A hero called Mohammed

A fairly typical Kiwi thing – stepping up and doing what can be done in an emergencyh, but in this case a bit more than normal, saving someone’s life.

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35 Comments

  1. High Flying Duck

     /  July 13, 2018

    Ummmm….well done Mohammed?
    Not sure what the point of this post is? As you say, fairly typical Kiwi thing to step up when emergencies happen. Do you usually post on such events, or is this post race or religion based?.

    Reply
    • sorethumb

       /  July 13, 2018

      Man bites dog story

      Reply
    • Blazer

       /  July 13, 2018

      ‘Good work skipping over the life saving filler to get to the crux of the matter

      Reply
    • MaureenW

       /  July 13, 2018

      The point is that someone called “Mohammed” did something good but, unfortunately, this Mohammed doesn’t deserve being identified by a surname, as his christian identifies him sufficiently as a muslim.

      Like I posted below, if the guys name had of been John, there would be no equivalent story written with this context.

      Reply
    • I’m sure I don’t need to tell you what the point is.

      Reply
      • There are stories like this in the paper quite often. X saving a life with CPR, pulling someone from a car, diving in to pull a drowning person out, helping to save people from fires…..

        Mohamed is almost certainly a Muslim, but that has nothing to do with the fact that he happened to be the one who knew CPR.

        Reply
  2. sorethumb

     /  July 13, 2018

    Mohammed redeems himself (a little).

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  July 13, 2018

      For all you know, Mohammed is an agnostic or atheist. Keep it real.

      Reply
      • I can’t believe that thumb is so mean-spirited.

        To me, the point of the story is that someone knew CPR and did it, saving a life.His race and religion are irrelevant.

        Reply
        • sorethumb

           /  July 13, 2018

          I was viewing itt in the wider context of the place of Muslims in our society. Not purely on it’s merit.

          Reply
  3. Missy

     /  July 13, 2018

    Well done to Mohammed for using his first aid training to save a life, and kudos to the CEO for recognising it.

    Reply
    • MaureenW

       /  July 13, 2018

      Just as well his name was not John, wouldn’t have been mentioned.

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  July 13, 2018

        Well it probably would have. It just wouldn’t have been mentioned by PG.
        Our Chief Legal Officer had a heart attack & was saved by CPR by a female board member, who was similarly publicly thanked & congratulated.

        Reply
      • NOEL

         /  July 13, 2018

        Oh grow up.

        Reply
        • sorethumb

           /  July 13, 2018

          A story like this is not seen at face value; it is contextual.

          Reply
          • sorethumb

             /  July 13, 2018

            i.e part of the wider argument over Muslim immigration. Listening to ex policeman on Nine to Noon about gang members. he said most looking for family etc but also come from shit circumstances. Key to it all though (and I knew a few gang members) is a culture that is outside and antagonistic to mainstream culture [ordinary fella’s like me were “bunnies”] .

            Reply
  4. Blazer

     /  July 13, 2018

    Just Hisco earning his $4mil plus salary….what a wonderful guy.

    Reply
    • High Flying Duck

       /  July 13, 2018

      Good work skipping over the life saving filler to get to the crux of the matter – the tweeter’s salary.

      Reply
      • Blazer

         /  July 13, 2018

        thought he would be saying he was giving the hero a bonus out of his own pay in recognition.

        Reply
        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  July 13, 2018

          Seems ANZ NZ paid for staff CPR training. Well done management.

          Reply
  5. MaureenW

     /  July 13, 2018

    Famous for being called Mohammed.
    Doesn’t Mohammed have a surname, given that Mohammed is one of the most widely used names in the world, I would have thought his surname could have been used to differentiate this Mohammed from the 150 million odd other Mohammeds.

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  July 13, 2018

      Good point. Lots of Americans think there are thousands of Mexicans & South Americans called Heysoos. Because they don’t name their kids Jesus like Latin Christians do.

      Reply
      • We’d be none the wiser, and it gives the man some privacy. Everyone who knows him will know that it was him.

        In this day of first names being used more than they ever were before, I see nothing odd about using the first name only.

        Jesus in Spanish is pron. more or less (it’s hard to transcribe a sound, of course) as if the perthon thpeaking had a lithp.

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  July 13, 2018

          Are you sure? I know Garcia is pronounced Garthia.

          Reply
          • Kitty Catkin

             /  July 13, 2018

            Well, it’s as close as I can get. It’s a sound that’s hard for a non-native speaker to imitate, like the name Ng in Chinese.

            Reply
  6. sorethumb

     /  July 13, 2018

    Multiculturalism brings the globe within our borders. We can tap into the potential this offers us all. A shift in paradigm may be necessary in order to achieve this successfully. I suggest we consider a strength in diversity paradigm as a new way of approaching the issue of ethnic diversity. Government, civil society, private sector, leaders, families and teachers all have a role to play in realising this vision.

    Legislation and policy frameworks can provide frameworks and benchmarks for societal mores, but they cannot dictate human relationships. In order for multiculturalism to be fruitful in New Zealand, each individual must consider his or her relationship to others. It will call for open-mindedness, patience and generosity of spirit from ordinary people. Perhaps, the biggest benefit lies in the enrichment of our human spirit when we choose to open our minds and hearts to new ideas and different ways of doing things. The journey to understanding and accepting others ultimately leads back to understanding one’s self. Multiculturalism offers a path to self-edification – the most basic of all benefits.

    Mervin Singham is Director of the Office of Ethnic Affairs. The Office of Ethnic Affairs works for both the government and ethnic sector in policy development and community advocacy.

    and then there’s real life

    Reply
    • sorethumb

       /  July 13, 2018

      gas bottle man says:

      “I’m just a dumb fella, but I can see that they are coming here because their place is overcrowded”

      Paul Spoonley: “but, but, but: think of my career!?”

      Reply
    • Didn’t understand a word of that. Is English not his first language?

      Reply
    • Gezza

       /  July 13, 2018

      What a pile of meaningless jargon-filled unrealistic shite from Singham. Immigrate – integrate & assimilate. You came here because you liked what you saw. Fit in.

      Reply
      • sorethumb

         /  July 13, 2018

        I think that is the thing. People have a mechanism that instantly categorizes people by race sex and age. Race signals coalitional alliances. However within society there are always factions and people diametrically opposed.If you find (say) an Asian on your side over another Pakeha then they are your coalition member. That’s why a black guy won a council seat (?) for an anti immigration party in Italy.

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  July 13, 2018

          I think there is much less instantly categorising people by race than their was. I was struck by the number of black & other “coloured” people being interviewed by tv reporters during & after the Grenfell Towers disaster. N vey was all talkin just like any uvva Londiners, yeh? N vey n all e uvvers wiv em, wo’eva colour veer skin was, was in no doubt vey was Bri’ish, innit?

          Reply
          • Gezza

             /  July 13, 2018

            My point being, they had assimilated, probably 2nd generation from West Indian & other immigrants. They had the same accents & same issues as any, “working class”, ill-educated, younger people in London, but they sounded like Londoners, & identified, & were accepted, as culturally British.

            Reply
          • sorethumb

             /  July 13, 2018

            You still have to factor weighted dice
            Previous studies have established that people encode the race of each individual they encounter, and do so via computational processes that appear to be both automatic and mandatory.
            http://www.pnas.org/content/98/26/15387

            Reply
          • Gezza

             /  July 13, 2018

            No you don’t. It’s only when people associate different behaviours with skin colour they start to get wary. Kids are colour blind playing unless someone tells them there’s a difference.

            Reply

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