Urging Government to borrow more to pay nurses and teachers more

Both nursing and teacher groups are on a roll. They have already been offered pay raises significantly more than average pay raises – they say it is necessary to catch up ‘after nine years of neglect’ and to attain pay parity.

They say for the good of children and their sectors the Government must borrow more to pay them.

What they don’t say is what a likely flow on effect would be if they get pay increases well over 10%.

Newshub Nation had a decent panel discussion on this today (their panel discussions are often brief and rushed).

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25 Comments

  1. Grimm

     /  July 14, 2018

    Blaming National is easy, but doesn’t make any sense, they invariably capitulated to teachers and anyone in the health sector. In fact, only Maori made them raise the white flag more quickly.

    So much industrial action will define the CoL, in a bad way.

    Reply
    • At least the unions and Labour showed their hands early.

      Reply
    • duperez

       /  July 14, 2018

      I don’t understand the “they invariably capitulated to teachers” bit. Do you mean National gave teachers what they wanted over the nine years? I don’t know how often they had their contract negotiated but if they were given what they wanted how come they think they now need a big top up?

      Reply
    • Blazer

       /  July 14, 2018

      ‘Blaming National is easy’…damn right,about the only thing you have got..right.

      Reply
  2. Alan Wilkinson

     /  July 14, 2018

    No surprises here. More tax and borrowing inevitable as night follows day with this lot.

    Nurses say they need more money because they are overworked. The consequence of more pay will be that DHBs will have to reduce staff numbers.

    Reply
    • The overworked argument is specious. If they earned $1,000,000 a week it wouldn’t make the work any less !

      It should be obvious that it will lead to a sinking lid policy.

      Reply
      • David

         /  July 14, 2018

        The overworked thing is a myth, have friends Mum and Daughter one primary one secondary school and they freely admit they do no work in the holidays or do much extra time given the curriculum is all set out for them there isnt a great deal to do outside of the class room.

        Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  July 14, 2018

          I was thinking about nurses. I know that teachers do work outside school hours; my mother was one, and I know a few.

          But I can’t see that money would ease anyone’s workload, and the idea of NZ borrowing money for this is abhorrent.

          Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  July 14, 2018

          We’d have to keep it up forever !

          Reply
    • Blazer

       /  July 14, 2018

      wipe out the gravy trainers in middle/senior management positions.
      Someone did a comparison with Queensland,roughly same population…and it was ugly.

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  July 14, 2018

        Random occurrence of a higher than average percentage of Neanderthal genes in that particular population group, possibly? 😳

        Reply
        • The woman who was hailed as a heroine for the pay rise given to rest home workers is probably not considered to be one by the people at one I know of. The wages rose, but nothing else did so they are having to try to work out how to accommodate the extra wages when the home’s income was the same. One option was sell off the houses that they now rent out to older people, and which are very popular indeed, with
          a waiting list. No prizes for guessing what else was considered..

          Reply
          • Gezza

             /  July 14, 2018

            Yep. The fees mum had to pay for dad’s rest home care went up several thousand dollars at the same time the caregivers’ new pay rates kicked in, as predicted.

            Reply
            • Kitty Catkin

               /  July 14, 2018

              What a coincidence – I don’t think.

            • Gezza

               /  July 14, 2018

              Don’t get me wrong. There was nothing coincidental about it. It was explained at the time that that was the reason. Rest Homes are run by private Healthcare Providers, contracted to the DHB’s. Staff are paid from patient pensions topped up by the available funding from the DHB, & to operate profitably the unbudgetted additional cost had to be obtained from ma – until her personal savings had been reduced to a set limit, after which the government took over paying it from dad’s superannuation plus a Winz aged care subsidy.

  3. David

     /  July 14, 2018

    Teachers are way over paid already, I would be cutting the salaries of the dead set useless ones. Want to be treated as professionals well bloody act like it and we will pay you on performance.

    Reply
    • duperez

       /  July 14, 2018

      No doubt the ‘over pay’ factor is why thousands are lining up to take up the job. A teacher told me recently after they’d had a meeting to do with their salary thing, that they’d been told the average age of primary teachers in New Zealand is 57.

      Reply
  4. Alan Wilkinson

     /  July 14, 2018

    How is quality and efficiency promoted and rewarded in the health and education sectors?

    Reply
  5. Blazer

     /  July 14, 2018

    didn’t watch but is this mentioned?..

    ‘Urging Government to borrow more to pay nurses and teachers more’

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  July 14, 2018

      Might not have been. I found the whole segment online but I’d had a late nite & I dozed off. I think I heard the phrase “increasing their debt ceiling” before drifting blissfully into the land of nod.

      Reply
  6. Gerrit

     /  July 14, 2018

    Another $12M for Pike River announced today. Plenty of money, just not for nurses.

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  July 14, 2018

      Well, to be fair, one of the women from the families said on 1ewes that New Zealanders wanted the governmet to spend this $27 million & now the extra on getting their men home to them.

      Reply

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