maori soveriegnty might mean for New Zealand. But what youve got to acknowlege is over the last 3 decades we have been discussing this the people taking part in this disscusion have by ad large taken a very reasonable view. So the things we still hold important to this country (like Parliament for example) Yes we’ve modified with MMP but we still acknowlege the importance of a democratic process and of elected MP’s making decisions on our collective behalf. That hasn’t behaved signifficantly as an institution. So I think we’ve got things (whatever our political persuasion) we continue to recognize. And I think we have to recognize the good sense of these people who have been conducting these conversations.

    Laidlaw:
    Your right, while sub nationalism may seem clunky and get various reactions, it has proceeded at a steady pace. The question is can you have fully fledged biculturalism (whatever that means) alongside multiculturalism. Can we have both.

    Spoonley
    Well I hope so. The thing that’s changed is that we changed our immigration policy in 1987 and since 2000 we’ve had the highest immigration of any country in the OECD. So we’ve transformed this country. The number of immigrants who are resident here is larger than Canada we’re level pegging with Australia. Auckland is one of the worlds global immigration cities. So we’ve got to address that question. And weve got this prior discussion or agreement (social contract I would call it) around biculturalism. So we flipped it around. Australia has been reluctant to talk about biculturalism. Canada has but they discussed that after they’ve got official policies of multiculturalism weve got it the other way around and how do we develop a multiculturalism that doesn’t displace biculturalism.

    Laidlaw
    Yes that’s a big one.

    Spoonley
    It’s huge

    Laidlaw
    And a lot of countries Europe in particular are wrestling with how to recognize minorities: the languages, the customs and so on. Both in statute and every day life and there not making much headway it seems if you think of the Netherlands or France. And theyre not doing a very good job of it.

    Spoonley
    No, and if you look at the UK their idea of multiculturalism has not been one that we would like to follow. In fact the Netherlands France and the UK have rejected core ideas behind multiculturalism. And ah I wouldn’t want to repeat their mistakes.

    Laidlaw
    We with our nice gentle relaxed and relatively pragmatic approach may well be in a better position to do this. People will come and people will go. The 21st Century will be a time of intnse migration back and forth. Maybe we’re better placed than almost anybody else to allow this just to flow on while we continue to deal with the sub nationality of Maori?

    Spoonley
    and and our size is a help we do things and we get on with things [without opposition] that a big country can’t. I do think that one of the things that we’ve got to recognise is that weve altered the demography of our country through these new immigration policies and we really haven’t included Maori in that debate. And we haven’t given them a role. I mean we could think about giving them a role in welcoming immigrants in a new way. That’s the challenge.
    https://www.radionz.co.nz/audio/player?audio_id=2199275

    maybe why we have te reo out our ears?

    Reply
    • sorethumb

       /  June 25, 2018

      I haven’t finished transcribing -paragraph about Japanese [most interesting bit].
      While I might be called a conspiracy theorist I would suggest this:
      https://www.edge.org/response-detail/27168

      Reply
      • sorethumb

         /  June 25, 2018

        Chris Laidlaw was “galled”(?) to see British subject on his passport.

        Reply
        • PartisanZ

           /  June 25, 2018

          What can one say?

          All that ‘transcribing’ … all that interviewing and talking … all that academic reasoning … and not one mention of the massive advantage concerning biculturalism-and-multiculturalism we have here in Aotearoa New Zealand … Our ‘point of difference’ … our prosocial or cooperative advantage … our Constitutional ‘bedrock’ …

          Its name is Te Tiriti o Waitangi.

