Teachers striking for bigger wage increases

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37 Comments

  1. Gezza

     /  July 4, 2018

    Is their pay offer worth more than National’s tax cuts?

    Reply
  2. George

     /  July 4, 2018

    Time to unleash the Internet !
    One teacher to supervise 50+ kids.
    Solves the ‘shortage’
    And definances the union all in one go

    Reply
  3. PDB

     /  July 4, 2018

    I don’t think teachers have as much support for a massive pay increase in comparison to nurses – what passes for teaching nowadays is largely a joke and the fact they do short days and have so many holidays (even making some up like ‘Easter Tuesday’ & accidentally always seem to have ‘teacher only days’ on long weekends).

    Unfortunately there are some excellent teachers around that deserve a hefty pay rise but due to unionism they will have to be judged and paid based on the average teacher’s ability.

    A pay increase is perhaps due but a massive increase I suggest isn’t justified, at least in comparison to nurses.

    Reply
    • Blazer

       /  July 4, 2018

      have to agree with you there PDB.
      Everyone jumping on the strike band waggon…now.

      Reply
      • PDB

         /  July 4, 2018

        That’s a first Blazer….who’s next up to the batting plate for a big pay increase?

        Reply
      • Zedd

         /  July 4, 2018

        @Blzr

        I heard a Labour MP (Hipkins ??) respond to criticism from Natl, about these strikes occurring under new Govt. by saying (paraphrased); This is because they know they will at least be heard by this Govt.. under Natl they were summarily just ignored; ongoing Union bashing !!

        Reply
        • High Flying Duck

           /  July 4, 2018

          Generally strikes happen when you are not being heard or listened to. That’s the point of them.
          Weasel words as always from the Minister who listens to no-one but the man in the mirror.

          Reply
          • Zedd

             /  July 4, 2018

            ‘Generally strikes happen when you are not being heard or listened to. That’s the point of them.’ sez HFD

            OR.. maybe as I said, after 9 looooong years of not being heard or listened to, (by Natl) they now think they will be, by this Govt. & it was time to take this action.. ‘draw the line in the sand.. this far; no further !’

            Reply
            • PDB

               /  July 4, 2018

              There’s a very rare & real chance (more so than any recent govt) that this will be a one-term govt which has the effect of everybody jumping on the bandwagon ASAP of wanting hefty pay increases in the public service in case the easier govt to blackmail via the threat of strike action is rolled in 2020.

              Labour only have themselves to blame by giving billions to well-off students and having very little money set aside for public servant pay increases – something they were warned about in the election campaign (ala the ‘fiscal hole’).

            • High Flying Duck

               /  July 4, 2018

              If they were not being listened to by Nats – why didn’t they strike?
              If they are being listened to now – why are they having to strike?

          • duperez

             /  July 4, 2018

            So the Minister doesn’t listen to anyone but himself. In that case he must’ve been telling himself, “Don’t give them any more,” as signalled by teachers saying they’re going on strike.

            Did you want him to be telling himself, “Give them what they want”?

            And do you think the subsequent caterwauling in such an event would have been about the minister only listening to the man in the mirror, the fact he’d kowtowed to the union or that teachers were being paid too much?

            Reply
      • Dave K

         /  July 4, 2018

        False news obviously…

        ‘Questioned directly by moderator Mike Hosking (who was exacting on both, in his rat-a-tat, pop-economist kind-of way) whether New Zealand could be in for national strikes, Ardern had her most emphatic moment: “No. We. Will. Not.”

        Reply
  4. Trevors_elbow

     /  July 4, 2018

    Saveourschools – save our arabs from any competition more like …. so why did they not strike often when the Nats were the government? If things were so bad and they have so much community support would have been a doddle to secure a series of payrises over the previous governments term….

    Reply
    • Blazer

       /  July 4, 2018

      from D.Khan…’No, Nikki, our strike is a result of a decade of mistreatment, mostly at the hands of National. The current Education Minister has a lot of bad policy to sort out, thanks to you, Hekia Parata, Anne Tolley, and your lackeys in ACT.’

      7:19 AM – Jul 4, 2018

      Reply
  5. David

     /  July 4, 2018

    Its a funny old situation where Labour could give teachers a hefty payrise then the unions will donate to Labour (and they select the leader) and organize for them.
    Its not a good situation and could well actually backfire on Labour.

    Reply
  6. Sunny

     /  July 4, 2018

    I’d like to see Primary School teachers made more accountable and skilled. When a boy in my sons class asked to do long division the teacher wasn’t sure and put him on Khan academy. The kids are in modern learning and they teach each other. And rarely work in small groups with the teacher. The report cards are worthless and give you know idea of where your child is at. Primary schools need to step up to the plate with better performance. More focus on maths teachers or speacilist maths teachers. And science. In saying that the big class sizes is no easy task. Spend more on primary school teachers with higher skills in the core subjects. Spend more on specialist teachers for pull out skills supporting kids in smaller groups for reading and maths.

    Reply
    • High Flying Duck

       /  July 4, 2018

      Our oldest went to an open day at a good intermediate school 2 years ago and one of the big selling points they had was that they had maths teachers teaching maths, instead of the generalists that most schools used. A sad indictment on the way kids are taught these days.

      Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  July 4, 2018

        We had one-size-fits-all at primary school, and I think at intermediate, except for sewing and such things.

