Nation: Nigel Farage interview

Nigel Farage has been controversial in the UK, especially in relation to Brexit.

He will visit New Zealand in September: Nigel Farage coming to Auckland

Nigel Farage, the politician who led the successful Brexit campaign in the UK, is coming to Auckland in September as part of an Australasian tour.

The former leader of the UK Independence Party (UKIP) will be on his An Entertaining Evening With Nigel Faragespeaking tour. Ticket prices start at $49 for students, while general admission is $89, then it’s $295 for a meet/greet ticket, and $495 for a backstage pass.

A promotional email from Australian celebrity management organisation Markson Sparks described Farage as the “world’s most charismatic politician”, who “changed the world of politics as we know it”.

An odd item from Newshub yesterday: Brexit campaigner Nigel Farage forced to deny he dyed his hair to emulate Trump

Newshub Nation today:

This is the civility argument, at least to some degree. The Left can call him a monster but that’s not what many people will see. And that then means those people are then attracted to him.

13 Comments

  1. Zedd

     /  June 30, 2018

    just what we need.. UKs answer to MrT, saying Winston is also in the same boat !
    Whilst NZF maybe ‘right of Labour’ they are no way the NZ Alt-Right; thats more like Natl-Act

    • Zedd

       /  June 30, 2018

      methinks Farage is likely, about as welcome in NZ.. as MrT (NOT)

    • Corky

       /  June 30, 2018

      Put it this way, Zedd. He isn’t Hilary Clinton. He will speak to sold out venue. Righties can be accused of many things…being boring isn’t one of them

      • Zedd

         /  June 30, 2018

        ‘Righties can be accused of many things…being boring isn’t one of them’ sez corky

        ‘Thats just your opinion’ sez I 😀

  2. David

     /  June 30, 2018

    Farage,s non stop campaigning on behalf of the long neglected working class of Britain was inspirational. The man is hated by the rich elite who got wealthy off cheap imported labour but has huge support in the working class areas where UKIP won 3.9m votes (12.6% of the vote) in the 2015 election and got just 1 seat.

    • Gezza

       /  June 30, 2018

      I’m just gona watch Nigel’s interview online now. I got to quite like the guy by the time he stepped down. It was fun watching him tell the European Parliament Ha ha up yours you pack of good for nothing leeches.

      • Gezza

         /  June 30, 2018

        Yep. Witty, urbane, rational & charming. Strong believer in the Commonwealth & in re-establishing trade between member countries & Britain. Noted when challenged about Britain’s history of taking over other countries that the difference with all the other colonial powers is their colonies hate them, while Britain’s all still want to maintain relationships & be in the Commonwealth. And that there are countries that were never British colonies that want to join it. Still like the guy.

  3. sorethumb

     /  June 30, 2018

    As I said speaking Te Reo is part of the progressive agenda “Maori plus everyone else”.

    Tod Niall
    Because I would argue it has taken Maori a long time to get to a place where they are not yet where they feel they should be.

    Is there a new dynamic here that we have to worry about Paul?

    Paul Spoonley
    Well there is and I mean, in terms of Auckland it has already happened. So the Asian community is considerably larger than the Maori community of Auckland and yet Auckland is the largest Maori community in the country. So I think Auckland is the test case or laboritory in which we get to play around and decide how we do politics and in this case recognition of diversity and we started to day by talking about the council and the wards you know we are far from getting that right so we need to ask the question right around the community “are there difference between people who are tangatawhenua in terms of recognition as opposed to those who are immigrants and their decendants?” My answer is yes! I mean I think the conversation should be a very different conversation. And so i react quite strongly and quite negatively when people say , you know, there’s me, Im Pakeha and there’s others who are diffferent. No there are not they are not all the same.

    Julie Zhu
    “but that kind of positioning sort of positioning of Pakeha and everyone else. I always try to think of the ideal as Maori and everyone else because Maori are kind of the only unique aspect of NZ that really needs to be upheld if we are to move forward and I think there just needs to be solidarity.”

    https://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/outspoken/audio/2018628359/outspoken-auckland-issues

    • phantom snowflake

       /  June 30, 2018

      One does not need to be ‘progressive’ in order to promote the retention of Maori language and culture. It could even be viewed from the perspective of conserving that which is traditional. The National Party, hardly a bastion of ‘progressiveness’, has had numerous members of parliament who are fluent in Te Reo.

  1. Nation: Nigel Farage interview — Your NZ – NZ Conservative Coalition