          Reply
    • sorethumb

       /  June 25, 2018

      My interpretation is that we have a soft nationalism and weak national identity. That way we can “attract” migrants. We became soft when we became bicultural and that opened the door to the migrants we have been able to “attract”. As a result Maori are no longer the second largest minority:

      Paul Spoonley
      Well there is and I mean, in terms of Auckland it has already happened. So the Asian community is considerably larger than the Maori community of Auckland and yet Auckland is the largest Maori community in the country. So I think Auckland is the test case or laboritory in which we get to play around and decide how we do politics and in this case recognition of diversity and we started to day by talking about the council and the wards you know we are far from getting that right so we need to ask the question right around the community “are there difference between people who are tangatawhenua in terms of recognition as opposed to those who are immigrants and their decendants?” My answer is yes! I mean I think the conversation should be a very different conversation. And so i react quite strongly and quite negatively when people say , you know, there’s me, Im Pakeha and there’s others who are diffferent. No there are not they are not all the same. [Oh the irony]

      Julie Zhu
      “but that kind of positioning sort of positioning of Pakeha and everyone else. I always try to think of the ideal as Maori and everyone else because Maori are kind of the only unique aspect of NZ that really needs to be upheld if we are to move forward and I think there just needs to be solidarity.”

      https://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/outspoken/audio/2018628359/outspoken-auckland-issues

      Reply
  6. Gezza

     /  June 25, 2018

    I think Welly in general might be overdoing the Maori language capital thing – but that’s what you get when a place with a lot of cultured people embraces an essentially good idea & then takes it to extremes, like Air All Blacks does: we’ll see.

    I haven’t read the Dom Post for well over a decade. I used to like stuff online but I’m finding now that The Herald online is more to my liking. Both of them are full of trivial shit though. Women’s magazines with a little bit of repeater-style news.

    Reply
    • sorethumb

       /  June 25, 2018

      They are desperately trying to convince us everyone (bar me and Don Brash) wants to learn Te Reo. Having started it if they back down they have egg on their faces. As I posted above this might be because the government broke a contract with Maori so Helen Clark could get herself a cushy job at the UN?

      Reply
      • phantom snowflake

         /  June 25, 2018

        Ko taku reo taku ohooho, ko taku reo taku mapihi mauria.

        Reply
        • sorethumb

           /  June 25, 2018

          白左

          Reply
          • Gezza

             /  June 25, 2018

            Snowy may not actually be white, or left.

            Reply
            • phantom snowflake

               /  June 25, 2018

              I haven’t even ‘come out’ here as e.g. female, male, gender fluid, agender, or ambigender but am leaning towards cryptogender!

        • sorethumb

           /  June 25, 2018

          No I will Not hand over those cigarettes!

          Reply
  7. MaureenW

     /  June 25, 2018

    Print the rag in Maori too, otherwise it’s just gratuitous tokenism.

    Reply
    • PartisanZ

       /  June 25, 2018

      Many Maori would disagree MaureenW … and many Pakeha too …

      Frankness, openness and sincerity can be conveyed in just a few words …

      And the journey towards fairness, truth and reconciliation has to start somewhere.

      Reply
      • MaureenW

         /  June 25, 2018

        I agree with your middle para – personally I don’t think putting the banner in Māori meets that criteria.

        Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  June 25, 2018

          I don’t think so, either. It’s worse than pointless.

          Reply
          • sorethumb

             /  June 25, 2018

            If one learns arabic one can travel to [??]. If one learns te reo one can….?

            Reply
            • Gezza

               /  June 25, 2018

              If one learns Arabic one can speak to Arabs anywhere in their native tongue, provided it’s the same Arabic language, and they speak it too. If one learns Maori, one can speak to Maori anywhere in their native tongue, if they speak it too.

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  June 26, 2018

              It is good to learn a new language, but Maori can only be used here, and by a tiny number of people, so learning it can never be seen as a practical thing even though it’s an academic exercise.

              Latin is a great exercise for the little grey cells.

    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  June 25, 2018

      Virtue signaling – and pathetic.

      Reply
      • sorethumb

         /  June 25, 2018

        He!!

        Reply
        • sorethumb

           /  June 25, 2018

          Ok I don’t know what “he!” means but you hear it at the end of some programs : “He ahrrrrrrrrr!” I thought it meant “good one”

          Reply
      • PDB

         /  June 25, 2018

        In keeping with Maori tradition they should have no written language – shame on the Dominion post for such insensitivity. No doubt some ‘white mo-fo’s’ came up with such a dumb, insulting idea. I’d imagine a verbal apology and some koha is in order to rectify things.

        Reply

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