        I remember the open day at mine, and that the Form II pupils seemed almost like adults to us 😀 We were in awe of these uniformed people who seemed so much older than us.

        Reply
      • duperez

         /  July 4, 2018

        “A sad indictment on the way kids are taught these days.” When did “these days” start?

        Reply
        • High Flying Duck

           /  July 4, 2018

          When intellectual rigour was substituted for airy fairy feel-good metrics and the value of intellectual subjects was devalued so that advanced calculus is now deemed as being on a par with home economics.

          While the rigidity of learning in the past needed to be relaxed to allow for different intelligences and learning styles, the current system is a race to the bottom with poor subject equivalences, ropey assessments and far too wide grade bands.

          Highlighted very well here:

          https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11956155

          Reply
          • PDB

             /  July 4, 2018

            All good points HFD – the start of the problem occurred when they decided to dumb-down the education system and obfuscate the measurements used to access students.

            Reply
            • PartisanZ

               /  July 4, 2018

              Possibly not a good comment to make a spelling and comprehension mistake in PDB?

            • PDB

               /  July 4, 2018

              When deleting and changing comments in posts sometimes mistakes occur and there is no edit feature.

              PZ: “comprehension mistake in PDB?” – As you have shown.

            • duperez

               /  July 4, 2018

              “The start of the problem occurred when they decided to dumb-down the education system and obfuscate the measurements used to access students.” So obvious.
              When they started listing sets of skills a kid had or certain things a kid had achieved or could do that really stuffed things up. Some employers couldn’t understand that. They wanted the true oil, the explicit, unerring summary of what a kid was capable of, as in “Mathematics: 72%”.

            • PDB

               /  July 4, 2018

              Parents are as much in the dark as anyone as to how their children are really doing at school nowadays – no reason why they can’t have both the ‘true oil’ (as you put it) + the more subjective stuff. Unfortunately a lot of kids are leaving schools with bugger all skills, especially life-skills.

          • PartisanZ

             /  July 4, 2018

            Re: Herald article – Correction HFD … “highlighted very well FOR SOME here”

            “You can be illiterate and innumerate, yet an outstanding painter or actor.”

            This might be taking exaggeration-for-effect a shade too far …

            How will an illiterate actor read their script?

            How will an illiterate and/or innumerate painter know how to describe the concept, context and size of their work? And, arguably, if they are that good a painter, why shouldn’t someone else do it for them?

            For someone for whom advanced calculus is beyond their capabilities, home economics – which might lead to a perfectly decent career as a chef, nutritionist or who knows what – realistically should be on a par with calculus … Why ever not?

            Reply
            • High Flying Duck

               /  July 6, 2018

              Do you think mankind has been pushed forward by the heroic efforts of Julia Child & Heston Blumenthal? Or was Einstein, or Newton, Attenborough or Darwin more responsible for improving insight into the world and how it works and for progressing mankind?
              There is no stigma in home econ, but to put it on a par with the sciences or maths is to devalue learning in a most egregious way.
              Although it is interesting that Hosking is of a mind with you – he thinks a subject is a subject and both have equal value.

          • duperez

             /  July 4, 2018

            So the sad indictment on ‘the way kids are taught these days’ is not about specialist teachers of mathematics in primary schools. ?

            As far as the Herald article goes, that speaks not to pupils learning and the value of whatever they have learned to them, but to status and recognition.

            Should we not have allowed our child in Year 13 to do photography along with physics, chemistry, biology, calculus and english because it’s just a ‘play’, ‘easy’ subject? The author of the Herald piece sneeringly suggests telling his sister to “load up on her photography,” etc.

            And what learning from such a bundle were most important when it came to doing research and theses at university? I’d contend the discipline, the rigour, the conceptual aspects developed through the photography were key elements in attacking and completing complex scientific work and then continuing into the workforce.

            I accept you might not see intellectual rigour in the arts. Maybe that reflects the “rigidity of learning” you mention.

            Reply
            • High Flying Duck

               /  July 6, 2018

              When subjects are given equal value, no mater the content, there is a natural tendency to sink to the lowest common denominator. Why take a difficult subject and risk failure?
              In the end the important and truly progressive subjects end up being shunned and the country is significantly worse off because of it. Great businesses require knowledge in complex subject matter. This is being lost with the Utopian “all things are equal” mantra that is simply wrong.

  7. Alan Wilkinson

     /  July 4, 2018

    And these clowns wonder why business confidence is down.

    Reply
    • Blazer

       /  July 4, 2018

      who cares.

      Reply
      • PDB

         /  July 4, 2018

        Obviously you do Blazer because every time it is mentioned you are one of the first to post in reply.

        Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  July 4, 2018

        Some of them wonder. The less endowed don’t care.

        Reply
      • Fight4NZ

         /  July 5, 2018

        I care that our business community is comprised of such visionless, self-serving morons.

        Reply
    • PartisanZ

       /  July 4, 2018

      Could business confidence be down because corporate-capitalist-political elites see the possibility of the education system slipping out of their control?

      ‘Failing’ to only produce the willing workers in inorganic factories and FIIRE enterprises required to justify and maintain the status-quo system … ?

      We’re on the very cusp of human development, technological advancement and current orthodoxy failure radically transforming if not transcending the systems of school and work, business, employment, economic and social organisation as we know them …

      Reply

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